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I have followed a few of his videos, and it can show that bad things can happen to experienced wood workers at any time.

But, as some would say, better to be safe than sorry.
 
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Learn something every day. Power woodcarving....wow - the very idea of that smells of danger that even ruffles my feathers.

I own 5 electric angle grinders and 10 small air grinders. Have used them for hundreds of hours grinding what they were meant for - metal or stone. Changing the premise of the tool with a chainsaw style blade into a soft material like wood brings with it many dangers that don't exist with metal grinding.

If you misplace the grinding wheel location quadrant while grinding metal, you will scuff another spot on the surface and the sparks/material will fly into a different direction, but nothing severe will happen otherwise. I also prefer using the edge of the wheel for small, accurate material removal. Danger with that is the wheel shattering or cracking, but that is very uncommon with some semblance of control and feel for what you're doing.

It is customary in the automotive world to place yourself away from the danger zone of any tool - both the outfeed of the grinder (having hot metal grinding dust fired into your exposed skin can cause blood poisoning....ask me how I know this lol), as well as staying clear of the area when/if the tool should break, wander or turn around.

Without question, our friend in the video was standing in the wrong location, he should have turned the workpiece around and stood behind, not in front of the tool. Basic mistake IMHO, and I see no redeeming explanation for actually doing this in any way shape or form. I bet the manufacturer of the blade and tool would have something to say about using either on anything but a convex or flat surface. Total fail waiting to happen.

Secondly, the very idea of using anything but the edge or top 1/4" of a cutting blade like that is suicide waiting to happen. If you insist on woodcarving, use a real chainsaw - the tip does a great job of carving out wood in a similar manner without the danger, the 2 stroke oil scent may drive the wife crazy, unless you use Klotz, which smells like laundry detergent, lol.
 

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Without question, our friend in the video was standing in the wrong location, he should have turned the workpiece around and stood behind, not in front of the tool. Basic mistake IMHO, and I see no redeeming explanation for actually doing this in any way shape or form.
That's about the way I figure it too. My thoughts in the other thread were that he was using the tool wrong, and wasn't afraid of it. You use a whole lot more caution if you are a bit afraid of the tool you are using. Get overconfident, and you are open to being hurt.
 
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the 2 stroke oil scent may drive the wife crazy, unless you use Klotz, which smells like laundry detergent, lol.
I love the smell of a chainsaw running. Dunno if it's the oil I smell or what, but I love the smell. Just like snowmobiles. Love the smell of 'em running. Yup, I'm not normal...
 
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Learn something every day. Power woodcarving....wow - the very idea of that smells of danger that even ruffles my feathers.


Secondly, the very idea of using anything but the edge or top 1/4" of a cutting blade like that is suicide waiting to happen. If you insist on woodcarving, use a real chainsaw - the tip does a great job of carving out wood in a similar manner without the danger, the 2 stroke oil scent may drive the wife crazy, unless you use Klotz, which smells like laundry detergent, lol.
I've heard from numerous people over time that you should never attempt to use the tip of a chain saw for fear of kickback. I've seen it done at woodshows but they seem to be in a class of their own. I have a dipstick neighbour that bought a gas powered one and uses it for the smallest of twigs I've ever seen. A simple pair of garden pruners would do. He can't stop revving it to get attention. I think he sits behind a desk all day at his job and wants to be Pierre the Woodsman on the weekends. Heeeres Johnny!!
 

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Something will bite us at one time or another. Got my first kickback on the tablesaw last year, first in 40 years. I'll be 111 when the next one comes around. I worked two summers for a major manufacturer in Brooklyn, NY. Heard of accidents on hydraulic presses, etc.
Worked with a maintenance fellow here that literally had his face peeled off when a press cycled.
 

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Not long after getting my first table saw, I decided to practice on a piece of warped ply. It kicked back, hit me in the solar plexis and left a sore and bruised spot that took months to get over. Now I stand to the side, use Grrippers, and carefully plan every single cut. Sharp whirly things command my complete attention.
 

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Not long after getting my first table saw, I decided to practice on a piece of warped ply. It kicked back, hit me in the solar plexis and left a sore and bruised spot that took months to get over. Now I stand to the side, use Grrippers, and carefully plan every single cut. Sharp whirly things command my complete attention.
Huh. I've cut warped plywood before, with no problems. However, I cut it very slowly, and use push sticks, and push blocks, and keep it tight against the fence.

Check the woodworking videos with so-called pro woodworkers cutting on the table saw. I figure at least 75% of them stand in line with the saw blade. I would say they have no fear of the saw, so are overconfident, and are gonna get hurt one day. Stand out of line with the blade is about the first thing I was taught in shop class about using the power saw, that was in 1953/54, and I have never stood in line with the saw blade.
 
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Huh. I've cut warped plywood before, with no problems. However, I cut it very slowly, and use push sticks, and push blocks, and keep it tight against the fence.

Check the woodworking videos with so-called pro woodworkers cutting on the table saw. I figure at least 75% of them stand in line with the saw blade. I would say they have no fear of the saw, so are overconfident, and are gonna get hurt one day. Stand out of line with the blade is about the first thing I was taught in shop class about using the power saw, that was in 1953/54, and I have never stood in line with the saw blade.
I never had a shop class and was brand new to a new table saw. Didn't know much then about them. Today, I'm never in line with the blade, use Grrippers and push sticks, never trap the work, always use a splitter of some sort. Take time to plan each cut, sometimes even rehearse them.
@Biagio This is a good string for newbies in particular.
 

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I never had a shop class and was brand new to a new table saw.
We had shop classes starting in the 4th grade. But wasn't exposed to table saws, and other power tools, until the 10th grade. My present saw had the guard and splitter removed when it was new, never have used either, ever, in fact. Nowadays I understand few schools have shop classes. Instead have computer classes.

Check the youtube woodworking videos. You may think I'm nuts for trashing my saw guard and splitter, cutting warped wood, etc. But some of those so-called pros, a lot in fact, cut wood with no push stick or push block. No biggie, with a large piece. But these guy cut small pieces with just their hands that I would be too scared to cut without push sticks and blocks. They are just too comfortable with their saws, and an accident waiting to happen. I value my fingers way too much for things they have no concern about, and are "teaching" woodworking practices. My shop teacher would have failed all of them.
 
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