Router Forums banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi - Just purchased a used Bosch RA1181 benchtop table and installed a Bosch 1617 router. I planned on using this to edge joint boards. I've watched a few videos and have done some reading on the procedure and it seems pretty straight forward but each run of my test board leave inconsistencies. I'm assuming that its technique but not sure how/what to correct. I'm attaching pictures of my bit, table and test board.
398920
398921
398922
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Having trouble with editing my post - just wanted to add that I read a similar post and have made sure that the bit does not extend beyond the outfeed fence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm not sure what you're asking but the outfeed fence has a 1/16" shim. I just took another swing at it after closing the gap of the fence opening around the bit. Better but still getting that snipe on the last inch or so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,698 Posts
When jointing, you start with pressure applied on the infeed side, but you then must begin applying pressure on the outfeed side. The pressure on the outfeed side is what holds the cutter in the proper position. That snipe is possibly just you pushing against the infeed side.

When setting the fences for this operation, use a straight edge flush against the outfeed side, and move the fence until that straight edge "kisses" the cutter. Make sure the cutter is straight toward the front of the table so the straightedge is in contact with the full length of the outfeed fence.

Make sure your shim is exactly the same thickness the full length of the outfeed fence. I also agree that you need to make certain there is no warp on either fence. That could throw the piece out of position. Use the straight edge. If the fence segments are mdf, all it takes is a little moisture to make them bulge.

Finally, if you can't get rid of the snipe at the end, cut your pieces a little long and trim it down. You should also be careful of the grain direction. You don't want the cutter to enter the edge with the grain toward the cutter. That will cause chipouts as the cutter gouges. With the grain oriented away from the cutter, you will have far less chance of chipout. Hope that makes sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,310 Posts
Old playing cards work well for shims since they are very accurate in thickness. Just stack them to get the thickness needed. Even typing or printer paper works as very thin shims, but the thickness does vary some.

It appears to me that your outfeed fence isn't shimmed to perfectly match the amount that you are removing with each pass. It has to be exact to less than about 0.002" to not show up in the cut.

Charley
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the reply Charley. I like the playing card idea. In regards to the outfeed fence, are you seeing a correctable problem or suggesting that I measure the shim itself?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Hi - Just purchased a used Bosch RA1181 benchtop table and installed a Bosch 1617 router. I planned on using this to edge joint boards. I've watched a few videos and have done some reading on the procedure and it seems pretty straight forward but each run of my test board leave inconsistencies. I'm assuming that its technique but not sure how/what to correct. I'm attaching pictures of my bit, table and test board. View attachment 398920 View attachment 398921 View attachment 398922
Buy a good used Stanley Bailey 5 1/2 up to a size 8 and plane the surfaces. I use a number 7 myself. In the time it takes you to set up your system I can have 4 or 5 pieces edge jointed to within a half a thou.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Hi - Just purchased a used Bosch RA1181 benchtop table and installed a Bosch 1617 router. I planned on using this to edge joint boards. I've watched a few videos and have done some reading on the procedure and it seems pretty straight forward but each run of my test board leave inconsistencies. I'm assuming that its technique but not sure how/what to correct. I'm attaching pictures of my bit, table and test board. View attachment 398920 View attachment 398921 View attachment 398922
Yes, I've tried to do jointing on mine. I only got it to sorta work. You have to bump out the vertical board that's after the cutting. I used some strips of like cereal boxes. You need to have a difference between the before and after for the jointing to happen. But, I had trouble getting to line up well enough, along with the router boards being on the short side for jointing. BTW, just a straight cutter, not the one with the edger, is what you want.

I'll confess that I do my jointing using my table saw and planner, the router wasn't good enough. If I did want a better jointer, I'd be looking at a table top jointer, like the 8" Wahuda as a low end option. Good luck with whatever solution you come up with!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Buy a good used Stanley Bailey 5 1/2 up to a size 8 and plane the surfaces. I use a number 7 myself. In the time it takes you to set up your system I can have 4 or 5 pieces edge jointed to within a half a thou.
Yes, if you have a very sharp plane, you could get close. Not as good as a jointer, as the plane isn't very long, but I'd dare say it's better than doing it on your router table.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,244 Posts
All the advice above is correct. One thing I prefer is to use spiral endmills rather than bits with straight blades. The advantage of using a router table over a hand plane is the results are always square to the face of the board unless your router is poorly mounted or loosely mounted.
4D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Hi - Just purchased a used Bosch RA1181 benchtop table and installed a Bosch 1617 router. I planned on using this to edge joint boards. I've watched a few videos and have done some reading on the procedure and it seems pretty straight forward but each run of my test board leave inconsistencies. I'm assuming that its technique but not sure how/what to correct. I'm attaching pictures of my bit, table and test board. View attachment 398920 View attachment 398921 View attachment 398922
I have the same table and router and have used it a couple times for jointing. It is really just a jointer turned it's side. As with a jointer, the strategy you use depends on the flaws you are trying to correct, cup, twist , bow etc. The suggestions for avoiding snipe are part of that. The shims that come with the router table work really well and keep the two fences parallel, which is important. Remember jointing requires removing all the wood that is higher than the lowest spot.

If you take the suggestions to use a hand plane I suggest you practice a lot first including with the same type of wood. Once you have successfully jointed the scrap, sharpen the plane again then do your project. It's worth the effort to learn, but it will take longer than getting the router table to work. A lot longer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Is that plywood you’re trying to joint?

It’s all good advice so far. I admit that I have a 6” Delta jointer that I just love. I’ll also admit that I am a hand tool maven and the speed and efficiency of the hand planing suggestion often is true, depending on the size and quantities you need to joint. In your case, if you have a sharp and quality hand plane, then that’s the way to go with that dinky stick you’re working on.

About the router table: I have a 1617 and it’sa great router that easily handles 1/2” bits, so put that 1/4” bit aside and use a 3/4” diameter x 3” 1/2” bit, because it is a massively stiffer bit. It’s simply a much better bit than a 1/4” shafted bit. Generally speaking, that router easily handles the larger bits and I find that I get better results from the beefier bits, so that is what I mainly buy, unless there is a specific reason for me to use a 1/4” bit.

Someone briefly mentioned it, but the router jointing almost requires a feather board just past the cutter, and I would be inclined to use a hold-down too.

Lastly, and this is especially true if the shaft is 1/4”, you cannot take 1/4” passes and get a decent result with the router table, you’ll have to take 1/16” or less. I’ve not tried what you’re attempting, but I suspect 1/32” is a better number.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top