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Looks like Herb showed a great set up pic, never had much luck with my bit using plywood.
I am building some drawers right now and first I tried the lock miter bit on the BB sides and it gave me terrible tear out on the bottom face of the board i.e. the face laying down on the router table top.. So I went to the drawer lock bit and it was the same, so ended up putting my dado blade on the TS and that worked great making a rabbet. I usually use solid wood for drawer sides, just never have good luck with BB plywood with dovetails,box joints ,lock miters,or drawer lock bits. Rabbets on TS are no problem.
Herb
 

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Just finished 100 22x22" shop drawers of various heights with the Whiteside bit (1/2 ply, B/C, normal big box quality). Comments:

Pros:
- Nice joint with occasional tear out. Use a sacrificial pushblock to avoid tear out on back of cut. Typically the tear out was in the middle of the cut, so it glues up ok and isn't visible.
- Easy glue up. I used ratcheting straps with outside rounded-over corner block (x4), pulled up nicely and completely. Was able to glue 8 drawers at time (I'm cheap, only 8 ratchet straps, which have gotten spendy).
- Strong glue-only joint, looks nice, covers the drawer dados completely.
- Protip: the Rockler Silicone glue brush is genius for this, quick and easy glue spreading, easy cleanup, even if you 'forget'.

Cons:
- The Whiteside bit is a 2 setup bit, one for fronts and another (fence only) for sides. Not a huge con as the depth is the same for both.
- Tedious to rout each side of all joints (100 drawers x 8 = 800 router passes)
 

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Just finished 100 22x22" shop drawers of various heights with the Whiteside bit (1/2 ply, B/C, normal big box quality). Comments:

Pros:
- Nice joint with occasional tear out. Use a sacrificial pushblock to avoid tear out on back of cut. Typically the tear out was in the middle of the cut, so it glues up ok and isn't visible.
- Easy glue up. I used ratcheting straps with outside rounded-over corner block (x4), pulled up nicely and completely. Was able to glue 8 drawers at time (I'm cheap, only 8 ratchet straps, which have gotten spendy).
- Strong glue-only joint, looks nice, covers the drawer dados completely.
- Protip: the Rockler Silicone glue brush is genius for this, quick and easy glue spreading, easy cleanup, even if you 'forget'.

Cons:
- The Whiteside bit is a 2 setup bit, one for fronts and another (fence only) for sides. Not a huge con as the depth is the same for both.
- Tedious to rout each side of all joints (100 drawers x 8 = 800 router passes)
The problem I had was on the board lieing face down on the router table ,it was backed up on back edge. In the center of the cut the face of the plywood was ripped out,the back edge was fine ,no tear out there. No tear out in solid wood sides and backs/fronts.

If I was doing production, I would use a rabbet bit or saw blade.

Herb
 

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Just finished 100 22x22" shop drawers of various heights with the Whiteside bit (1/2 ply, B/C, normal big box quality). Comments:

Pros:
- Nice joint with occasional tear out. Use a sacrificial pushblock to avoid tear out on back of cut. Typically the tear out was in the middle of the cut, so it glues up ok and isn't visible.
- Easy glue up. I used ratcheting straps with outside rounded-over corner block (x4), pulled up nicely and completely. Was able to glue 8 drawers at time (I'm cheap, only 8 ratchet straps, which have gotten spendy).
- Strong glue-only joint, looks nice, covers the drawer dados completely.
- Protip: the Rockler Silicone glue brush is genius for this, quick and easy glue spreading, easy cleanup, even if you 'forget'.

Cons:
- The Whiteside bit is a 2 setup bit, one for fronts and another (fence only) for sides. Not a huge con as the depth is the same for both.
- Tedious to rout each side of all joints (100 drawers x 8 = 800 router passes)
thanks...
 

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Hmm, not sure how you cut it facedown with this type of bit (the Freud like shown above or the Whiteside). With either the large or small version the drawer outsides of the front and side are away from the bit (front/back face up, sides face out away from bit) so don't really have a chance to tear out. What version of a drawer lock bit were you using (there are various)?
 

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You might want to check out the Sommerfeld Easy Set jig for Freud bits. It is made for the larger lock bit. I'd email or call them to double check compatibility with that particular bit. The jig allows you to set it for the exact thickness of the pieces you're joining. For $30 it can make your life easier. https://sommerfeldtools.com/easy-set-for-freud-bits. It's the red, not the yellow jig. You measure and dial in the thickness, then the bit height is automatic.
 

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