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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's a picture of the gouges that came with my lathe. Until I tried to turn a piece of pine the other day, I don't think they had ever touched wood. They definitely need sharpening, and I am looking for a used bench grinder, or even a new one if it isn't prohibitively expensive.

I think these are supposed to be spindle gouges. Am I right? :blink: The bevel on the other side of them is between 30 - 40º, except for the narrow (3/8") one that seems to be about 25º, but has more of a taper than a bevel. I have to return some stuff to MLCS, and I am wondering if I should ask them to send a roughing gouge along with the replacement items (router stuff)

This is not an expensive set of chisels, but seems reasoanbly well constructed.
 

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No pictures. I expect you need to get to 10 posts before the forum will allow you to post pics (or some such).

In general:

1) Roughing gouge is a good thing which you appreciate when turning big square things into smaller round things. Others might disagree but I say: make sure you get one that is big enough.
2) Bench grinder is a must for any turning unless you can splash $400+ for Tormeks etc. I have two. One of them is a Jobmate from Canadian Tire which cost me less than $40 and which is doing a stellar job (unlike other Jobmate tools:).
3) Unless you are really skillful with sharpening I suggest you get a jig of some sort especially for the gouges. I built a couple but was never quite satisfied with their performance and in the end I bought the Woverine jig.
 

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crquack is dead on the money with the roughing gouge, I don't think you can get one too big, but you can certainly get one too small DAMHIKT.

A 1750 grinder with the wolverine system is where I found my sharpening satisfaction after trying nearly every method on the market including the Tormek.

See if you can get your pictures loaded so we can help you a little further.
 

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Hi crquack

Check the Introductions folder and you will see many have uploaded pictures without having 10 posted items..here's just one of many ▼

http://www.routerforums.com/introductions/24822-hello-all-first-post.html

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No pictures. I expect you need to get to 10 posts before the forum will allow you to post pics (or some such).

In general:

1) Roughing gouge is a good thing which you appreciate when turning big square things into smaller round things. Others might disagree but I say: make sure you get one that is big enough.
2) Bench grinder is a must for any turning unless you can splash $400+ for Tormeks etc. I have two. One of them is a Jobmate from Canadian Tire which cost me less than $40 and which is doing a stellar job (unlike other Jobmate tools:).
3) Unless you are really skillful with sharpening I suggest you get a jig of some sort especially for the gouges. I built a couple but was never quite satisfied with their performance and in the end I bought the Woverine jig.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok, let's try this again...

I think I may have forgotten something basic before, like actually attaching the pics to the post once I had found it.
 

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Check with woodcraft. They have a good low priced slow speed grinder for $109.99 and get the wolverine jig for sharpening. Makes life a lot easier. The Tormek which I have with the woodturner jigs is about $900. Good system and does a excellent job but is pricey. Crquack hit the nail on the head. A 3/4" or 1" roughing gouge will fill most of your needs. I do have a 2" roughing gouge but seldom use it on smaller shorter spindles. I use it mainly on leg spindles for chairs, longer spindles, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks, Bernie, et al. I'm asking if these are in fact spindle gouges. If they are, then I don't have a roughing gouge in the kit. Should I get one?

I plan to start out by turning some miscellaneous practice turnings until I'm getting the hang of it, then maybe a couple of baseball bats, and then I want to do some table legs. Later on, I'd like to do bowls.

I've been eyeing an 8" Ryobi grinder at the Home Depot. It looks like a capable machine that I can afford even on my salary as a penniless civil servant.
 

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They look like spindle gouges. Hard to tell the sizes. The one on the left is what - 3/4"? I have seen that shape used by Richard Raffan for roughing small pieces.

One comment about the bench grinder: Note that Wolverine *do not recommend* using a slow speed ginder with their jigs. Ordinary 6" or 8" grinder running at 3450 rpm will do just fine. The trick is to get the right wheels - white aluminum oxide, 80 - 120 grit. Many sources of those. Visit the Wolverine web site for useful info.
 

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Roger I think what you have are some older spindle gouges. I am pretty sure they are probably carbon steel. They can be used and will have a good edge but will have to be sharpened quite a bit more than often than High Speed Steel. If those are what you are going to use then yes I would get a 3/4" minimum to 1 1/2" roughing gouge. Here is the set I bought 6 yrs ago and still use most of them today even though I have a lot more of the expensive tools. I find myself going back to them at times. You get everything needed for doing spindles and bowls. These will do well while learning to turn. Then you can add tools as you see what is going to be your interest in turning.

Set of 6 Benjamin's Best WOOD Magazine "Best Value" HSS Lathe Chisels at Penn State Industries

Here is another great set for the money.

Set of 8 Benjamin's Best HSS Lathe Chisel Set at Penn State Industries

I talked with Oneway about the wolverine jig and grinders. Crquack they told me it doesn't make any difference if high or low speed. I have been using a slow speed since I have been turning and I like it better because if like me and you put to much pressure on the tool they get hot real fast and discolor the metal. I like slow speed and that is just my preference.
 

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I talked with Oneway about the wolverine jig and grinders. Crquack they told me it doesn't make any difference if high or low speed.
That is good to know. However the OP has limited means and slow-speed grinders are more expensive, at least locally.
 

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Crquack I bought mine from Woodcraft on sale for $89 and they generally are not bad at $109 plus they have the wheels you need.
 
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