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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not sure if this is allowed, so if inappropriate please remove...

I have a Wen 4210 drill press. I've been using it to polish scroll projects over the past several weeks.

I went to drill some holes with hole saw blades the other day (you may remember the shop vac project with the circle cutting jig), and the chuck kept falling out.

I hammered it back in but after every hole cut, the chuck would fall out.

I was told it might be the bearings, or dirt. I've cleaned the shaft but not the inside. I don't see how bearings could be the problem, but then again I'm not too mechanically inclined.

Does anyone know what else would cause this?

Thanks as always in advance
 

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Hi, Jessie; why wouldn't it be allowed?
Just to be clear, the chuck is mounted on a tapered shaft that fits into the quill on the drill press(?).
That would be the normal method but I have no idea how WEN's are designed.
Once the Morse taper is pushed up into the quill, you normally need to insert a special device...sort of a wedge thing...into a hole in the quill to get the Morse taper back out. Falling out might happen if you put a lot of sideways pressure on the chuck. Other than that, hopefully someone else has some thoughts. I think quite a few of the members have WEN drill presses.
 

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What Dan said is correct. My milling machine also has a threaded rod that extends through the quill and screws into the end of the chuck arbor. I don't think there's one on my DP. I think it's just a friction fit. Check for burrs on the chuck arbor and then wipe the inside of the quill out with some solvent to make sure there's no grease or varnish that might have been put in at the factory to prevent corrosion. Then put the chuck in and press down really hard on a board.
 
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what dan said is correct. My milling machine also has a threaded rod that extends through the quill and screws into the end of the chuck arbor. I don't think there's one on my dp. I think it's just a friction fit. Check for burrs on the chuck arbor and then wipe the inside of the quill out with some solvent to make sure there's no grease or varnish that might have been put in at the factory to prevent corrosion. Then put the chuck in and press down really hard on a board.
careful you don't wash the lubricant out of the jaws
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Thanks all for the responses...

Hi, Jessie; why wouldn't it be allowed?
Just to be clear, the chuck is mounted on a tapered shaft that fits into the quill on the drill press(?).
That would be the normal method but I have no idea how WEN's are designed.
Once the Morse taper is pushed up into the quill, you normally need to insert a special device...sort of a wedge thing...into a hole in the quill to get the Morse taper back out. Falling out might happen if you put a lot of sideways pressure on the chuck. Other than that, hopefully someone else has some thoughts. I think quite a few of the members have WEN drill presses.
Not allowed because it doesn't have to do with Routing in any way. Some forums frown on extra postings not related to the sites main topic so I try to preface off topic posts just in case...

The Wen does not have an insert, screw or anything to hold the chuck in. You simply hammer it in.

Here are the instructions for installing the chuck - hopefully you can read them


https://www.routerforums.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=382497&thumb=1

Thanks as always in advance
 

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I have a Wen 4210 drill press. I've been using it to polish scroll projects over the past several weeks.

DaninVan may have hit it on the head...

If you're polishing and using sideways pressure, it might just slip because of the taper and sideways force...
 

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I would think that either the quill or the chuck is worn. Given the fact that you would probably never need to put a new chuck on (unless of course the one you have is worn and are willing to pay for a new one) I would put a lot of red Loctite on the quill and hope that solves the problem forever.
 

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"Not allowed because it doesn't have to do with Routing in any way. Some forums frown on extra postings not related to the sites main topic so I try to preface off topic posts just in case..."
-Jessie
When you start a thread (ask a question) you normally would post it under one of the Forum categories that you think is most appropriate for the topic, if you're not sure, just post it in the 'Lobby'.
One of the mods might move it for you, but it's not a big deal.
The Lobby is a freewheeling circus... :)
 

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careful you don't wash the lubricant out of the jaws
Not talking about the chuck but the tapered socket in the quill that the Jacobs or Morse taper fits into.

Questions like this are fine. It's in Tools and Woodworking sub forum which is also good. You usually need other tools besides a router to make things and most of us are tool junkies anyway so we're good with questions like these.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I would think that either the quill or the chuck is worn. Given the fact that you would probably never need to put a new chuck on (unless of course the one you have is worn and are willing to pay for a new one) I would put a lot of red Loctite on the quill and hope that solves the problem forever.
@mgmine

Thanks but...

Wouldn't that make it permanent and not able to change the chuck if needed?
 

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DaninVan may have hit it on the head...

If you're polishing and using sideways pressure, it might just slip because of the taper and sideways force...
I'm no expert on drill presses although I've had one for years and use it frequently. I have read stories about people using a drill press in such a way that it puts a horizontal or sideways force on the shaft. This is a bending force. Drill presses are designed for downward or a compression force. Too much sideways force (don't know how much that is) for too long (don't know how much that is either) can knock something out of round and turn it into an oval. If that happens you may get a vibration or excessive run out or, possibly, the chuck falling out. If all else fails, you may have to take it to a repair shop. However, doing that might cost more than buying a new drill press. Sorry I can't make any other suggestions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm no expert on drill presses although I've had one for years and use it frequently. I have read stories about people using a drill press in such a way that it puts a horizontal or sideways force on the shaft. This is a bending force. Drill presses are designed for downward or a compression force. Too much sideways force (don't know how much that is) for too long (don't know how much that is either) can knock something out of round and turn it into an oval. If that happens you may get a vibration or excessive run out or, possibly, the chuck falling out. If all else fails, you may have to take it to a repair shop. However, doing that might cost more than buying a new drill press. Sorry I can't make any other suggestions.
Thanks @Barry747

That's kind of what I'm afraid of as well. I've used it for sanding and polishing and those tasks both put sideways pressure on the shaft. I guess I can check the shaft to see if it is perfectly round or has a high spot?
 

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It is not clear to me if it is the long taper that goes up into the Quilll shaft, or the short taper that goes into the back of the chuck. I have used my drill presses for years as wire brush wheels to brush rust off of metal and as buffing wheels to buff out projects and never had that happen on any of them.
One note, don't use a hammer to set the chuck, use down pressure against a block of wood.
Just Saying,
HErb
 

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I've heard of heavy sideways pressure on the quill affecting the bearings as they are designed for downward thrust and and not sideways torque but I haven't heard that affecting the fit of the tapers messing together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It is not clear to me if it is the long taper that goes up into the Quilll shaft, or the short taper that goes into the back of the chuck. I have used my drill presses for years as wire brush wheels to brush rust off of metal and as buffing wheels to buff out projects and never had that happen on any of them.
One note, don't use a hammer to set the chuck, use down pressure against a block of wood.
Just Saying,
HErb
Yes, I have a block of wood I use as a sacrifice when drilling to hammer it back in.

Someone suggested sanding the shaft slightly.

Another note is that I used it yesterday to drill some holes in a new project and it was fine. It seems to happen mostly when drilling large holes with hole saw bits.

Thanks all for the the responses, I'm trying all of them
 

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don't sand...
polish...
 
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@mgmine

Thanks but...

Wouldn't that make it permanent and not able to change the chuck if needed?
No, but with red, you would need to use heat. The question is when is the last time that you replaced a chuck? I have never had to replace one. The only time I've removed them is when I found a drill in the garbage and thought that at some time in the future I could use a chuck. So far it has never happened. If your chuck is worn then this is the time you have to replace it. You could always try a replacement and if that doesn't work then go the Loctite route. You could also replace te quill but how much time and money do you want to spend when you could pick up a used WEN for $50 dollars?
 

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No, but with red, you would need to use heat. The question is when is the last time that you replaced a chuck? I have never had to replace one.
blue will work just as well as the red but w/o the potential hassles...
 
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Wen Drill presses are fairly new on the market, this should not be happening. I would get a hold of their service dept, maybe the taper is faulty. When I worked in a machine shop we removed the chucks quite often to use larger drill bits with a MT shank to drill metal. I know a person who just bought a wen drill press that removed the chuck and installed a keyless aftermarket chuck, not because the jacops type chuck was faulty,because he liked the keyless better.
Herb
 
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