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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Wood Fraternity.


I like many of you do not have a purpose-built extract system in their workshop, in my case due to cost, so I decided to purchase individual units. One for my table saw and the other for my bandsaw. I knew the typical domestic vacuum would not suffix so went for the SIP bin one which at approx. £110 and was affordable. Looked on the world’s largest auction site and bought two knackered ones for £20 each. I will explain how I got them going later on.

They came with all adapters and hoses so as you can see on the table saw fitting was not a problem. I just cut a piece of 6mm ply cut a hole in it and attached it to the back of the dust collection plenum with a couple of quick release clamps and some window draught rubber seal. I used the clamps so I can inspect the plenum from time to time.

Now at this point getting power to the unit was a problem. My table saw is three phase and the vacuum single phase, so decided that I would like the vacuum to switch on and off with the action of the saw. So, opened the contractor which has three phases at 240v each giving a total accumulative 415 volts required for the saw motor. I just connected into one of the phases on the switch side to the saw motor (see photo. Phase is red, yellow and blue, brown to Vacuum) and fed it back through the isolator picking up an earth and neutral inside the isolator. Had to do this as with many three phase woodworking machines there is no neutral only phase and earth. And with my Wadkin saw this is the case, but when I originally wired the saw I installed a neutral and terminated it in the isolator for future use. I then installed a 13amp socket outlet under the isolator which becomes live every time I switch on the saw which I plugged my new knackered vacuum into, and it works a treat.

The reason I purchased broken vacuums is that there is only one moving part i.e. The motor. The most common fault is the brushes. On my bandsaw vacuum that's all that was wrong. £5 later and working perfectly. Table saw was a different kettle of fish. When I turned it on it shot sparks in every direction then blew the fuse. Stripped the motor down and removed the armature. Testing is easy, using a meter checked opposite copper plates and adjacent plates for residence. You don't have to know what the resistance is as long as they are all the same. Everything ok so far, last check. The inner steel shaft on the armature is insulated from the windings, it has a ceramic sleeve. Your meter must give an open circuit reading, that's where it went pear shaped i.e. Complete closed circuit. That told me I had a short to earth or neutral and the reason the fuse was blowing. Motor completely shot. You can't replace them as they are mated to the housing and balanced.

Phoned SIP. New motor £156, which I thought was strange as the vacuum was only £110. Decided to look for a second hand one on the world’s largest auction site again and found dozens of identical motors to mine. Apparently most vacuum manufacturers use the same motor. Price new delivered £12. I decided to push the boat out and buy the original Kenley one which comes c/w built in suppressor, auto overheat cut out and internal wired brushes. £18.

Wasn't sure at this point whether it would fit. So, with a lot of apprehension started. Found out all dimensions and hole fixings were identical. All the SIP brackets swapped over with no alterations and in about 30 mins my knackered vacuum was now an unknackered vacuum. Jobs a good one. It's a lot quieter and more powerful.

Now keeping a look out for more vacuums for my other machines.

Yours
Colin.
 

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Colin, I have the exact same sip machine, but its connected to ducting and blast gates.

How often do you run more than one machine at a time?
I have 5 outlets off the main pipe, in 63 mm tube, and it all works very well.
I run bandsaw, router table, sanding machine, mitre saw, and a floor vacuum hose, but only one at a time.
Unless you have your own estate up there, those machines take up a fair few foot of floor space.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi
Thanks for the interest. As far as room is concerned. I posted my workshop under the title (My other castle) where I posted my workshop photos. I don't have any problems as far as room is concerned. I think you are wise only running one machine at a time as the suction is quite good but would certainly drop off if other gates were opened. I eventually hope to have an individual vacuum for every machine.
 

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Nice solution. Any way to drop a chip collector or cyclone separator into your system to remove the bulk of the particles before the fan?

Someone here greatly eased the process of emptying their chip collector easier by inserting a plastic bag and making a chicken wire frame to hold it open against the vacuum. That way you don't have the sawdust flying as you dump out the container.
 
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