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Marine Engineer
Doug
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A quick, fun project today, something I have wanted to make for a Co-Worker of mine for a while.

On an older vessel we sailed on, we were constantly failing the little, square cooling fans in the main control cabinet. I would leave them on my desk as they failed to remind me to order more. He had a bad habit of picking them up and spinning them when we were having meetings at my desk. It actually became a fun game to leave one out where he could find it, just to see how long it took before he picked it up and played with it.

I ordered some skate bearings (about $0.70 a piece) and looked for some scrap. I found a piece of Brazilian cherry stock and re-sawed it to just over the thickness of the bearing. I cut out 3 of the spinner bodies, only 2 survived well enough to continue. I think I need to re-design the piece and move the aluminum rod bits in about an 1/8 inch.

I chopped up a bunch of aluminum rod, epoxied it into the blanks, and waited for it to cure. I then hit the blanks on the belt sander until flush. Those aluminum dots transmit heat like nobody's business. After everything was flush, I sanded up to 320 by hand and finished with an oil and wax finish. The bearings are just pressed in by hand, so they can be removed to be cleaned and lubricated if needed in the future.

I now have to come up with some more Brazilian Cherry, because I have requests for 7 more...

Before you comment on the 'glittery' background, the wood looks so much richer on it than it did on the dark background I first photographed it on.

The Aspire file is attached, but I think the dots need to be moved closer to the hub bearing.
 

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great idea w/ a better execution..
 
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Rick
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You've got a great imagination Doug. Those turned out really well , and would make for a good conversation piece as people are trying to figure out there purpose lol
 

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Doug, this is neat! I absolutely love working with Brazilian Cherry! It is one of my favorite hardwoods to work with. Simple Mineral Oil puts a nice shine on it!
It's hard enough to use for a wide variety of applications! You did a very nice job with those 60 degree angles!

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
 

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Doug, this is neat! I absolutely love working with Brazilian Cherry! It is one of my favorite hardwoods to work with. Simple Mineral Oil puts a nice shine on it!
It's hard enough to use for a wide variety of applications! You did a very nice job with those 60 degree angles!

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
Otis, I wonder which one of these is the one used for woodworking?

Brazilian cherry is a common name for several plants native to the New World tropics with edible fruits and may refer to:

Eugenia brasiliensis
Eugenia uniflora
Hymenaea courbaril, in the legume family

Herb
 

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Marine Engineer
Doug
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Mark II

The youngest has a birthday today, and she's a Bat Girl fan. Since my oldest stole the other spinner, I thought I would make a Bat Girl shape for her. The material is a Bamboo cutting board from the discount store. It is almost the perfect thickness for this project, it is about 1.2 mm too thick. I left it that thickness, and it works pretty well.

The bamboo is a 2 ply lamination, with the grain going the same direction in each ply. I arranged the piece to hopefully give the most strength, as the cutting is pretty delicate. I was a little nervous pressing the bearings in and hearing it creak, but it held together!

The bamboo cut pretty nicely, and I only needed a few quick passes with 120 grit to get it ready for waxing. I used plain furniture paste wax, and it feels really nice in the hand.

.
 

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