Router Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I plan to enlarge a rabbit on the inside of a picture frame using a hand-held router and an edge guide against the OUTSIDE of the frame. Will this setup trap the workpiece between the bit and guide?

I know this is a no-no on my router table.

Also, what is proper feed direction?

Thanks,
Phil
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
use a bearing guided bit instead.cut from the inside...
there a boatload of sizes nd configuration available to you....
make sure the router is supported and won't ''rock'' as you cut...
make sure the work piece can't move...


.


.
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: Semipro

·
Super Moderator
John
Joined
·
6,838 Posts
Phil
agree with Stick here is a video may help. just change bearing size for depth

 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Hi Phil and welcome. Yes that will be trapped. Go with Sticks method, it has no risk involved. Feed direction is clockwise.
 

·
Official Greeter
Ross
Joined
·
8,329 Posts
Welcome to the forum Phil.
 

·
Official Greeter
Joined
·
18,742 Posts
G'day Phil, welcome to the forum...

I think your query has been answered....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,238 Posts
I would prefer to make that on a table, depending somewhat on the stock. If you're using fairly thin stock, then I'd rather afix a second strip to the back of it, making it wide enough to form the rabbit. If you are shaping your own stock, then I'd almost certainly cut the rabbit on a table, and after shaping the piece, but before finishing it. I prefer working with pre finished stock before cutting the miters to prevent glue squeeze out from messing up the finish.

The problem I see with freehand cutting a rabbit is that the slightest bobble messes up the edge, which shows up when you put the canvas in.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
The beauty of using a bearing guided bit Tom is that it won't let you rabbet in too far. You can tip the router and make a small divot but that is easily eliminated by putting a piece the same thickness on the table to hold up the other side of the router. When I'm routing something like that I`ll make the initial pass and then usually a second one to make sure I have a clean even cut.

With the OP`s original plan there is nothing to prevent the bit from wandering inward and making the rabbet too wide since the edge control is on the opposite side from the bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks a lot guys!
I couldn't find my edge guide manual(s), and an online search didn't work either. Any links to edge guide procedures would be appreciated.
So, back to the bearing guided bit!

P.S. The frame is about 6 ft. by 7ft. and the "canvas" isn't quite square either.

Phil
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
what brand router do you have...
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Phil a few members have modified their edge guides so that there is a guide for both sides of your work piece. In that case your router is locked in a specific relation to the work and can`t wander and it would be possible to do what you suggested until you got to a corner. The double edge guide works very well for cutting a groove in a board (a channel for something) for example where you need to do it handheld and it will work just as well as doing it on a router table with feather boards.

The beauty of using a bearing guided bit is that it is much simpler and will get you right into the corner except as the radius of the bit allows. You would still have to square the corner with a chisel and the only way to eliminate that is to route the rabbets before you assemble the frame.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Stick,

I have a Milwaukee 5616-24 w/ plunge & fixed bases - the fixed base in a router table. I've recently added a DeWALT DWP611 compact router w/ both bases. I have edge guides for both routers.

I use the table mounted Milwaukee and bearing guided bit as shown above for most work. My frame modification is off-site, so I thought the DeWalt would be more portable. Thanks to your prompt advise, I'll be using my usual bearing guided bit!!!
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top