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Discussion Starter #1
I spoke with the support team at Incra. They made a couple of great recommendations for the clean sweep system to work for my new Incra Table.

They suggest a smaller dust extractor portable unit with a minimum of 400 CFM. I found a 600 CFM unit online.

Here’s a Myth Buster. As long as your using, the Incra CleanSweep insets 4 inch hose and a unit dust collector with 400 CFM plus, You’ll never burn up a router with the Incra CleanSweep system. The CleanSweep cools the router with it’s funnel design.

Incra has tested the unit with every router model that will fit the CleanSweep. As long as you have sufficient airflow it will never cause overheating.
 

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Hello!
Never did burn a router.
I can vouch this big extractor moves a lot of air !

And then the bag will blow the fine dust airborne.
As the fine dust is the more dangerous this is a real Killer!

Regards.
Gérard
 

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Gerard may have a point about the fine particles.

Steve, those guys also sell a unit where the bag could be replaced with a filter. The filters are costly though. That unit may be a better choice so that you have the option. Plus it looks easier to clean out with the bottom plastic bag getting most of the sawdust.

Collector:
https://www.busybeetools.com/products/dust-collector-1hp-570cfm-1-mic-bag-csa-ct053.html

Optional Filter:
https://www.busybeetools.com/products/canister-filter-1micron-1hp-dc.html
 

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And then the bag will blow the fine dust airborne.
As the fine dust is the more dangerous this is a real Killer!

Regards.
Gérard
That's exactly what my system does. It's a dust redistributor. I haven't had a chance to modify it yet to capture the fine particles.

A router sucks air from it's top end and blows it out at the bit end. This keeps it from picking up dust and debris and heat from the cutter and sending it up through the windings. So any DC system that sucks air from above the table or from the area between the router motor and the bit will help cool it by increasing the airflow going through the router.

Any system trying to pull air down past the router will probably cause it to run hotter. I worked in a fireplace mantle factory for a while in Edmonton that had a big Malita in a router table that was essentially just a large box. After about 1/2hr to an hour I could feel the router getting hot through the walls of the box so it was working against the router's cooling design.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
To show you how bad those bags leak. Smack the bag with the dust collector going and watch the dust fly. I changed my Jet filter bag out for the top mounted filter.

CAD-Man
Craftex is a pretty well known dust collection. It’s bandage solution until I upgrade the power box in my garage. I’ll take a look at an upgraded bag. Like the blades they give with most saws, you probably have to upgrade the standard bag.
 

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Dust collection is a serious matter. If you inhale really find sawdust deep into your lungs, much of it will stay there. That's why so many retired carpenters have COPD. The bags are a lousy solution unless they are placed outside. IF the air is pulled through chip collector first, not as much will wind up in the bag.

But if your DC unit exhausts back into the shop, a bag is a terrible solution and you should pop for a Wynn or other canister filter that goes down to 1 micron. You can direct the air outside, but it will remove heated of AC air from the shop. But even with a good filter, there will still be some fine particles in the shop, so it is still critical to wear a mask when cutting even with a DC unit. BTW, the green DC unit is the same setup as mine. I occasionally have to blow compressed air through the exterior of the filter to get rid of the excess, or air stops flowing.

The last thing I've added in the shop is a filter box that runs for several hours after I leave the gradually catches most of the airborne dust. It hangs from the ceiling near a wall and creates a circular air flow. This is a WEN brand, which I found on sale for $100. You can tell when it's been running because the air is very clean.\\

EPA studies I've seen rank anateur woodworking shops as the most dangerout for air borne sawdust. Thre three pictures pretty much shows my system.
 

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I have a Grizzly 1.5 HP dust collector and it came with a 2.5 micron bag. As I understand it after dust gets caked on the inside of the bag it filters out even finer dust. I could be wrong about that. Seems like I read that somewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Most of the time I’m working outside in the summer months. I’ll be wearing a 3 3M respirator. It’s a little annoying they don’t offer specs on the dust bag. I would guess it’s a 2.5 micron.

Until I fix my garage, I won’t have space for a large unit.
 

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I recommend the Keen Products Dust Router that attaches to the bottom of the router plate in the router table. The Dust Router is connected to a shop vacuum and captures dust right at the bit and works with the flow of air that the router is producing with its built in fan pulling air from the top of the router motor through to the bit. A great companion to this is the INCRA 6-pc CleanSweep MagnaLOCK™ Ring Set which works with Incra router plates that accept magnalock rings. Part Number: CS-MLRINGSET.

The Dust Router is on sale on Amazon.
 

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Thats all good ideas!

IMHO:
Fine filtering like 1 micrometer is a must, and throwing air outside is better for
the worker, a small exchange room could be used for caloric exchanges,especially in
very cold places, an air air exchanger could save at least 50 % of caloric energy by
taking heat out of air before throwing it out.

Gérard
 

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Just a reminder...one micron is 1 millionth of a meter. Yeh right; try visualizing that. ;)
It requires a very good microscope !
That's why it flies in the air, and passes filters, and passes our lungs...

1 micrometer is very litle, a red blood cell has a diameter of about 7 micrometers!
An old optical microscope would not help me watching that! it is just limit for a red blood cell.

Gérard.
 
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