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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know that the idea that finger cuts are not something that is at the top of our list of concerns when operating routers. But maybe we should look at it at least a bit (Pun intended).
I know I've been nicked a few times when installing, adjusting or removing bits. I never gave it much thought until I really got cut. After I got a few stitches I started to think about protection. After I healed I tried TIG welders gloves as they were the thinnest ones and figured I would have the dexterity I wanted. No good.
I finally found HDPE plastic woven finger cotts. These little beggars really work well. I have the touch I wanted and no more Nick's or cuts.
I wear them whenever I'm handling sharp tools. I had a chisel slip and still no cut.
They are very cheap on the internet. Less than 25 cents each.
 

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Great suggestion there, Andy.

We tend to forget that those cutters are, intentionally, very sharp, even when not spinning.
 

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Like these? I have a pair of these in a full glove I use when handling band saw blades and such....work really well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Like these? I have a pair of these in a full glove I use when handling band saw blades and such....work really well.
Exactly, I tried out the ones Rockler had in their store and didn't like the loss of feeling and these are so cheap I gave them a try.
 

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Interesting.... I've never had this problem (at least, not with router bits) but that's a good tidbit to file away.

I use those wrinkly rubber coated gloves often for stuff like concrete work, digging, handling rough lumber and steel roof parts.... They might be a bit too heavy for changing router bits - loss of feeling, as you say - but those are what I would have tried. I used to use the very cheap versions to save my skin while doing large amounts of 80 grit hand sanding before I figured out how to automate that part of production.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Interesting.... I've never had this problem (at least, not with router bits) but that's a good tidbit to file away.

I use those wrinkly rubber coated gloves often for stuff like concrete work, digging, handling rough lumber and steel roof parts.... They might be a bit too heavy for changing router bits - loss of feeling, as you say - but those are what I would have tried. I used to use the very cheap versions to save my skin while doing large amounts of 80 grit hand sanding before I figured out how to automate that part of production.
Automation can be a good friend.
I use regular gloves for other work when I don't need the soft touch but still want protection. I've started to wear gloves when working with Doug Fir as it has a nasty propensity for large slivers.
 

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I keep a pair of light weight gloves in my truck for handling lumber. Annoying to deal with all those slivers while handling the stuff. Worst cut I've gotten was shortly after getting a Lyon style miter trimmer. It is a double sided, horizontal guillotine. I grabbed it the wrong way and got a nasty slice. I then realized that the thing had a handle on top. I then mounted it on a chunk of plywood, and attached two handles to the side (See pix)
399024


I now keep a cardboard on it to keep unknowing hands away. The thing is a wonder at producing exact 45 and 90 degree cuts with glass smooth ends. Picture and face frames are always perfect with this thing. My wife is an artist and bought this for me so I could make frames for her. The long handle goes in back and gives leverage to move the blades.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I keep a pair of light weight gloves in my truck for handling lumber. Annoying to deal with all those slivers while handling the stuff. Worst cut I've gotten was shortly after getting a Lyon style miter trimmer. It is a double sided, horizontal guillotine. I grabbed it the wrong way and got a nasty slice. I then realized that the thing had a handle on top. I then mounted it on a chunk of plywood, and attached two handles to the side (See pix) View attachment 399024

I now keep a cardboard on it to keep unknowing hands away. The thing is a wonder at producing exact 45 and 90 degree cuts with glass smooth ends. Picture and face frames are always perfect with this thing. My wife is an artist and bought this for me so I could make frames for her. The long handle goes in back and gives leverage to move the blades.
How thick of stock can it handle?
 

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Automation can be a good friend.
I use regular gloves for other work when I don't need the soft touch but still want protection. I've started to wear gloves when working with Doug Fir as it has a nasty propensity for large slivers.
Doug Fir can certainly be wicked stuff! I made several windows out of prime grade once, very straight, knot free stuff. Just watch out when sanding a rounded over corner, the annual rings are super hard and sharp where they run out of an edge!

In addition to the splinters, I've seen one of those hard rings deflect a long brad nail. Looked like a hoop earring sticking out of a piece of fir! I saved that piece for a while but eventually discarded it. Long before I had a cell phone and it's camera always handy (not long before anyone had them however, I was slow to accept the change :D )
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Doug Fir can certainly be wicked stuff! I made several windows out of prime grade once, very straight, knot free stuff. Just watch out when sanding a rounded over corner, the annual rings are super hard and sharp where they run out of an edge!

In addition to the splinters, I've seen one of those hard rings deflect a long brad nail. Looked like a hoop earring sticking out of a piece of fir! I saved that piece for a while but eventually discarded it. Long before I had a cell phone and it's camera always handy (not long before anyone had them however, I was slow to accept the change :D )
If it wasn't for it's nasty habits I'd use more of it. I know I have to really put the tension up on my bandsaw or it tends to follow the grain.
I'm building 6 adarondike setties out of select pine and use the DF for the stringers across the back as it has a much higher tensile strength.
I keep a good pair of tweezers in my shop's first aid kit.
 

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How thick of stock can it handle?
You cut about 1/8th long and shave off a 16th on each end. The blade angle is really "low" so it slices, where most blades tear through the fibers. It is almost a necessity for making picture frames. It was invented in the 1880s.
 

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I was in the ER for something last Sunday and a guy came in with a huge slice in his calf. He had removed the blade guard from his circ. saw and it slipped somehow. They wouldn't let him leave after being stitched up because he was weak from shock. Remove safety guards at your own risk. I just won't do that,
 
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