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Hello I am new at this I'm doing stacked text using 60 degree V bit and my raised letters are not smooth wood I'm using Pine wood Bit is set at 18,000 rpm 40 IPM. AM i using to sokt of a wood or is it something in my tool setup or whatever . This is my first project so I m as green as it gets but i did suceed at righting the program it looks good if the letters were smooth.
 

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Hi Brian and welcome. One of the reasons cuts turn out fuzzy is that the wood is too green still.
 
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David - Machinist in wood
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Welcome to the forum, Brian!

We do like photos so show us your shop, tools, projects, CNC, etc. whenever you're ready.

Yes, I agree with Charles - wood may be too wet. Try the same cut with some good hardwood like Maple and see if you get the same results. Also, what bit are you using (specifically)? Is it sharp? Is it carbide or HSS? I use a 60° bit and engrave at 100 ipm with no fuzzy edges (could go faster, really).

Got any photos of your work, even this with fuzzy edges?

David
 

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You're using construction lumber if you got it at Lowes and it should be dry enough but that isn't always the case. You're in Memphis which doesn't help. The pine may be southern yellow pine and it tends to be more pitchy than other species of pine. Our lodgepole pine would probably work just fine for what you are doing but it needs to dry some too. David would have a better idea of what works as he lives in NW Louisiana which would be similarly humid to Memphis.
 

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For me anyway, pine from the big box stores always is a crap shoot if its going to carve well. For a low cost option, I use poplar which seems to cut a little better but every long once in a while I will get a fuzzy carving.

I do a lot of test carvings to see how my patterns will carve before selling them. I hate to say this but these test cuts are normally relegated to the burn pile since I have no need for the carvings themselves. For this reason, poplar is my go to for a cheap lumber.

Unfortunately, pricey wood seems to carve better. My favorites is cherry, walnut, purple heart, padauk, mahogany and maple.

Try to carve across the grain instead of with the grain as well.
 

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David - Machinist in wood
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This is about the only thing I've done in Pine in the last five years or so and they came out just fine. 100 ipm, 3/8" 90° bit, 18k rpm.

Font Text Calligraphy Label Games


David
 

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Mike
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Brian welcome to the Router Forums.

One thing to remember is 99.99% of the items you cut on the CNC will require cleanup to some degree.

I agree with everyone about the softness of pine being a problem. It will also depend on what kind of pine it is because I used some South American pine to make a jewelry box one time that was really hard. I use select pine from Home Depot and Lowes for some of the items I make but I know I will have additional cleanup after machining. It cuts better than construction grade pine with fewer fuzzies but is more expensive. I also use poplar and it cuts cleaner but still has some cleanup but not as much. I also use what is called White (fur)wood for the color and it is even worse than construction grade pine about fuzzies but I want the white color so I'm willing to do the extra cleanup needed.

I would rather carve Cherry, Maple, Walnut, Oak, Lacewood, Rosewood, Movingue, Yellowheart, Purpleheart, and the list goes on. The best carvings I have done, with the least amount of cleanup, have been hard exotics with high oil content. All of the items I carved using Cocobolo have come off the CNC almost polished but the price is too high to justify using it except on very special projects.

As far as speeding up the feed rate it will depend on the capabilities of your machine. if it has a lot of flex then you need to make sure you stay within its limits. If it is a good tight machine then you probably won't have any problem using a higher feed rate. Feed rates depend on a lot of factors, machine tightness, spindle RPM, bit design, bit deflection, bit chip load, how much of the cutting edge you are actually using, and material being machined.

The best way to find out what feed rate to use for each bit on your machine would be to use a feed rate calculator to get you close, then set up a test board to see how your bit carves at different rates based on the calculations.
 

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Brian: As others have said, if you can tell us more about the lumber, we can likely give you better advice. For example, at my local Lowes, I can buy pine 2x framing lumber, I can buy good 4 sides pine shelving and I can buy clear pine boards. The "pine" 2x framing lumber is, as often as not, spruce. The moisture content is generally quite high and it's pitchy. The shelving and clear pine boards, though, as usually quite dry. They route quite differently.
 

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Brian: As others have said, if you can tell us more about the lumber, we can likely give you better advice. For example, at my local Lowes, I can buy pine 2x framing lumber, I can buy good 4 sides pine shelving and I can buy clear pine boards. The "pine" 2x framing lumber is, as often as not, spruce. The moisture content is generally quite high and it's pitchy. The shelving and clear pine boards, though, as usually quite dry. They route quite differently.
I would think that some of the pine in your area Grant should be eastern red pine which happens to be plentiful in your area. It's a little denser than D fir and is supposed to make good lumber. If Lowe's is buying locally then that could be what you get. Our spruces out here are the least pitchy of any wood and also one of the least dense.
 
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