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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently bought a kit to build the 18" V-Drum Sander from Stockroom Supply. The kit comes with a velcro drum and bushings, some rolls of velcro backed paper, 2 pulleys and a link belt. In most cases you would have to provide or buy a 1/4hp motor, but I built mine to work with my Shopsmith. You can buy the materials needed to build the box and top from them but I drew up a plan on Sketchup for the box and top and built my own.
The base is just a box with a hole for dust collection. I used pocket hole screws and glue to assemble the box. The hardest part of the whole project was figuring out how to put the slot in the top for the drum.

More pics in next post....
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)

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Nice. Great engineering.
I never thought of using a shop smith to power other tools like you did.
Opens up lots of ideas.
is the drive Pulley a shop smith attachment?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Nice. Great engineering.
I never thought of using a shop smith to power other tools like you did.
Opens up lots of ideas.
is the drive Pulley a shop smith attachment?
No. Shopsmith has a ton of attachments, but that's not one of them. The shaft on the Shopsmith is 5/8" and the balanced pulleys that came with the sander kit are 1/2", so I had to get a 5/8 to 1/2 work arbor from Woodcraft (http://www.woodcraft.com/product.aspx?ProductID=01V11&FamilyID=894) for 5.99 to make the transition. The Shopsmith actually has 3 PTO's to run the special purpose tools available, like the band saw, planer, jointer, etc.
If you want to know more about a Shopsmith you can go to http://www.shopsmith.com/ownersite/index.htm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Nice job George

Once you take it for a test ride let me know what you think about it, I was not to happy with the one I made :(

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Bj, so far I think I am going to like it. Once I got the table set up the correct height from the drum, it works great. According to the site, for proper set up, use the 220 grit paper on the drum and set it to about 1/32" or less below the top surface. Just enough to where if you run a straight edge over the drum it will not touch it. This setting will take a very light cut, so to take more off you just change to a bigger grit paper. Using the Velcro backed paper allows it to actually raise a fraction off the drum so that you aren't pinching the paper between the work and the drum like most other sanders.
 

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Hi Steve

For my small part I would say NO,and NO, to your questions :(


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These posts are all at least one year old after some use do you like the unit, would you buy it again?
 

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Deb,
Mine is over a year old. I use it on nearly every project.
It replaces (and, I mean REPLACES) a Performax.
I have come to rely on it a lot for both flattening of inlays and smoothing edges.
 

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Ive never used or seen one in person but the first concern that came to mind is the fact that my hands would be exerting downward force on the wood and if this thing happened to decide to snag the wood and zing it off the table that all that force that I was using to hold the wood flat against the table would now be shoving my hands down on the spinning sanding drum, has this ever been an issue? Now i understand push pads etc but lets face it the majority of us are not known for actually grabbing them things and using them.
 

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Paul,
Not to worry. The sanding surface is adjusted to be about 1/32nd below the table. The rotation of the platen raises the velcro backed sand paper to meet the wood.
To maintain consistency, I made finger board hold downs for each end of the platen.
I've never had the drum catch the wood and pull it through or, back at me. I always feed opposite of the drum rotation.
 

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In a previous post (listed below) I asked opinions on how to do the top, so this is what I came up with. If you want to see what part of the Sketchup plan looks like see this post...

http://www.routerforums.com/tools-woodworking/10074-how-would-you-do.html
Yup George:

That's pretty much got it. You're supposed to put it over your table saw blade set at 35-45 degree angle and raise the blade. I chickened out and merely cut a 45 down the middle and now I have two sides that open for changing grits. I use a fence to lock the top perfectly flat. I also built a "bit" of adjustment into the height of the drum. Works like a charm. Fine adjusting tool ready.

Deb, you should have seen this at the Woodstock Woodworking show. You're also about an hour's drive from their "location" just up behind Smithville. They have a full line of abrasives etc.
 

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Hi Deb

Save your money up and get a real surface sander, they are almost as good as a planer. it's almost like using your router to get the stock flat , not the right tool for the job and the planer will do the job better all day long, you can find good used ones :) "surface sander"

I can show you the water but I can't make you drink :)


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I've been looking at these for a long while now. Still hesitant to take the plunge. Thanks for the updates!
 

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BJ I have looked at many surface sanders... the problem is space. Those units are large (even the samll ones). I need something I can tuck away some where when not in use.
Ron I have seen these units at the wood shows several times. I came close to pulling the trigger in Woodstock, but I would probably save a few dollars and build my own unit with their roller and parts. My main hesitation comes from thinking the few parts they are actually selling you are a bit over priced.
The other feedback I am looking for from people who own these units is about the consistancy of the cuts. I realize it is a VERY small amount of surface that is actually being removed with these sanders, but can you actually get FLAT surfaces with it? It would seem to need some sort of hold down for consistancy??? Gene you mentions finger boards, I would love to see a picture of your set up.
 
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