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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Since Harry is posting past projects, I think you might enjoy seeing the small parts miter jig for Japanese saws.

I was inspired to make this from an Woodsmith TV project that was also in the magazine. It is made from a 24 inch square piece of 18mm BB ply and required some very exacting cuts and assembly.

The circular piece rotates nearly 60 degrees in either direction. The miniature fence is made from a piece of scrap. The circular piece was cut on a band saw using a circle cutting jig, and the piece it's cut from is used to surround it. Drilled a quarter inch hole for the jig, which is what the circular piece turns on. It is held in place by the mini fence.

The blocks are basically triangles held in place with brass bolts. This allows the guide blocks to be fitted to a particular saw.

I use this fairly often to cut trim pieces for decoration on picture frames. The red knobs (cheerful, aren't they), are useful. The one on the right drops into holes drilled at exactly 45 and 90 degrees (you can see the holes for stops on the circle piece). Used a draftsman's triangle to set the angles precisely, with the saw blade in place. The other red knob will lock the circular piece at any angle. The right hand knob is just a pin, the left hand uses a 1/4inch bolt with a brass threaded insert. Used glossy RED nail polish to paint the spherical knobs, which knobs I found at HD. All the threaded hardware is brass, the 1/4 pins are aluminum rod.

The base is 3 layers thick, and is very stable. Took about 5 hours to cut and assemble it. Much of that time was making certain that every cut followed the pattern that was published in that issue of the magazine. The guide blocks were cut from one solid piece of birch.

Fun to use this thing, and of course a Japanese Dozuki saw is a treat to use and makes incredibly clean cuts. Not sure what issue the pattern was in, but I see it in use occasionally on their TV show, you can order the plan for $8 on sale. https://www.woodsmithplans.com/plan/precision-cutting-small-parts-jig/
 

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Looks good and very useful Tom. Did you have to look far for the nail polish mate. Do you have the same shade of lipstick to go with it?:wink:
I used to have a large selection of nail polishes when I was building model cars. People were always intrigued when they would see me rummaging through the nail polishes on special.:unsure:
Cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
@Old_Tom I keep many colors so I can color code my computer mice and matching USB bluetooth thingie. Once they're mixed up, I can never match them up otherwise. I have a lot of computers around here from my consulting biz. That red is what I think of when I visualize a Farrari--intense.

As to lipstick, well, it's an old trick dry wallers use. Put lipstick around an electrical box edge, press the drywall against it and you know exactly where to cut. Clever, what? BTW, several of my tool stands with doors have bright red knobs too. Cheerful, make me smile. The other great use for lipstick is kissing. The target is well defined.
 

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Since Harry is posting past projects, I think you might enjoy seeing the small parts miter jig for Japanese saws.

I was inspired to make this from an Woodsmith TV project that was also in the magazine. It is made from a 24 inch square piece of 18mm BB ply and required some very exacting cuts and assembly.

The circular piece rotates nearly 60 degrees in either direction. The miniature fence is made from a piece of scrap. The circular piece was cut on a band saw using a circle cutting jig, and the piece it's cut from is used to surround it. Drilled a quarter inch hole for the jig, which is what the circular piece turns on. It is held in place by the mini fence.

The blocks are basically triangles held in place with brass bolts. This allows the guide blocks to be fitted to a particular saw.

I use this fairly often to cut trim pieces for decoration on picture frames. The red knobs (cheerful, aren't they), are useful. The one on the right drops into holes drilled at exactly 45 and 90 degrees (you can see the holes for stops on the circle piece). Used a draftsman's triangle to set the angles precisely, with the saw blade in place. The other red knob will lock the circular piece at any angle. The right hand knob is just a pin, the left hand uses a 1/4inch bolt with a brass threaded insert. Used glossy RED nail polish to paint the spherical knobs, which knobs I found at HD. All the threaded hardware is brass, the 1/4 pins are aluminum rod.

The base is 3 layers thick, and is very stable. Took about 5 hours to cut and assemble it. Much of that time was making certain that every cut followed the pattern that was published in that issue of the magazine. The guide blocks were cut from one solid piece of birch.

Fun to use this thing, and of course a Japanese Dozuki saw is a treat to use and makes incredibly clean cuts. Not sure what issue the pattern was in, but I see it in use occasionally on their TV show, you can order the plan for $8 on sale. https://www.woodsmithplans.com/plan/precision-cutting-small-parts-jig/
Nicely made and looks to be more accurate than many commercial ones.
 

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Nail polish makes a good locking compound for machine screws too.
 

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