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This is one of my projects I plan to add to my shop this coming year.

Bill Pentz says it all. Lots of good reading.
Dust Collection Research - Downdraft Table

For me, I should be able to build it to fit my adjustable height worktable. I had a brainstorm that I could simply lift out one router, set the table in place and hook up the hose to my dust collector through the opening in the table. Hmmm...that may or may not work out. It might turn out to be a hassle to connect the hose, then disconnect it when I am through. An easier way would be to connect the hose to a port on the end of the table.

At some point, I will draw up my design. It will be easy to attach it to the work table with a couple of clamps.

According to Bill's chart, I should be able to make a box that has a surface of about 20" x 30". My worktable is 30" x 37".

But where will I store it when not needed? That is the 64,000 dollar question! :eek:
 

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Brother Mike, Most of the downdraft sanding tables that I've personally seen and / or utilized had a flat [perforated] top with an edge just an inch or so tall. I know McMaster - Carr has what they call "soft-latches" that you could mount on your base table and when the DDST is necessary, simply complete the "latching" to the perimeter of your DDST after you've removed it from the wall where it was hanging when you aren't using it. Those "soft latches" are super-nice and won't tear the belt loops off your pants.

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
 

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I built one several years back. Now, it is an indispensable part of my shop.

Though mine runs off a 3hp collector with two bags and two cartridges, I was unimpressed with it, UNTIL I added a back, top and two sides, forcing all the air pulled in by the collector to pass me, as I worked at the front of it.

Now, I even use it for small router projects. Obviously, I do most my sanding in it, but I, also, do carving work with the Foredom and the high speed rotary grinders. It's comforting watching the 1/4" collect, aggressive bit throwing fines straight off a piece of wood, to have them do a 90 and pull down into the station.

In short, whatever you build, make sure it has a back, top and sides to crank the efficiency up a bazillion percent.

NOTES:

(1) I "think" I used Masonite for the table and just enlarged the holes.

(2) Mine is about 30" wide and 24" deep.

(3) I put solid sides on it that go up about 10". That lets me mount storage for bits for the rotary carvers, and shelves for the carvers. Too, I put foam pipe insulation on the back and because I can lift the sides and back, I can stick things out the back, resting on the foam, while sanding and carving them.

(4) I have a shelf on the bottom that both stiffens the beast and gives me a another horizontal surface to decorate with shop needs.

(5) The yellow nylon cover was the prototype cover, and is still prototyping about seven years down the road. :cool:
 

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I just built one recently. I haven’t used it too much yet but I am fairly certain it will pay dividends over time. It’s not pictured but there is a slanted bottom underneath that slants towards the suction outlet. The top is obviously pegboard. Cutting that stuff in the shop is super messy. I might put a pegboard hook in the corner to make removing the lid easier to clean it. Its one more thing to store but it stacks pretty easily with other stuff due to its shape.
Table Computer desk Wood Desk Audio equipment
 

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David - Machinist in wood
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I just built one recently. I haven’t used it too much yet but I am fairly certain it will pay dividends over time. It’s not pictured but there is a slanted bottom underneath that slants towards the suction outlet. The top is obviously pegboard. Cutting that stuff in the shop is super messy. I might put a pegboard hook in the corner to make removing the lid easier to clean it. Its one more thing to store but it stacks pretty easily with other stuff due to its shape.
View attachment 404014
Nice. Looks a lot like mine. :)
 

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David - Machinist in wood
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Funny, I did base it off a youtube video but not that one. Whoever I copied - thank you! Anything that helps with dust…
Hey, as long as it works, right!!
 

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Mine has the slant for the same reasons.

The one big change I'd make it, being able to lift the front up, IF something important fell down one of the holes. As it is, I have to go behind, pull the hose and reach through the 4" port.

If storage is a problem, think about quick, collapsible sides, back and top to control air flow to come, primarily, from where you are working. It could be via pivoting posts in the corners and just painter's plastic that drapes over them. They could be locked on dowel screws with threads for jig knobs.

It really is a game changer (having the sides, back and top). One as big as going from not having the table to having it.

I just built one recently. I haven’t used it too much yet but I am fairly certain it will pay dividends over time. It’s not pictured but there is a slanted bottom underneath that slants towards the suction outlet. The top is obviously pegboard. Cutting that stuff in the shop is super messy. I might put a pegboard hook in the corner to make removing the lid easier to clean it. Its one more thing to store but it stacks pretty easily with other stuff due to its shape.
 
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