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Here's a snap of three projects I've completed. It will be apparent that I'm new to this but I'm quite pleased with my first results.
The table is in native NZ Kauri with Amarican Ash inserts.
The twig pot is Fijiian Kauri and the candlestick - one of a pair and my first attempt at copy-turning - is in native Rimu.
 

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Looks great. I doubt anyone would think this is your first attempt. I realy like your use of contrasting plugs on the table.

Rusty
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Down under

Thanks Rusty. I guess the faults are more apparent to the maker. Still, it taught me a lot.
Forgot to mention the finish (as called for in the thread title). All the pieces were sanded on the lathe using 180 to 320 grit then sanded along the grain.
A coat of sanding sealer was cut back with 320 grit and then two coats of Danish Oil worked in with P600 wet & dry paper. A final coat of beeswax finished the job.
 

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Hi Geordie

You did a GREAT job :), I like the look of the Milkwood almost looks like maple :)
Is it hardwood or soft ?

MilkWood
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alstonia#Description
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alstonia#Description

Bj :)

You may want to take a look at the bit below it's made for just the type of base/column you made. :), no clamps needed,they work great. :) they do come with instructions but it works best if you make a jig to fit over the lathe and use a plunge router to put the dovetail in the base with a home made index jig to set it up and lock it in place.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi bobj3 and thanks for the reply. Sorry if the title of my post was misleading. I first put in "Down under wood" coming as I do from NZ. Then, probably because I'd had a beer or three, I thought I'd be smart and inserted "milk" to get "... under milk wood" (after Dylan Thomas - the Welsh poet & writer).

No, the wood is Kauri (Agathis Australis) and is a fairly hard straight close grained timber which is great to work on and off the lathe. It has beautiful orange/red flecks in the grain which unfortunately can't be seen in the photo. The Kauri is protected now and so is expensive but at one time the crown & stump woods were used for panelling and high-end furniture while the trunks were a favourite for ship's masts. The largest existing (Tane Mahouta - God of the Forest) has a girth of 13.3m and is 51m high (what's that - about 44' x 265').
 

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Welcome to the forums nzgeordie, and thanks for posting pictures of three great looking projects. Keep up the good work.
 

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nzgeordie said:
Here's a snap of three projects I've completed. It will be apparent that I'm new to this but I'm quite pleased with my first results.
The table is in native NZ Kauri with Amarican Ash inserts.
The twig pot is Fijiian Kauri and the candlestick - one of a pair and my first attempt at copy-turning - is in native Rimu.
Welcome George
Good looking projects congratulations keep up the good work.
Just one question
What was the joint used to join the legs to the centre column?
Sorry two questions: What method did you use to clamp it together?
Tom
 

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Thanks Tom. To answer your questions, the feet are dowel jointed to the centre column (no screws or nails anywhere in the construction). I made a V groove in a piece of 4 x 4 using a bench saw and clamped the centre post into the groove which made it simple to drill the holes for the dowels on a drill press. To clamp the odd shaped feet while the glue was setting (this is going to be difficult to describe!) I put a quick release clamp across the foot so the bar of the clamp was bearing down on the outside face of the foot (with some padding between bar and foot to avoid marking the piece) then another clamp from the back of the centre column and bearing down on the bar of the clamp across the foot. Does that make sense? It was a bit Heath Robinson but it worked.
Since then, I've made myself a router jig which lets me rout the holes in turned pieces while still on the lathe using the lathe indexing head to lock the piece in place while I rout the dowel holes - much easier and more accurate and I can use the jig for fluting etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
BJ,
Just had a look at the dovetail bit for jointing feet to turned legs. It looks like a much better system than dowelling as it seems to save having to form a curve in the foot face where it joins the pedestal (?).
Thanks again.
 

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Hi Geordie you're welcome

Take a real hard look at the bit, it puts in two cuts at one time , the dovetail and sq.socket (sholder) this why it holds so well, dovetail to lock it in the sholder to line it up and keep it sq. to the column . :)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks Dusty. I cheated a bit by not showing the other candlestick of the pair. It was my first attempt at copy turning and taught me that I should make a template first and make both sticks to that and not make one stick then try to copy it!
 
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