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When I ordered the Gripper they also had some interesting C clamps to hold their dado gauge to the fence, so I ordered a couple too. I was playing around with them in the shop today and think they are going to be versatile little clamps.

I ran a maple 1X2 through the router table and made a 20" long strip with a DT down the center of the strip. Then cut them into pieces for pads for the ends of the clamps. Also made a sacrificial fence for the TS , It can also be clamped to the bench for a straight edge. I can put a dovetail slot in each end of a piece for a straight edge guide to cut or rout across sheet goods. It is a good clamp for keeping out of the way from hanging up on things when in use. They would work on jigs where dovetail slots instead of T tracks for one off jigs. Here are some pictures.

Herb
 

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Ross
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Nice one.
 

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Paul
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Those will come in handy Herb. I saw something similar locally but the arms are round... just drill holes for them. I was a little concerned about their strength though, they didn't look very heavy duty. Yours look stronger.
 

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cool find Herb...
 

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I purchased a couple of these about four months ago at the local Woodcraft Fall vendors fair. I have been experimenting with them and really like them.

Unlike other types of clamps they are not real quick to initially set-up, so spur of the moment use is not necessarily practical. However, I have used them for a dedicated saw/router guide to clamp the guide down on large sheets and for an auxiliary table saw fence. I'm sure that I'll find more uses for them in the future.

They are not outrageous price wise and because one arm fits into a dovetail, they don't slip like some clamps can. Plan it out and you can bury the clamp into a piece of wood and the clamp body doesn't stick out to hinder other tool usage.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
I purchased a couple of these about four months ago at the local Woodcraft Fall vendors fair. I have been experimenting with them and really like them.

Unlike other types of clamps they are not real quick to initially set-up, so spur of the moment use is not necessarily practical. However, I have used them for a dedicated saw/router guide to clamp the guide down on large sheets and for an auxiliary table saw fence. I'm sure that I'll find more uses for them in the future.

They are not outrageous price wise and because one arm fits into a dovetail, they don't slip like some clamps can. Plan it out and you can bury the clamp into a piece of wood and the clamp body doesn't stick out to hinder other tool usage.
What Bill said is correct. One way I plan to get around the quick set up ,is to make the wooden pads that can be slipped on and off and reused. These can be made in various widths and lengths too. this can give full bearing on the clamping surface,rather than just at the end of the jaw.

The way they are built they can be slide along the dovetail like a T track to position them conveniently on jigs.
They seem quite strong,and I didn't observe any springiness in the jaw.
Herb
 

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I'm interested. But what advantage does the dovetail shape have over using a T slot in this case. Why use a dovetail clamp over a regular clamp that works in a T slot? I guess I'm missing something here.

Charley
 

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I'm interested. But what advantage does the dovetail shape have over using a T slot in this case. Why use a dovetail clamp over a regular clamp that works in a T slot? I guess I'm missing something here.

Charley
Not sure they are better, just that it is another application for them.

Herb
 

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I think they would be stronger with the groove in the opposite side of the board. Would put pressure through the whole board.
 

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Thank you for the great idea. I have a pair from Rockler with the round tangs and I'm not convincd that they work as well as they should.
 

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When I bought my clamps I, also, purchased a Matchfit Dado jig. However, I haven't taken the time to play with it and it is still in the package (for now!). This uses the dovetail clamps to attach the jig to your tablesaw fence. You can then set it to make an extremely accurate dado for precision inlays or lap joints.



For certain repetitive cuts it would be a time saver. Only actual use will tell if it is actually useful.
 

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Very Interesting. My wife is looking at picture frames similar to those below and this looks as if it would be ideal for making them.
Exactly what this jig would excel at doing. You don't need the jig to do it, but, the set-up would be a lot quicker with a lot less potential for dimensional shift if you have to re-do/adjust the set-up.

The ability to adjust the jig makes fiddling around with different stop blocks a thing of the past. The jig provides all of the stops in one handy jig and the clamp makes it stable and a low profile attachment.
 
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Exactly what this jig would excel at doing. You don't need the jig to do it, but, the set-up would be a lot quicker with a lot less potential for dimensional shift if you have to re-do/adjust the set-up.

The ability to adjust the jig makes fiddling around with different stop blocks a thing of the past. The jig provides all of the stops in one handy jig and the clamp makes it stable and a low profile attachment.
Just what I was thinking but - and not that I'm cheap - $20 would be fine for the jig, but having to buy the pair of clamps raises the cost to $60 which is getting a little pricey for what might possibly be a one-time use. Hmmm, I wonder if the jig could just be clamped to the fence over the body......
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Just what I was thinking but - and not that I'm cheap - $20 would be fine for the jig, but having to buy the pair of clamps raises the cost to $60 which is getting a little pricey for what might possibly be a one-time use. Hmmm, I wonder if the jig could just be clamped to the fence over the body......
Th jig has a magnet on the bottom to hold it down to the table saw top, and wood clamp on the top should work.
Herb
 

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Just what I was thinking but - and not that I'm cheap - $20 would be fine for the jig, but having to buy the pair of clamps raises the cost to $60 which is getting a little pricey for what might possibly be a one-time use. Hmmm, I wonder if the jig could just be clamped to the fence over the body......
It doesn't have to be a "one-time" use. I use stop blocks all of the time for different types of operations. They are a necessity to avoid material entrapment and kickback on certain table saw operations. Instead of having to go find a piece of scrap wood the right size you can keep this at the table saw and not have to hunt for a block.

I'm sure, that, like all tools, once you have it you find more and more things to use it for. Pricey, maybe! What's your time worth? If you're a hobbyist it may not matter, if you're in business, then time is money. Like most here, my money needs to stretch. So, I decide my tool purchases based on ultimate returns.

As for the clamps, they're brand new to the market. Once they have been out there for awhile the price will more then likely adjust. You'll be able to catch them on sale or cheaper at different vendors.
 

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Never thought about using it as a regular stop block, thanks for pointing that out. As you said, that eliminates the need to go looking for a little block to clamp on the fence all the time. And the price does tend to come down after a product has been out for a while. Like @RainMan 2.0, I'm starting to worry about how much being on this forum is costing me in new tool purchases - although I have to admit that Mike's (in Detroit) recommendation of the Betterlee dust collection base for my router and the recommendation of the Incra miter gauge from several members has gotten me a couple of really great additions to my collection.
 

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Never thought about using it as a regular stop block, thanks for pointing that out. As you said, that eliminates the need to go looking for a little block to clamp on the fence all the time. And the price does tend to come down after a product has been out for a while. Like @RainMan 2.0, I'm starting to worry about how much being on this forum is costing me in new tool purchases - although I have to admit that Mike's (in Detroit) recommendation of the Betterlee dust collection base for my router and the recommendation of the Incra miter gauge from several members has gotten me a couple of really great additions to my collection.
That's why you "pick your battles". In this case a clamp, is a clamp, is a clamp. These just happen to be a different configuration then; say a, "F" clamp, wooden clamp, etc....pick one. They all happen to have specific characteristics that might be desirable in certain applications. Not all clamps can do the same things. Can you use a bar clamp to attach the stop block or tool guide? Yes, you can. However, it might stick up/out and interfere with the operation. These are "low profile" and provide certain advantages not offered by another type of clamp.

So, having a couple of these in the clamp stable my be advantageous.

Like all tools they are, ultimately, a matter of personal preference. 10-20 years of use down the road and you probably won't even remember what you originally paid for them. All you will know is that for certain operations these are the tools, that, you reach for to get it done.
 
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