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I live in Phoenix, AZ. Summers get real hot (100+). Would welcome any ideas on how to cool down my garage/workshop so that I can get some work done in the summer months. Central airconditioning is not an option.
 

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I live in Phoenix, AZ. Summers get real hot (100+). Would welcome any ideas on how to cool down my garage/workshop so that I can get some work done in the summer months. Central airconditioning is not an option.
45 average morning humidity and 18 percent average afternoon percent May - September says swamp cooler. I'll venture to say they are probably real common in the Phoenix, AZ climate.
 

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I live in Phoenix, AZ. Summers get real hot (100+). Would welcome any ideas on how to cool down my garage/workshop so that I can get some work done in the summer months. Central airconditioning is not an option.
Well, if you want AC & heat + a major investment, a mini-split is what we selected for a porch remodel - the Mitsubishi Mr. Slim shown below; the smaller unit is on the brick wall of the porch as shown; the conduit goes below the floor to the main unit under the porch floor - with a studded wall the conduit contents could be hidden. The porch is about the same size as your shop but w/ a standard height ceiling.

 

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Yes, the correct name is Evaporative Cooler and one problem with the Portable Evaporative Cooler is they are often used in a space with the windows closed and as they operate the humidity percent increases and the unit becomes , well , not so Evaporative with the air becoming more saturated and uncomfortable in many instances.

If one or two of the portables were to be installed in window openings for outdoor air intake then they may very well work in the Phoenix climate.
 

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I live in Texas and yesterday was 108*. I just bought a 110V, 13k BTU portable AC/heater/dehumidifier combo unit for around $500 for my 400 sq. ft. shop/garage. I looked at the split minis but I could have, literally, built a new shop for what those things cost (around $4K installed). I have only had it for about a week, but it seems to make a huge difference. The key is insulation. I also added extra insulation to the attic over the garage as well as putting weather stripping around the garage doors. All of this will pretty much seal off your shop, so you will need some kind of air filtration to keep the dangerous sawdust down as well as circulating the air. As I said it was 108* yesterday and the shop was a "comfortable?" 85 to 90*.
Edited: I should have said that the shop was 85 to 90 without the AC unit being turned on due to the insulation and weather stripping. That is a significant amount compared to outside temp.
 

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I live in Phoenix, AZ. Summers get real hot (100+). Would welcome any ideas on how to cool down my garage/workshop so that I can get some work done in the summer months. Central airconditioning is not an option.
I live in Northwest Phoenix and I understand your pain. Evaporative coolers would not work too well in the summer months as our humidity is up. I had the same problem as you and got a Koolfront air conditioner, which is on wheels and vents through a four inch hose which you put out your window. You will also need an air filter to remove all of the sawdust that will fly around. If you do not get an air filtration system, the air conditioning coils will quickly get plugged up. I got an air filtration system that hangs from the ceiling so it does not take up any of my limited floor space.
 
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"...and the shop was a "comfortable?" 85 to 90*."
George; look into raising the Albedo effect of your roof colour. You can achieve a significant drop in interior temperature.
http://whiteroofproject.org/wp-cont...-of-high-albedo-roofs-in-an-urban-climate.pdf
I'm also thinking insulation. Most people don't think about needing much insulation in a desert region... but it also helps to keep "hot" out and "cold" in.

From and my parents still live in Eastern Washington, a little thought of desert region, where temps are not uncommon to get above 120 degrees. I can still remember putting insulation in a building when it was 128 degrees outside (never measured it inside). Not a real pleasure when you're sweating and all those loose insulation fibers stick to you. ::scratch::scratch::
 

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Think Pink

I'm also thinking insulation. Most people don't think about needing much insulation in a desert region... but it also helps to keep "hot" out and "cold" in.

From and my parents still live in Eastern Washington, a little thought of desert region, where temps are not uncommon to get above 120 degrees. I can still remember putting insulation in a building when it was 128 degrees outside (never measured it inside). Not a real pleasure when you're sweating and all those loose insulation fibers stick to you. ::scratch::scratch::
I'm so glad I'm retired and not having to do that anymore! Makes my skin itch just thinking about it.
The worst part is taking old insulation out, full of rodent droppings and urine, not to mention the odd mummified rodent corpse. :cray:
 

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I use a side draft cooler in my workshop in the Mojave. 107 here yesterday and the cooler only drops temps by 20-25 degrees, so it is still warm inside. I have partially insulated the shed, especially the ceiling, which helps a little, but I think full insulation would really make the difference I also lined the shed walls first with aluminum coated bubble wrap before putting in the block foam insulation I used. Do the insulating BEFORE you put up shelves and cabinets, it is a massive chore to go back to insulate later. I had water just outside the workshop (shed) so it was easy to run 1/4 inch copper line to the cooler. Be sure to get a flaring tool for the copper fittings or they can easily break loose and spill a lot of expensive water before you notice. Every exterior faucet has cut off valves at the base, same with the cooler source. Amazing how often these puppies break. Find a store where you can get schedule 80 pipe for any runs above ground--all it takes is one freezing night to have your pipes burst. I also used a threaded T at the lowest point in the 1/4 inch run. Water goes straight through from source, into the T, with a 1/4 fitting on the other side. The third outlet has a threaded stopper that lets me drain the system before winter. Finally, I also have a fan that directs some of the cool air to the far reaches of the shop, which is where I have my workbench.
 

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I live in Phoenix, AZ. Summers get real hot (100+). Would welcome any ideas on how to cool down my garage/workshop so that I can get some work done in the summer months. Central airconditioning is not an option.
I would like to put my 2 cents in here if I may I live in Winnemucca, NV and it runs right around 100 to 100+ and I am using a swamp cooler in a 12x20 shop with cast iron table saw, band saw and jointer and no rust, works great. Just stuck it in a window.
 

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I would like to put my 2 cents in here if I may I live in Winnemucca, NV and it runs right around 100 to 100+ and I am using a swamp cooler in a 12x20 shop with cast iron table saw, band saw and jointer and no rust, works great. Just stuck it in a window.
And I'm betting Roger Miller's guitar strings didn't rust while in Winnemucca. :lol:

Keep a heads up on dew point temperature and all will be OK.
 

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I would like to put my 2 cents in here if I may I live in Winnemucca, NV and it runs right around 100 to 100+ and I am using a swamp cooler in a 12x20 shop with cast iron table saw, band saw and jointer and no rust, works great. Just stuck it in a window.

welcome to the forum, Rodger.
 

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The first money I would spend would be on as much insulation your walls and ceiling can handle. Then with the size of your shop, it should keep it usable. I am fortunate to have 10" walls and have that much insulation in them. I have 16" to 20" in the ceiling. In the summer when it reaches 95 degrees the shop will stay a comfy 75 degrees with a small window AC unit. In the winter I run a 110 volt ceramic heater that keeps the shop at 70 dehrees even when it gets down to 0 degrees. The shop is 480 sq ft. That is the benefit of having plenty of insulation.
 

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Joe, I live in LA where we not only get the heat but huge amounts of humidity (LA=Lower Alabama). We have been using the portable units on wheels on our job sites for years. These are the ones that Scott suggested, that discharge through a 4" hose. We solved the sawdust problem by building a filter box for the intake. it is a frame covered with blue filter cloth. The cloth is held in place by staples and can be easily changed when dirty. You can also prolong the life of the cloth if you periodically blow it clean with a leaf blower from the back side.
 

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I suggest you to load some of your gears and put it on a backpack. Google finest natural/nature pools in America. Pick your best bet and prepare yourself for a couple of miles hike. Of course, you should have the bucks for it. If you reach your destination or the pool you chose, for sure you’ll never know what hot means. Opps! Am I on the wrong thread? My mind came up with a summer getaway. :sold:
 

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Joe, I live in LA where we not only get the heat but huge amounts of humidity (LA=Lower Alabama). We have been using the portable units on wheels on our job sites for years. These are the ones that Scott suggested, that discharge through a 4" hose. We solved the sawdust problem by building a filter box for the intake. it is a frame covered with blue filter cloth. The cloth is held in place by staples and can be easily changed when dirty. You can also prolong the life of the cloth if you periodically blow it clean with a leaf blower from the back side.
Troy-

That was actually a fantastic idea! I wish we had such on our jobsites.
 

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I live in Phoenix, AZ. Summers get real hot (100+). Would welcome any ideas on how to cool down my garage/workshop so that I can get some work done in the summer months. Central airconditioning is not an option.
Why not opt for a regular air conditioner.You could mount it in a wall,
 
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