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I found a book at the library on Arts and Craft projects. I really liked David Thiel's version of the Wright lamp that was designed by Wright for his Fallingwater house in Pennsylvania. I decided to follow his plan with a few minor modifications. The original lamp had a granite base. David changed it to gloss black painted pine and I moved it on to clear maple with shellac finish. Stayed with the walnut shade. I also changed the lamp post and shade to make the lamp taller and narrower.

A fun project and pretty quick to do. I was able to resaw my walnut scrap down to the 3/16" thickness on my bandsaw then clean it up with a hand plane. The 45 degree lamp shade mitre turned out perfect right off of the table saw. His trick of taping the outside of the lamp shade joint with painter tape really pulled it together during the glue up. Held the base components together during the glue up using the lamp hardware. If you want to take on this project, David Thiel's instructions are excellent. I learned a lot. Finished with two coats of blonde shellac followed by steel wool and wax.
 

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very nice....
well done...
 

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Nicely done.
 

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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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Excellent job and a nice looking lamp.
 

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Never heard of the Fallingwater House. That's an impressive building.

Loving the look of the lamps too, we couldn't make something like that, we're too useless to touch electrics, so our government thinks.
 

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Ross
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Very nicely done.
 

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Never heard of the Fallingwater House. That's an impressive building.

Loving the look of the lamps too, we couldn't make something like that, we're too useless to touch electrics, so our government thinks.

Falling Water is about a 45 minute drive away for us here as well as 2 or 3 other Frank Lloyd Wright homes. FW is a stunningly beautiful exhibit of design and craftsmanship. Anyone traveling around the SW Pa. area would be well served by making a planned visit to the area. Spend the day visiting Falling Water, Kentuck Knob and Duncan House, all FLW designs.

https://www.fallingwater.org/

Laurel Highlands, PA Frank Lloyd Wright | Fallingwater Tours

Several years ago, a preservation project for Falling Water was undertaken and documented. These two youtube video's provide an excellent insight into what went into the construction of Falling Water.


 

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That was a very good lecture by R Silman. I mentioned the lamps to my SO and told him of the Falling Water House. He was amazed I had seen it's website as his dad was an architect back in the 60's to 80's and he spent time lecturing in the US. While he was there he visited numerous Frank L Wrights builds. He phoned his dad today as it was his birthday, and mentioned this and it turns out his dad gave about 8500 photographic slides of the various buildings to one of the Scottish universities.
 

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I got to thinking about this project and realized that for me at least, that low a light level just doesn't work for me anymore. But what if you put a multi step switch on it and mounted under counter LED strips on it? Those things produce a LOT of light for almost no wattage and no heat. You could even install a 3 way switch connected to 1, then 2 strips, which could get very bright if you wanted it that way. You could even add a fourth strip with a very warm filter over it. Roscoe makes theatrical gels (filters). I have a filter in the overhead light in my office that warms up the light slightly, the color is called Bastard Amber and it was commonly used in theatrical lighting for decades.

A horizontal version of this hanging from the ceiling, or in a recess of some sort, would also be very cool. Those remotes they sell at Christmas would work really well to control such lights. Soft, indirect light, low wattage, no heat. Replace the wood long pieces with frosted glass and you get a lot of light.
 

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I really like those, Jamie. Great job! I'd love to see the last pic with the light on, with the other room lights off.
 
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