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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Neighbor chopped down a cedar tree about 3 years ago and offered me a big log from it to me. Its been drying since. I finally decided to process it. Ordered a small Alaskan chainsaw mill and I've started making lumber.

Lumber still has between 11-15 percent moisture content so still have to air dry a little bit longer but shouldn't be too long. First sections I was only able to get short pieces so cut at 8/4. This last slab I cut at 6/8 and probably the remainder of the log. It is about 7 feet long and about 12 inch wide. I should be able to get at least 4 more slabs out of it. But that will be another day.

It is super muggy is East Texas and I think I sweated a gallon. I need to re-hydrate with an adult beverage. No power tools after that.
 

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beautiful wood and well done..

but I gotta ask...
1st attempt.. eh...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Herb,

It really smells strongly of cedar in my garage right now. It is nice though. Better than my man sweat funk.

Phil,

I had not heard of Madrona lumber. Looked it up. Man I am jealous. That is going to be amazing lumber.

Stick,

First real attempt at using the mill. I played with it on a short little log to get a feel for it but this is my first real use of it on a real log. First few cuts looked like I took a hatchet to the log. There is a learning curve that I am still climbing. Still have a long ways to really know how to use it effectively. Probably should have used different words for the title. :)
 

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I bought one last year to cut up a few trees on my place, some lodgepole pine and D. fir. They will work your butt off but I got some nice boards too. Not nearly as colorful as yours. If I was going to do lots more I think I might set up some rails and bolt some pads on my bar to slide along and roll the logs into the middle. I think it might be easier to jack the log up and down that set up for the Alaska mills for each cut. Kind of like a Logosol. Like this but with a rail on either side. https://www.logosol.com/store/sawmills/chain-sawmills/ A buddy had one and his was about $2500 whereas mine was $100.
 

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Wonderful looking wood you are getting from it. Too bad the Alaska Sawmill doesn't come to the Lower 48 complete with Alaska weather!
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Just one more step you can now do yourself. Good looking wood. Any idea what you'll build with it?
No idea for the majority of the lumber but for a small portion I do plan to make some Native American flutes. I love the way they sound.

I thought it would be fun to learn how to make them. I've never made them and have zero musical background so we'll see what kind of Frankenstein's I can make.
 

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Nice lumber ! the short pieces on the first picture look planed.

As far as sweating, just think how they did it 100 + years ago by hand with saws, that was HARD work !

Also before investing in equipment, there are small sawmills in so many areas and you might be surprised how little they charge to saw a log or just a few logs. There are also portable sawmills that can come to you, again not very expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Dan, I fully processed the smaller chunks. I ran them through a jointer and planer. So as long as they don't twist they should be ready to use. There is a little bit of checking so I will lose about an inch or two on some of the pieces.
 

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I wanted to saw some large firewood into boards a few years ago. It was slow cutting so I took my chain to the Saw shop to get it professionally sharpened, I have always done this myself on the fly between falling and bucking.
The fellow at the shop asked me what I was going to use it for, and i told him to slice some blocks into boards.
He told me I had a crosscut chain and needed a ripping chain. He made one up for me and sharpened it. When I used it ,what a difference, just slicing like butter and didn't bog the saw down one bit.

The chain had flat raker and more space between teeth. The cutting teeth were a different grind too.
Just came to mind when I read this Post, in case someone might be interested.
Herb
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Dan, it is a lot of work so I think this will be a rare occasion for me as well. The remainder of the log has some damage near the center which will limit how much good lumber I can get from it. The figure is very nice but also very pronounced. It will limit on what I can build with it unless I want the figure to take

Herb, I am using a cross cut chain so really not the best way to do it. I wanted to see how it went before buying a ripping chain. Still on the fence.

I have a small saw mill near me (5 miles away) that specializes in cedar. There is another great small sawmill that has several species of lumber but they are an hour+ away from me.

But I am starting to design a picture frame for some artwork my wife just finished for me. I think I'll incorporate some of this cedar into it.
 
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