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My garden shed got lifted up in a recent gale I didn't have the doors shut.
Several pictures here, Shed by Peter Goodchild | Photobucket
As you can see the right side has blown out. If can raise shed, somehow should be able to
push back more or less into its original position. Do you have any suggestions how I could
sort it out? Panels are all just bolted together.
I have an engine hoist, in the UK we have what are called Acrow props these are used
for supporting brickwork, they come in various sizes. Size 1 extends from
1.753m - 3.124m for what this looks like see Ebay UK item number
181711100646
I was wondering if I might be able to use say 4 of these at each corner of the shed,
with a length of 4x4 timber between the pairs to lift up the metal roof trusses?
Though these I don't think are incredibly strong. If they will support the weight of the shed.
I could then pull in the blown out side.
Any ideas?
Thanks
 

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unbolt the damaged panels....
straighten them...
straightening one panel is pretty straight forward and you'll be able to do a much better job...
and doing a whole wall at a time may generate worst issues...
reassemble the shed...

don't know why but I can't get into photobucket...
I believe your Acrow method will work if you only do one side at a time...
 
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My garden shed got lifted up in a recent gale I didn't have the doors shut.
Several pictures here, Shed by Peter Goodchild | Photobucket
As you can see the right side has blown out. If can raise shed, somehow should be able to
push back more or less into its original position. Do you have any suggestions how I could
sort it out? Panels are all just bolted together.
I have an engine hoist, in the UK we have what are called Acrow props these are used
for supporting brickwork, they come in various sizes. Size 1 extends from
1.753m - 3.124m for what this looks like see Ebay UK item number
181711100646
I was wondering if I might be able to use say 4 of these at each corner of the shed,
with a length of 4x4 timber between the pairs to lift up the metal roof trusses?
Though these I don't think are incredibly strong. If they will support the weight of the shed.
I could then pull in the blown out side.
Any ideas?
Thanks
Peter,

This is a typical light gauge garden shed. The only way to do anything with it is to take it apart and try and straighten out the metal. Unfortunately, the gauge is so light that I'm afraid that without the right equipment to straighten the metal it'll never look right.

I have had this exact same thing happen. I determined that for what the cost of the shed was, the labor involved, and the aesthetics of the bent up and creased panels just wasn't worth it.

I know that this isn't what you want to hear, but I would just replace the shed.

It looks like you have a concrete slab that is set on. I fabricated some "Z" hooks and attached the metal frame on the bottom to the concrete. The new shed never move through three hurricanes. It was, however, crushed by a pine tree when Katrina hit the Gulf Coast in 2005.

Bill
 

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I'm not sure if your props are similar to what we call a jack post or not. The jackposts are used to support floor beams from a crawl space or basement. They would certainly lift that building with no effort. Keep in mind that if the entire building is raised on the posts it becomes unstable and will fold up unless the support posts have been cross braced to each other or guy lined to anchors. I've seen these little sheds get twisted out of shape before so it may be necessary to cross brace on the inside across the ribs.
 

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Go with sticks suggestion.
It may take you longer but you have a better chance at realigning a single panel at a time plus you'll likely to expose unforeseen problems during the dismantle, like stripped bolts, deformed metal at bolt connection points.
 

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The first thing to do is get everything out of it so you can work on it. You might find that it is easier to move back in place than you thought.
A 2X4 and a block used as a lever will probably be all you need, those sheds aren't that heavy.
The Z clips are an excellent idea after you get it realigned.
It wont look brand new, and the doors might not slide as good as before, and it might leak here and there,and the wind might whistle thru the cracks, but at least it won't be leaning against the fence.

Herb
 

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...I'm with the disassemble, straighten, re-assemble crowd.

You could use some temporary lumber to hold it up while working on the disassembled panel and then let it back down...

I would have lots of extra nuts and bolts handy...you're likely to run into some real rusty ones...

And for those that are too rusty, just cut them off and replace...something like a Dremel tool with cutter disk will do the trick...
 

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Slightly different approach; abandon the metal sides and build a light frame and Hardiboard siding. You must have something similar over there?
Install the existing roof on the new structure. This time, bolt the sucker down to concrete footings or slab.

https://www.jameshardie.com/Products
 

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I'm with Herb. I think once you get the shed cleaned out, it may be easier than you think to reposition the shed, at least partly where the undamaged sides are.

A cheap come-a-long would help pull it back in place if you tie off to a fence post. You might be able to tie off on the inside and pull the out of whack side back into place. Loosening some of the bolts should help.

Good luck.
Mike
 

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Hi, I think that the first thing to do is empty the shed out and have a look at what needs doing. Once empty see if the walls are worth keeping, if not rebuild the walls out of 4 by 2 and shiplap boarding, remembering to anchor it well to the concrete base. Then reuse the roof. To prevent a repeat of the previous problem provide an escape for any strong wind that gets inside by providing maybe a weighted lift up panel at the back of the shed that the wind can lift up to escape. I did something similar on a conservatory roof, I left the front edge free to lift up with a strong force from the inside, this worked on one of the very severe storms we have had.
Good luck,
Alex
 

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Don't frighten me, Peter.

My shed is similar to yours and has just been sitting on the ground for 25+ years.

I believe the fact that it is in a corner and the wind has to rise over the fence has saved it many time....
 

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Naw, just a dirt floor, which is a pain when it rains....
 

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add pavers..
For the price of the pavers, you can form it up and pour two yards of concrete and have a nice, dry, level floor>:)
 
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For the price of the pavers, you can form it up and pour two yards of concrete and have a nice, dry, level floor>:)
Hi Bill, I thought of that when I moved in, but as I was/still am renting did not want to go ahead.

In 20-20 hindsight, that would have been a good idea....:frown:
 

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Hi Bill, I thought of that when I moved in, but as I was/still am renting did not want to go ahead.

In 20-20 hindsight, that would have been a good idea....:frown:
Hmmmm! I see, your renting. So, do you plan on moving anytime soon? I you are will you even bother to take the shed with you? If the answer is you're there for a while and/or have no plans to take the shed, then I would suggest this.

Talk to your landlord and see if he/she will pay for the permanent improvement. the landlord pays for the slab and gets a metal shed. If he/she won't spring for the whole cost see if he will split the cost with you.

It never hurts to ask. The worst he/she can say is NO!

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #20
OK thanks everyone. Didn't get any notification that people had replied. Will get back to several posters, to elaborate their replies.
Cheers.
 
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