Router Forums banner

Flush Trim Cutter with Down Shear - Bottom Bearing

3046 Views 14 Replies 6 Participants Last post by  AndyL
Hi

Is a Flush Trim Cutter with Down Shear and Bottom Bearing suitable for profile routing on a router table?

Regards

John
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
yup...
I'd use a straight solid carbide, not twisted. It might pull the sample off your template.
A straight has no shear vectors.
  • Like
Reactions: 1
I'd use a straight solid carbide, not twisted. It might pull the sample off your template.
A straight has no shear vectors.
I had never thought of straight vs twisted. Do you know where can I find more information on the comparisons?

J
A straight, two flute carbide bit has two cutting edges running parallel (or really close to parallel) to tlhe body of the bit.

Spiral bits are machined like a drill bit, with the flutes wrapped around the bit. They can be upspiral or downspiral, depending if they pull stock up to the collet or push it away from the collet

http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-tips/techniques/routing/spiral-bit
John if the bit is listed as a down-cut bit it will try to lift the part off the table because it is designed to push chips away from the collet. If you do use a down-cut bit it would be best to use feather boards to hold the part down for safety.
I am a bit confused now, what is best and of the safest for use on a router table for profiling?

Regards

John
John if the bit is listed as a down-cut bit it will try to lift the part off the table because it is designed to push chips away from the collet. If you do use a down-cut bit it would be best to use feather boards to hold the part down for safety.
This is the bit

Axcaliber Flush Trim Cutter with Down Shear - Bottom Bearing - Trimming - Router Cutters - Routing - Power Tool Accessories - Accessories | Axminster Tools & Machinery

Is it a spiral bit?

John
John that is a down shear bit but it is not a spiral bit. It will try to push the part up from the table, remember the router is upside down in the table. The more material you try to take at one time the more pressure will be generated. If you make lite passes and use good push blocks you should be okay, just don't try to over feed the bit or it might cause enough rise you might have problems.
Rule out confusion. Use straight bits. They're much safer & cheaper.
No unexpected calamities. Can you tell if a cutter is up-spiral or down?
John that is a down shear bit but it is not a spiral bit. It will try to push the part up from the table, remember the router is upside down in the table. The more material you try to take at one time the more pressure will be generated. If you make lite passes and use good push blocks you should be okay, just don't try to over feed the bit or it might cause enough rise you might have problems.
I can trade it in with the store for a straight bit, do you thunk that would that be a safer option?

John
Straight bits are really the best bet for use in a router table, you don't have to worry about which way a shear or spiral bit will try to move the part and if you have the face of the part up or down. Also being new to router use it gives you less to worry about during you learning curve.
Have you looked at Wealden Tool's router cutters John? While the Axminster cutters are generally very good, that one is rather pricey. The Wealden ones are excellent quality and a bit cheaper in this case.
https://www.wealdentool.com/acatalog/Trimmers_7.html
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top