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I'm wondering if the powered respirator mask that Tom discussed and a pair of over the glasses ski goggles might be effective. They usually have a closed cell foam that seals pretty good around the face and some ventilation which keeps them from fogging. If you have goggles that are pretty effective but for the fogging, there are some suggestions for controlling fogging on a website found at https://dualsportalchemy.com/tip-keeping-your-goggles-fog-free. If you get a pair of over the goggle classes, they would allow you to use anything from your cheaters to regular glasses. I hope this can help give you some relief.
 

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Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
I'm wondering if the powered respirator mask that Tom discussed and a pair of over the glasses ski goggles might be effective. They usually have a closed cell foam that seals pretty good around the face and some ventilation which keeps them from fogging. If you have goggles that are pretty effective but for the fogging, there are some suggestions for controlling fogging on a website found at https://dualsportalchemy.com/tip-keeping-your-goggles-fog-free. If you get a pair of over the goggle classes, they would allow you to use anything from your cheaters to regular glasses. I hope this can help give you some relief.
I’ve never been able to wear googles, as no matter how good they are they always fog up .
I have an unusual body chemistry. In a vehicle I can ice up a window beside me ,where as the other person doesn’t even have fog on his side . I usually spend a lot of time scraping my window so we have visibility.
It’s a strange phenomenon lol
 

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@RainMan 2.0

besides the shop use of box fan/filter check this out. i mean a guy in a lab coat? it has to be true.
we have horrible allergy periods here in oklahoma. i might get a couple of these for the house to use in allergy season


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kH5APw_SLUU
i dont know why i didnt see it before but this guy puts the filter in front of the fan, i guess for testing. every other time i have seen this setup its with the filter is strapped to the back of the fan. i didnt want anyone to see lab coat guy and think thats how its used.
also i may get some lower merv filters. theres seems to be a big difference in airflow with the merv 13. im gonna get a cheapo filter and one rated more in the middle and see where the sweet spot is. if its not moving a bunch of air its not going to work well
 

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If you put the filter in front, you're allowing particulates to cake up on the fan blades and in the motor housing, as the contaminated air is drawn through.
The filter in front method would be fine if only clean air was being drawn through. Pushing filtered fresh air into a spray booth for instance.
 

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i called filterbuy.com and they said a merv 13 is more for hospitals and commercial systems and will restrict the air flow the way im using it. they suggested that a merv 11 wont effect it at all and still do a great job on a dusty shop. so that would be the better choice on a box fan set up. i got these from amazon cheaper than the ones from filterbuy

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01CR9K2HW/ref=ppx_od_dt_b_asin_title_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

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Discussion Starter #30
i called filterbuy.com and they said a merv 13 is more for hospitals and commercial systems and will restrict the air flow the way im using it. they suggested that a merv 11 wont effect it at all and still do a great job on a dusty shop. so that would be the better choice on a box fan set up.
I wonder what merv is comparable to a hepa filter ?
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Merv 17 is comparable to HEPA
Could hardly imagine the restriction. But it would sure be a bonus Kung health wise .

Priced out the 3M 300 at our Air Liquide dealer , and they were around $2500 . I believe it was 2150 at Amazon.ca ,so obviously I’d order from there.
Although I’d like it very much , it’s a lot of money to spend right now . Maybe if I get a job with the contractors after I’m unemployed mid August.

I really want a cncrouterparts pro 4x4 also , well in the worse way actually, but I’m really not thinking I’d ever recover the 20K investment. I really need a cool toy to play with though
 

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RainMan 2.0

Looking at your experience and the recommendations of our router forum buddies, I’d say you are or will be sitting pretty good with regard to wearable apparatus others recommend. What concerns me is what happens when you are still in your shop and not wearing your apparatus– especially since you are experiencing allergies. If you do a little digging, you can find others that are in your shoes and have some excellent experience and recommendations for the shop itself.

In a nutshell, wood dust comes in two unhealthy forms:
• the stuff you can see, and
• the stuff you can’t (which is actually worse).
IF your shop is relatively small and lucky enough, you might be able to beat both forms of dust with a HEPA shop vac, and cross-ventilation via an fan in an open window, a fan, and an opposite open door. If that’s not enough, you’ll need to find more mechanical approach to get both “stuffs” out of your shop.

Should you opt for a system involving filtration, each form of wood dust should be considered separately.
If you only use a coarse filter system, it will remove the stuff that you see floating in the air, but the smallest particles pass right through it. Worse yet, these original particles are joined by the next batch as you work, so the air quality deteriorates and you can’t even see it.
If you only use a filter system fine enough to capture the “no-see-ums”, they tend to clog, causing MUCH MAINTENANCE or system failure. At least you can see the failure, but cleaning up a whole shop can really cut into your work time and long-term health.

Personally, I really like twmv86’s ideas of using multiple box fans, but I might try varying the MERV ratings between 13 and 17 to capture a larger span of particle sizes. Further, I have a friend with an updraft furnace fan like twmv86 also described. His uses a hospital-grade HEPA filter and it all rests on a heavy metal cart. His works great because he also uses a dust cyclone AND filter setup. I’m so impressed that I’m working on one for my shop now! Bill Pentz has a cool design that uses a tall filter resting vertically on the floor with a vortex fan atop to pull and direct filtered air around the shop. Way Cool.

Lastly, PROPERLY SIZED dual filtration systems can work together, but you’ll likely need a particle counter to assure it’s working initially and then as a check periodically. These units can feel a bit pricey, but some woodworking and CNC groups buy a unit together that can be shared with its members.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Great points Ron. Thank you for the all the ideas guys
 
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