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So I called Byrd today and they sent me an email on what to try. It sure was different than I expected. If my computer skills are good enough I will post a copy of what was in the email. I started off with my sled in there and was getting snipe on the front end but not the back. After fiddling around a little I pulled the sled out and things are better. I didn't run much so time will tell. Here is what they said in the email.


Re: DW735 Snipe adjustmentO.K., if you raise the heightof the cutter unit all the way up and lookat the roller ends, you'll see that the roller bearing blocks are heldin with a bracket and two screws. The bracket sorta looks like this: |--------------------| | | <------ Bearing block |_______________|-------------\___________/--------------- <------- BracketThe bracket has a dip in the middle, and the bearing block onlymakes contact with this bracket at the ends of the dip. Thosecontact points are what I wanted to shim, to raise the rollers upa little bit. Why? I figured that if your making light cuts, the pressureof the deflecting roller rubber is enough to pull the wood through;you don't need the springs with their high pressure distorting the baseand causing snipe. The shims work really great and of course if you'retaking deeper cuts the spring come into play.Alright, nothing was taken apart, and I did one roller at a time.Crank the cutter head all the way up, and put blocks of woodunderneath the center of one roller. Lower the cutterhead and watchthe bearing blocks lift off the retaining bracket. When they seem to"top out", stop lowering. You can now shim the two rollerblocks.I had .020 sheet aluminum laying around that I bought from the borg,so I used that. I cut out small rectangles that fit the width of thebearing block. Then with a pair of needlenose pliers, bend a 90 tabat one end, making sure the tab is small enough to slide between thebearing block and retaining bracket. Then bend a 45 tab at the otherend, making sure that the remaining shim is slightly wider than theretaining bracket. Insert the shim, 90 tab first, and let it lay on thebracket. Then do the other bracket. Now raise the cutterhead, andthe shims will be sandwiched between the bearing block and bracket.Now bend the 45 to a 90 with a screwdriver. Repeat for the other roller.Yes, the shims aren't held in that well when the bearing block losescontact with them (when taking deep cuts), but mine haven't fallenout yet. If someone can suggest a more elegant idea, let us know
 

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Glad Byrd Was able to help. Sounds like they were familiar with the problem. Be nice if they would send out the work around with the cutters when they know it's going in a DW 735. Heck, they could even offer the shims. :wink:
There are a number of metal to metal adhesives, JB Weld is but one. Would that be workable?

I sorta suspected the rollers might have been part of the problem.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Glad Byrd Was able to help. Sounds like they were familiar with the problem. Be nice if they would send out the work around with the cutters when they know it's going in a DW 735. Heck, they could even offer the shims. :wink:
There are a number of metal to metal adhesives, JB Weld is but one. Would that be workable?

I sorta suspected the rollers might have been part of the problem.
I agree they should have included that in their manual. For shims I used aluminum from a soda can. I folded it over twice to make it four shims thick. When compressed it's about .025 thick.
 
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