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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First post here but have utilized this site quite a bit, so thanks for all the help.

I have made a total of 33 shaker style doors/drawer faces for my kitchen. Rails / styles were cope and stick utilizing my router table, everything is assembled and sanded. Last two steps are Euro hinge holes and edge detail.

I've settled on using a 1/8" round over for the edge detail - my question is for someone without a lot of freehand router experience will this be more easily done on my Bosch router table, or just free hand using the bearing and fixed base on the router to guide? Also is there anyway to round over the corners of the doors ( they are 3/4" thick), can you run them against the fence on the router table with a sled to hold them straight, or better to just knock over the edge with a sanding block? Did a search on here but couldn't find any posts touching on the pros and cons of edge details on a table vs free routing.

Thanks.
 

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welcome N/A...
glad yur here...
I do this w/ a free handed trim router...
w/ that many doors/drawers sanding won't give you consistent results especially on end grain...
 

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I did my 1/8" edge details on the router table. If you're using a full size router it might be tipsy on the door edge....trim router probably better. To round the corners how about a corner radius template and flush trim bit....can do this on the router table.
Make the template to the radius you want on the door corner, double face tape it to the door....flush trim bit will transfer radius to door. If large radius band or jig saw bulk of corner waste.
 

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N/A; you didn't mention whether the doors will be on face frames or mounted Euro style, on the gable faces with Euro hinges?
If the latter, the doors will (should) be close fitting...maybe an 1/8" or less clearance...which causes issues when the doors swing out. In order for the back edges not to rub as the doors go though an arc, the edges are normally slightly relived on the back, ie. the angle from the front face over the edge is less than 90deg. To put it another way, if the front face measures say 20" across then the back face would be perhaps 19 3/4" .

A fully rounded edge would accomplish the same thing; maybe a 3/8"(?) roundover front and back...
Stick's a (retired) commercial cabinetmaker; I'm pretty sure he'll correct me... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for all the help guys, going to give it a shot on the router table, I only have a full size router and was concerned with being a bit tipsy. An edge radius template is exactly what I need thank you, I will build one of these.

Cabinet doors are to be mounted on face frames, with euro style overlay hinges.

Thanks again.
 

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maybe an 1/8" or less clearance...which causes issues when the doors swing out. In order for the back edges not to rub as the doors go though an arc, the edges are normally slightly relived on the back, ie. the angle from the front face over the edge is less than 90deg. To put it another way, if the front face measures say 20" across then the back face would be perhaps 19 3/4" .

A fully rounded edge would accomplish the same thing; maybe a 3/8"(?) roundover front and back...
1/16'' relief per door w/ a 1/8'' RO on the inside should do it and you'll still hold on to you aesthetics...
 

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I would probably go with the router table with that many doors. To hand rout them you would need to clamp, rout, rotate, clamp, rout, etc. No need for that on a table. Maybe with small profile and a trim router you could do it one handed. For easing the edge or really small round overs I just do it by hand. Remember to rout the end grain first.
 

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one of these and you won't need to clamp...
there will be no need to turn the doors either...
 

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Thanks for all the help guys, going to give it a shot on the router table, I only have a full size router and was concerned with being a bit tipsy. An edge radius template is exactly what I need thank you, I will build one of these.

Cabinet doors are to be mounted on face frames, with euro style overlay hinges.

Thanks again.
Another way to round the edges would be to clamp several doors together and stand them on edge and use a round over bit in the router table. With several doors clamped together it should make for a nice stable non-tip surface. This way you could do several at a time. Just another suggestion.
 

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just the vertical seam between two doors...
 

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Unless there's a vertical divider; they don't actually come close to each other. :nerd:
I think I just got lost in the translations some place...
 

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like so but I do mine fairly tight...
1/8'' gap for me is huge..
the mating seams are gaped 1/16'' on these doors are kanted 1/16'' and have 1/8'' RO on the back edge..
the doors are also a full 4/4thick...

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Seems to me I remember reading that a 5* slope on the door edge will give enough clearance between the door and dividers or stiles to open without rubbing. It's been a while since I did any inset doors I think.
 

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Sounds right to me, Charles. I'm looking at a loose commercial door as I speak, and the slight cant is noticeable but not extreme.
This manufactured door has only a portion of a largish roundover arc actually making the cut. In other words maybe(?) 45deg out of a 90deg segment.
What it really accomplishes is moving the rear edge inwards ...not possible for two adjacent doors to make contact.
 
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