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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a Rousseau base plate for the table i am building.

I hear the term "sub base" and I don't know if it refers to the base plate that came on the Router, and if I am supposed to mount the Rousseau plate over that one or remove it and mount the Rousseau plate alone?

I assumed that the Rousseau plate replaced the old one, but then the term "sub-base" threw me...

:(
 

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It usually refers to the black phenolic plastic one attached to the base. You need to take it off to mount the Rousseau or most other bases. In some cases you may need to find longer machine screws to attach the new one with as they are thicker than the black plastic one that comes on the router.
 

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If as Vince says you need to drill the holes in the Rousseau to mount to your router then start a new thread asking about that. There are some tips we can give you to mount it correctly. You want to get it centered to the router armature so that you can use it with guide bushings.
 
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Theo
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
... There are some tips we can give you to mount it correctly. You want to get it centered to the router armature so that you can use it with guide bushings.
Just came in from finishing the job of mounting plate to Router and also mounting plate in Table.

Bought both the centering kit and the table install kit. In a rare instance, I actually read the instructions, measured-twice-and-cut-once, and both jobs came out almost 100% dead on. :grin: (this rarely happens!)

The one hole I did mis-align was the access hole for fine adjusting above the table, but it still works.

First projects:
Table insert
Perfect Dado Jig
Circle Jig
Finger Joint Jigs
 

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Theo
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That may be the case, but, every question asked is a teaching opportunity. I have found that there are more dumb answers than dumb questions.
Would you count, "What the #$%^ were you thinking when you asked that?", as a dumb answer, or as a teaching opportunity? Hehehe Believe, me there are days when that is the best answer possible. Than you go and bang your head against a wall. Ah, the good old days, great times with great days.
 

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Mike
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My father always said the only dumb question was the one not asked.
The dumb question will always be dumb if it is not asked because it never learns the answer to the question.
 

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A lot of those questions were ones we asked way back when we were just starting.
 

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Would you count, "What the #$%^ were you thinking when you asked that?", as a dumb answer, or as a teaching opportunity? Hehehe Believe, me there are days when that is the best answer possible. Than you go and bang your head against a wall. Ah, the good old days, great times with great days.
Well, if you left the "#$%" out of that answer, and actually wanted to know what the person was thinking in order to determine their thought process when they "asked that", then it could be a teaching opportunity.

However, it's still a teaching opportunity - for the person who supplied that answer. See, that type of response might dissuade the other person from ever asking another question and that wouldn't be good.

So, yes, both teaching opportunities.
 
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