Router Forums banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,820 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Today I realized I am a terrible painter. Or maybe it's just the technique. I painted in an engraved letter on a beer bottle opener, then later decided to sand away the bleed. That didn't work. I ended up planing away the engraving. I will engrave the letter again or just scrap the piece.

And fine detail work is not for me. Too much shaking going on. Trying to finish up some pieces while my sweetie is visiting her uncle in the hospital.

Oh well, You Tube can only do so much for me. At some point I have to pick up the brush. :grin:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,820 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Been there, done that. Unfortunately, I had it happen in the top I was making for a bench. I had been successful before, but this particular piece bled like crazy.

Seal first, then paint
I am making a Route 66 sign. After carving it on the CNC, I masked off the outside border and the shield in the center and spray painted everything that would end up black. That went pretty well. I removed the masking tape and touched up the areas that I didn't cover. Then it came time to paint the white. That went fairly well. I used a foam brush and painted the text and frame. It looked so-so. I had to paint in the 66 numbers and the engraved test for Oklahoma in black. Well, I got a little carried away. After it dried, I tried to sand it some but made a bigger mess. Wife came in and said just leave it, I will touch it up. OK. GAWD, I love her! :grin:
 

·
Registered
Theo
Joined
·
7,195 Posts
The only time I will use a foam brush is when there is a large area to paint, anything even vaguely needing precision I use a small bristle brush. And by small I mean a brush that may have bristles close to toothpick size even, pretty much nothing larger than about 1/4. On the rare occasion haven even used a toothpick, for fine detail. And, if nothing still doesn't come out right, still have the option of painting over and start again, or just tossing it and start from scratch. Sometimes, no matter what you do, it just turns out to be one of those days.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DesertRatTom

·
Registered
Theo
Joined
·
7,195 Posts
In my case, my shaking hand is due to my caffeine addiction. I didn't fire the painter, I just schedule my detail work for for first thing in the morning... BEFORE my first cup of coffee!
I remember years ago reading about the early years of making cars. One company had a pinstriper, whose job was to pinstripe a paint line along the entire side of the cars, by hand. He was an alcoholic, and couldn't even hold a coffee cup without spilling a good part of his coffee. But as soon as his brush touched the car his hand became steady as a rock, and he painted a perfectly straight line the length of the car. Then as soon as his brush left the are, back to uncontrollable shaking.

From the information I have, that is supposedly a true story. From personal knowledge of knowing an alcoholic or two, could well be. I guess the moral of the story is, you need to cut down on coffee, and drink more booze.
>:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,603 Posts
You have had to much beer Mike. :laugh2:

I am not sure if this will work but here goes. I have done this while routing a sign. To start I lay down a sheet of Duck brand clear stick on shelf. I make sure it's straight and then I run a roller over it to make sure it sticks good and there is no air pockets. I then carve the sign and when through I make sure the shelf paper is still stuck down around where the router bit has been. I then spray paint and let it dry then peel off the shelf paper.

Hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,205 Posts
Foam brushes cannot be controlled adequately. Impossible. You need an artist's quality brush for fine work. Quarter inch is a little large. You didn't mention what kind of paint, but bleeding gets worse the thinner the paint. Sealing first can help a lot with bleeding. If filling in a large, recessed area, you're probably going to go off the line here and there. Sand the top lightly to remove the little irregularities before you put on the next layer.

This may not be the solution, but you can order a long bristle lettering brush which gives you a really nice edge

Another option to consider is something called Friskit, which is something like rubber cement. Paint it over areas you want to protect, paint up to the line and if you go over, when you use an eraser to remove the friskit, the oopsies come off as well.

Pix of brushes: Try the smaller ones for best control on lettering. Shorter bristles probably better for filling in recessed background. Forget foam brushes. Long bristles hold more paint so you don't have to load it as often so your line will be continuous. Sometimes these are called pinstriping brushes.

My wife is an artist, so If I had something tricky to paint, she'd be my painter in chief. You're lucky to have such a great wife. I feel the same way about my Jean.

Here's a video on brushes, which is actually a fairly complex topic. Use the wrong brush, and you get a mess.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Theo
Joined
·
7,195 Posts
Interesting video. Can't say it was a lot of help as such to me, because I don't paint pictures. I paint my wooden figure banks (may go back to making them), but since I lay out the pattern with a fine tip magic marker, it's like painting by numbers, without the numbers. I do paint the occasional cane handle, very occasionally, but normally only for my own personal canes, because I find painting them a real PITA. So any I paint for someone else will definitely boost the price up. I did learn a bit from the video - I looked at my brushes, and actually have some that are pretty darn decent. Even got two small foam brushes that I have not a clue what I'll use them for, but won't toss them. Got the foam brushes when I picked up a pack of I think it was 24 brushes, from WallyWorld, for around $2. Some of the brushes are quite decent, some I think are brushes for kids doing water paints, with the majority somewhere in the middle. I consider them well worth the price, because for the type of painting I do, they work out just fine.

Now, all my painting is with acrylic latex. Relatively inexpensive, water cleanup, no bad smell. I get the small cans. Very easy to mix custom colors, and thin it down enough and it works about like a dye, except you can make it any color you want.

I keep my brushes in a pencil case. Works well, but with my last brushes buy, it is pretty much packed. So found pencil cases with a hinged top that will work perfectly, should hold all my present brushes nicely, and will get some extras, so if I run across another good deal on brushes I will be have somewhere to store them. Also use those cases for my mechanical pencils, my pens, and my colored pens. For my colored markers have a deeper case that hold them all nicely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,459 Posts
Not joking here, Mike; take a painting class. I mean from an artist. Personally I like watercolour, but acrylic might be more to your liking.
There are brush stroke exercises that help develop the hand-eye coordination thing, and build confidence that the paint will do what you want.
 

·
Registered
Theo
Joined
·
7,195 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Way back in the dark ages, for my eighth birthday, my dad made me a sign that said "Happy Birthday Ashley", followed by the date. It was a thin piece of wood, perhaps 3/8", or maybe even 1/4". I think he routed the letters freehand, and it may even have been his router's first test drive. Anyway, back to painting...

He painted the letters black. I'm not sure if he spray painted or brushed, but all the recesses sucked light like a black hole. Then he sanded the face of it to remove paint from everywhere other than grooves. Then he stained the face, I think applying the stain with a very short knap paint roller.

I didn't see any of this, but I asked, because I was fascinated by the detail and the perfect separation of the black in the letters from the stain on the face. To my memory, his explanation of that procedure was my first appreciation of how a good sequence can create a nearly foolproof procedure. Since then, I spend way too much time enjoying the art of perfecting a build sequence, and perhaps too little time developing surgical skills. So I empathize Mike on firing the painter. It's one of those things I just don't do if I can help it.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top