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One of the messiest jobs is sanding drywall. There is an easy way to eliminate most of the mess: use water bath filtration with your shop vac. I found this Sand and Kleen Jr kit at a yard sale for $10. It uses sanding screens for fast cutting and your vacuum pulls virtually all the dust into the water bath where it is captured. It works very well and they offer larger models for big jobs. Clean up is easy, just dump and rinse the bucket. It would not be difficult to build your own version of this tool.
 

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Great idea. I wonder if you could put water in your shop vac and do the same thing. I have a Ridgid vac and I know you can clean up water from a floor or what ever.
 

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By the way Mike you come up with some good things to help us do what we need to do and I appreciate it.
 

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Don, if you rigged a pipe inside the vacuum from the inlet port to below the water level it would work. I think it is better to modify a bucket for this; much easier to clean up.
 

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Wish I knew about this about a week ago lol . Actually I've got lots left yet . Just gotta find one .
Right now I'm using a shop vac with the inside bag plus the upper filter
 

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Mike , so I guess the pick up tube that goes to the sander goes in the water, and the one going to vac is at the top so it doesn't draw water in the vac. Could you possibly post a pic with the underside of the lid and dimensions .
Thanks
 

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Magna Sand & Kleen

Thanks Mike...looks like a very handy tool.

I checked on Amazon.com and it runs $117 U.S. Add in the shipping & tax for us beleaguered Canadians and it ends up costing $218.

On Amazon.ca, it's about $157 Presumably plus tax, but free shipping.

I sure wouldn't mind having one of these, as I will be doing the entire house very shortly. Anything to help alleviate the mess is going to be more than welcome.

If any of you Canucks have found one north of the border...let us know. Thanks.
 

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We used the plain-Jane Shop Vac system for years. Clients really appreciated the vastly reduced dust problem (using a ShopVac sander) created by drywall sanding. Most of our customers had heard horror stories from others who'd had reno's done, and where the contractor had done little or nothing to protect the customers' homes and possessions. It just doesn't have to be that bad.
First step is dust barriers in every doorway...confine the dust to the room you're working in. Alternatively, move everything in the house out into storage. You can't eliminate all the dust.
When you fill, don't leave globs of mud on the area you're mudding; it should be flat and clean with a feather edge. depressions in the mud don't matter...you'll catch them with your next or final coat. If you aren't a pro at filling, count on doing three coats not two.
Don't try and sand down the first coat; you only need to do a couple of passes with 100grit, to knock off any high spots and bits sticking up.
That's the trick with sanding; you're only trying to remove the high spots, not take it down to the level of the lowest areas. I've seen guys put on a bucket of mud, then sand it down to the point that most of it's sitting on the floor!
Buy finish mud for your final coat; you'll be a lot happier mudder. The final sanding is referred to as 'polishing'...220grit A light touch!!!
Here's the rub...no pun intended. The screens for vacuum sanding have a nasty tendency to leave scratches, unlike paper or sanding sponges.
If I'm doing small repairs, I just sand with a fine sanding sponge and hold the Shop Vac nozzle right under where I'm actually sanding. That's extremely effective.
Also, if there's forced air heating, cover both the cold air returns and the registers with poly; turn the furnace off. Having the ducts cleaned is a p.i.t.a.
Good luck!
Oh, and if you're over 50, take a *Vitamin I before starting a big sanding project! ;)


* Ibuprofen
 

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Thanks Mike. Sounds like a good idea to minimize sanding dust.

I have a Dust Deputy hooked up to my shop vac. The hose is connected via pvc piping to the miter saw, bench top belt sander, and a port which I hook up a hose for the ROS, and the router table. It does a pretty good job of capturing everything that goes through the hose. It simply drops out into the bucket.

I checked the shop vac last week and the internal bag was empty and the filter looked factory fresh! :) If you have one, it could be a good alternative...and no water needed.

BTW, I hate sanding of any kind! :surprise::surprise::surprise:
 

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I use the cyclone to capture the dust...but a lot always get's through.

I've tried the inlet in the water trick and the water gets kicked up so much that dust and water gets in the vac hose and settles...then you have to beat it out. (Funny...doesn't happen on the other thing)

I also found that once the initial dust layer sits on the water surface, the rest goes into the shop-vac anyway and becomes less and less effective...

Most effective I have found is dry vacuuming and not using the mesh papers...leaves scratches as Dan pointed out.

An ROS connected to a shop-vac is ok but ya can't beat good mudding and little sanding...

A real mudder (as he called himself) once told me "if you have to sand, you put on too much"...he used to finish the last coat by dipping the knife in water...I never got that good (I'm sure he was exaggerating). :)


Good find on the bucket and pad...always looking for ways to beat down the dust...
 

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I removed the popcorn crap on the ceiling in the MBR. I started out with the hand sander but bought a Dewalt electric sander that hooks to the Shop Vac. I used the bags to collect the dust. Hand sander was a bit hard on the back with sanding overhead for several hours. Dewalt sander was much quicker, too.
 

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"A real mudder (as he called himself) once told me "if you have to sand, you put on too much"...he used to finish the last coat by dipping the knife in water...I never got that good (I'm sure he was exaggerating). "
-Nick

Amen! And no, he wasn't exaggerating. Doesn't work that well in the corners though.
All this is old school anyway. With machine taping it's a moot discussion.
 

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"...learn to do do better mudding..."
That would suggest that folks that didn't want to do it in the first place should do MORE of it! Heheheheh

Remember that old song, 'Hello Mudder Hello Fadder' ?
 

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Yes, I've done just enough drywall and mud to know that I dislike it... A LOT!! And yes, I'm one of those "over mudders" kind of people. I did try to correct that when I did my bathroom, but it's a difficult habit to break. I have a sander that connects to my shopvac, and while it did cut down on the dust, it just about killed the shopvac. I don't think there is a fine enough filter to stop ALL of that dust. I'm familiar with the water filter concept, but never used it.
 

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Dan I am pretty much doing exactly as your saying . I have a piece of plastic over the hallway opening , plus I hold the nozzle of my shop vac underneith my sanding block as am sanding .
I'm using two filter systems in my shop vac, the bag and the upper filter which is a 1 micron version
 

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"A real mudder (as he called himself) once told me "if you have to sand, you put on too much"...he used to finish the last coat by dipping the knife in water...I never got that good (I'm sure he was exaggerating). "
-Nick

Amen! And no, he wasn't exaggerating. Doesn't work that well in the corners though.
All this is old school anyway. With machine taping it's a moot discussion.
I went to heavy on my first coat , but I'm going to light on the next ones as the taping and corner beads are done , so I'm just filling in small valleys .
I'm sure it will take me more than three coats , but I don't really care as I'm not on a rush and I want a good outcome
 
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