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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi , I'm a newbie to this forum , and a newbie to routing . Despite being a woodworker of some description ( anything from guitars to boats) all my life , I've never owned a router until I picked up a little Elu 96/10 series 2 in a car boot sale , because I'd had an Elu planer for years (and it would still be going strong if some**** hadn't stolen it) and reckoned it would be a good quality tool.
But it has a nasty whine which I can only assume is bearings -so I need to replace them. It seems easy enough to get spares , but I can't work out how to go about taking the thing apart and I can't find any guides on the internet.
So I'm hoping someone out there can point me in the right direction , much appreciated if you can.
 

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From another forum elsewhere, but by our member mailee (with thanks):

mailee said:
Ok guys here it is for anyone who has the need to strip down the Elu router. I can only vouch for this being correct for the Elu 96MOF but I am sure most of the other clones will be about the same.

Well the top cover must come off first of course. Lift off the speed sensor from the posts where the screws locate. No need to remove the wires from this just let it hang over the side. Remove the brushes by undoing the two Phillips screws either side of them remove the plastic retainers then pull on the wires to lift out the brushes. Watch they dont spring out! Remove the wires from them and put to one side. Pull up and wiggle the small speed sensor pickup from the top of the shaft. (It is splined onto it)

Remove the phenolic baseplate carefully as this retains the return spring and lift out the spring from the right hand post. Unscrew the switch from the side of the router and jiggle it loose. (It is located with a lip into the bottom casing) plunge the router to full depth and below this you will see the top of the post with a circlip on. Remove this clip then lift the router casing off the base plate.

Now remove the four screws in the housing surrounding the bottom end of the armature shaft and remove the spindle lock housing oh and remove the collet and nut to allow the armature to slide through the hole. Now I removed the screw plate surrounding the end of the armature but I don't think there is any need to do this but remove the four screws holding the top of the motor casing to the alloy base and then pull and joggle the two apart.

Inside you will find the fan assembly and make a note of which way around this goes as it looks like it could fit back either way but in fact will only fit one way around. After the base is removed pull the armature from the upper casing and you will see the top bearing in place on the shaft.

I jury rigged a half moon affair to sit under the bearings while I gently tapped the shaft with a thin punch so as not to mushroom the end over with a thick cloth below ready to catch the armature. The bottom bearing is located in the lower casing and is held in place by four screws and a collar.

Remove the screws and then drift the bearing out from the front of the casing, (It does not matter drifting it on the inner race as it will be replaced) Drift the new one back in on the outer race of course with a socket of the right diameter and re-fit the collar and screws. drifting the upper bearing onto the shaft was done with a long BA socket located on the inner race and tapped gently down into place.

Rebuild of the router is a reversal of the disasembly and is straight forward with no hitches that I found. Replacing the brushes was a little fiddly as there isn't much room to get your fingers in but I found a pair of thin needle nosed pliers of help here. If you go to this site: Tool Shop Direct - Where Tools Cost Less and navigate to spare parts/elu woodworking/ routers/ MOF96E typeA you will find the spare parts and also an exploded diagram of the router which came in handy not having seen inside one before.

I paid around £16 for both of the bearings and delivery was quick. I must get in touch with them again myself as I need another fine height adjuster for my Trend clone. I can certainly recommend their service as I have used them on a few occasions now.

Oh and by the way I found that placing a piece of white paper on the bench and laying out all the parts in their respective locations helped a lot with the re-assembly.
From memory that all seems spot on (it's about 8 or 9 years since I needed to do one), but I'd add that the phenolic baseplate also retains the ball and spring detente for the turret which are easily lost. Please note these instructions are also a good guide for the deWalt DW613/DW614/DW615, Elu 3303/3304 (USA), Elu MOF96/MOF96e(aka MOF96-02), Black & Decker SR100, Trend T5, Perles OF808, AEG OF50 (not the later OFS50 which was a Metabo design), Virutex FR77C/FR78C, etc which are all basically similar having originally come out of either the Scintilla factory in Switzerland (AEG, Elu, some deWalt, B&D) or the Perles factory, although these days I understand they're made in Mexico, Italy or Eastern Europe depending on which on you have. The main difference will be the presence/absence of the speed controller/sensor depending if the model is variable or fixed speed and some variation in the design of the handles (ELU USA models)

Edit: Having posted this I've since had a look at both a MOF96-02 typ 2 and a MOF96 typ 1 and there are detail differences. Oli posted problems below, so I'll add to the above gen:

1. The typ 1 uses the baseplate to retain the ball/spring detente (like the Festool OF1010 does) but the typ 2 has a solid casting. So you may or may not see the detence ball/spring when you take the phenolic plate off

2. Later tools seem to use a pin to retain the spring in the thicker column so as Oli says this needs to be drifted out. It isn't there on my type 1 tool but it is there on the typ 2

3. In order to get the circlip off the top of the thin (left hand) post it is necessary to plunge the router, otherwice you can't see it.

I have added this small but vital point to mailee's original instructions in bold so it is obvious.
 

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G'day Oli

Welcome to the router forum.

Thank you for joining us
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi , thanks for the speedy reply. I had found that post but can't seem to get beyond first base with it. When the brown baseplate is removed nothing is revealed, the posts are held into the metal baseplate with pins , one of which I drifted out , the other has one blind side and I've got no idea how to unpin. The springs seem to be held above the pins.
Unless I can remove the baseplate I can't get at the screws around the bottom of the motor housing.
I'll look on YouTube as someone else has suggested and see if I can find some pictorial explanation.
Thanks again
Oli
 

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Hi , thanks for the speedy reply. I had found that post but can't seem to get beyond first base with it. When the brown baseplate is removed nothing is revealed, the posts are held into the metal baseplate with pins , one of which I drifted out , the other has one blind side and I've got no idea how to unpin. The springs seem to be held above the pins.
Unless I can remove the baseplate I can't get at the screws around the bottom of the motor housing.
Hi Oli

The pin you drifted out is on the right-hand (depth scale) side. You can't drift out the pin in the smaller diameter post because as you say it is a blind drilling. As mailee's instructions say you need to remove the ON-OFF switch (on the left hand side) and beneath it in a cavity you should be able to see the brass tube guide and spring in the end of the smaller diameter plunge post. Plunge the router fully and lock the depth and you can clearly see a large diameter circlip around the top of the post. I've just done this afternoon this on my own MOF96-02 typ 2 (MOF96E/3304) and the circlip is there. It needs a slim screwdriver and a pair of needle nose pliers to get it out (and is a very tight fit).

I've updated the original instructions to take this point into account

This hasn't been unfruitful for me, either. When I took the ON-OFF switch off I found that the brass tube in the smaller post was bent like a banana. Sort of explains why the plunge action had been a bit sticky for the last 18 months.:rolleyes: Another part to order.

Good luck and if you hit any more snage please post so we can all learn a bit more

Regards

Phil
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
After the circlip?

Hi , it's taken me a while to get back to the router , but when I did I found the circlip and removed it quite easily , but there's no more positive results. When I slide the base plate away from the router body (de-plunge it) it hits against some other retainer at the standard depth -hits quite solidly too . Any further ideas ? I'm stumped.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
There we go , another 10 ups and downs and everything sprang out at once ! I don't know what it was catching on but it looks like everything should be fine from here on.
Much obliged for your assistance.
 

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I'm glad you got it sorted! Sorry I didn't respond to your previous post but I've been having major broadband issues for the last few weeks which means I'm not getting a brilliant service (or reliability) at the moment. This is now the third time I've tried to post this response, so........

On the subject of the base not detaching straight away the brass bushing at the top of the spring can get bent (as mine did) or can get sort of hammered into the end of the leg so bumping it up and down the way you did would seem to be a very good solution. Hope the rest of your refurb goes well.

Phil
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I persevered with this and the router sprang apart after another few minutes of pushing the plate up and down . (I thought I posted at the time but it doesn't seem to have got through) . So I'm ordering some bearings now. Thanks to the contributers and the forum for being there and helping me out
 

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Thank you so much for this information! I have just been given an Elu MOF96/2 router and it's rather rusty in places! We be dis-assembling it and cleaning it as I go! Your website for the drawing of the router will be very helpful to me!! Thank you again! Gill.
 

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From another forum elsewhere, but by our member mailee (with thanks):



From memory that all seems spot on (it's about 8 or 9 years since I needed to do one), but I'd add that the phenolic baseplate also retains the ball and spring detente for the turret which are easily lost. Please note these instructions are also a good guide for the deWalt DW613/DW614/DW615, Elu 3303/3304 (USA), Elu MOF96/MOF96e(aka MOF96-02), Black & Decker SR100, Trend T5, Perles OF808, AEG OF50 (not the later OFS50 which was a Metabo design), Virutex FR77C/FR78C, etc which are all basically similar having originally come out of either the Scintilla factory in Switzerland (AEG, Elu, some deWalt, B&D) or the Perles factory, although these days I understand they're made in Mexico, Italy or Eastern Europe depending on which on you have. The main difference will be the presence/absence of the speed controller/sensor depending if the model is variable or fixed speed and some variation in the design of the handles (ELU USA models)

Edit: Having posted this I've since had a look at both a MOF96-02 typ 2 and a MOF96 typ 1 and there are detail differences. Oli posted problems below, so I'll add to the above gen:

1. The typ 1 uses the baseplate to retain the ball/spring detente (like the Festool OF1010 does) but the typ 2 has a solid casting. So you may or may not see the detence ball/spring when you take the phenolic plate off

2. Later tools seem to use a pin to retain the spring in the thicker column so as Oli says this needs to be drifted out. It isn't there on my type 1 tool but it is there on the typ 2

3. In order to get the circlip off the top of the thin (left hand) post it is necessary to plunge the router, otherwice you can't see it.

I have added this small but vital point to mailee's original instructions in bold so it is obvious.
Hello there,

I was ver pleased with the manual " how to trip the elu 96". There are however some remarks or additions to make. I have an Elu 96e type 1.
The dismantling of the body is not possible without using a pully-drawer ( I don't know he right word for it. I hope you understand what I mean) .
That is also necesarry for stripping the bottom bearing from the body bottom.
I did not need to remove the plastic bottom plate. There is nothing to dismount under that plate. He pin in the right stand is accesable without removung anything.
I hope thuis Will help some more of you.

Regards
Gerrit.
 

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Welcome to the forum, Gerrit.

Thanks for adding to the post.
 
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