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But then you would be confessing your 3 failures...lol

WOW! $350 on that dado kit...but it really is pretty cool. I wish I could have one...and the table saw to put it on. LOL

I do like the first one, though. But it's not "that" hard to get a 90-degree hole with a hand drill, really. Then I just lean into it, brace myself on it, to keep it there as I go. Only way that would help me is when I am drilling above me where I can't be eye level with the work, but that's only been a few times. But also, my cordless drill, has a level on the butt end of it, so as long as I can see the bubble, I will know I am on it. With that laser circle, it would seem you could rely on it too much and think as long as the 2 circles aren't touching, then you are 90-deg, but there is a bit of play in those 2 circles, also.

2nd one, a lot of band saws and even my Bladerunner X2 uses bearings to reduce friction, but I suppose the extra set at the bottom would be an improvement.

Guess the 3rd one is the most inventive/unique. He would be better off just to sell the plans for the makeshift one that people can DIY with at home.
 

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Very interesting Don. The first one is a good one if you need vertical holes consistently. Usually a good approximation is enough. I drill a hole through a wooden block with my drill press and use that for a starter block when I need them that accurate. The second one I just don't do enough of to make it work going for the rollers. A solid wooden one is enough. The 3rd one isn't cost effective even if I just copied it and I'm not sure it wouldn't plug up with hardened finish which means you would have to take the lid off to unplug it most likely which would defeat the purpose. It's not frequent and short term exposure to air that is the problem in most cases, it's the sporadic openings over an extended time that ruins finishes.
 
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The man is providing answers when there are no questions.
 
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Maybe a Teflon (or Teflon coated) stopper and seat would solve the "stuck shut" problem with the finishes. But I can foresee an economic problem in that it may be necessary to use a costly manufacturing process to lap the stopper and seat for an effective seal. Perhaps a quick (and cheap) sprayed on or injection molded stopper and seat wouldn't provide the necessary precision.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Very interesting Don. The first one is a good one if you need vertical holes consistently. Usually a good approximation is enough. I drill a hole through a wooden block with my drill press and use that for a starter block when I need them that accurate. The second one I just don't do enough of to make it work going for the rollers. A solid wooden one is enough. The 3rd one isn't cost effective even if I just copied it and I'm not sure it wouldn't plug up with hardened finish which means you would have to take the lid off to unplug it most likely which would defeat the purpose. It's not frequent and short term exposure to air that is the problem in most cases, it's the sporadic openings over an extended time that ruins finishes.
I can not drill a straight hole. I have to have some kind of help. ""Mental"" :frown:
 

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I don't have room for a drill press, I've used my router with a straight bit to make a temp guide before, works pretty well.

I like the idea of the roller guides but not if it's anywhere near the price of the dado blade set. Like Festool, nice stuff but way out of my budget.
 

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Yes, JOAT's suggestion is very effective. I have one that I bought over 45 years ago when I put a open baluistered railing in my last house. About every 5 years it saves me again. Fixtures can be attached to hold the work, but this tool lets you get the angle and depth of hole perfect. Any hand held electric drill works with it as the power source. It's also great for drilling in the center of round work because of the V guides in the top of the base. There are two pins that come with it that you can screw into the bottom of the base that let you drill for mortised locks or other uses where the hole has to be centered in the edge of a door or board. Just place the jig in position, rotate it until the two pins hit alternate sides of the board, and then drill the hole. When I drilled the balluster holes in the railing I made a fixture that centered the rail under the base of this tool, then I set the angle and depth of cut. I then just slid this fixture along the bottom of the rail to each marked position and drilled the holes. They were perfect.

This tool is also very handy when you need precision, straight or angled holes in a project that is too large for your drill press. With it you can drill perfectly positioned straight or angled holes in the center if a full sheet of plywood, if you should want to.

I've used mine more for drill press replacement than for any other purpose. If you don't own a drill press, this tool makes a handy replacement and it's a bargain at that price. I think I paid about $25 for mine 45 years ago. Straight or precisely angled holes are easy with it and center drilling is a bonus option.

Charley
 
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