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The name is Roger and I'm from Ohio. I've been working on a century old house for the past couple of decades and have collected a sizable amount of woodworking tools in that time. It finally dawned on me one day that I could have a decent shop setup. So that is where I'm at for the moment. I'll be making room for the shop in a basement storage room. It's about 12' X 22-1/2'. I'm cleaning the area out right now and will be framing it in and drywalling it soon. I'm going to bring in a 240V 60A circuit for a electric sub-panel in the room for all the outlets and tools. Trying to figure out the layout but a little overwhelmed at the moment. Any suggestions would be most appreciated! One of my goals would be cabinet making for the shop first then the house. I'll be checking in with updates and I'm sure asking a ton of questions.

Thanks,
Roger
 

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Rick
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Welcome to the forum Roger. Looking forward to seeing your shop . Just an FYI , we love pictures :)
 

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Welcome to the forum, Roger. Grizzly Tools has a free customizable shop layout tool on their web site. Works pretty well. You might want to take a look at it.
 

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Ross
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Welcome to the forum Roger.
 

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That's about half a garage space. Lots of us have shops that size. Table saw typically goes near the center, length wise. I put the right side of my 36 inch saw up against the wall. My cutting tools are on one end of the shop, beside and beyond the table saw. The other end of the shop has a LOT of tool and small parts storage and a workbench down the middle. The table is about 20 inches wide, but has a fold down 16 inch fold away extension that usually up.

I have some wire shelving mounted on the back wall and lots of identical plastic tubs with fitted tops fulled with tools and parts, all labeled on the end so I can find stuff. The back wall on the other end of the shop is all pegboard so I can hang all kinds of tools and accessories up there. These are items I use occasionally that I've found myself wanting to buy over and over when they're out of sight. By hanging them up, I remember I have them.

Below are some pictures, but the general ideas is all the cutting tools go on one end, the assembly area is on the other end. I have a lot of clamps hanging on the back wall. On the front wall, on the cutting end are tools all on castors so I can pull them out. Every tool has its own shop made stand so moving them for use and cleanup is easy. I keep the big band saw, jointer and planer in the garage. I have a Harbor Freight 2hp dust collector with a fine metal drum filter on it. I have a shelf for long pieces of picture frame material that is suspended from a high spot in the ceiling.

There are drawers under the workbench that hold hand planes and chisels, a junk drawer and a drawer to store a few sawblades. It's tight in there, but manageable. On the wall beside the workbench, I installed shelves that hold finishing stuff, glue, rechargeable tools and batteries. and a catch-all shelf on the bottom. The bottom 16 inches of wall all around are kept clear to make cleanup easier.

I wired this so there are 3 110v circuits, 20 amps each. The three circuits alternate and are color coded so I can avoid overloading any one circuit. One handles the LED low draw lights and the AC and heaters. Another powers the dust collection, and the third the tool I'm using at that moment. The circuits start in one corner and the circuits are alternated on each stud around the one side and front wall. I have never missed plugs on the back wall. I have one light that's on a timer, I can leave it on 1, 2, 4, 8 hours. Nice because it's dark out there. You will want to make sure you can turn the lights off at the top of the stairs to make a safe exit.

I put the 14 inch band saw in the garage, where it fills in one wall with the other tools and the HF dust collection out there. I keep a smaller band saw in the shed, which is more than adequate for most tasks. It stands right beside the door. A bench drill press sits next to the door on the other side.

In my shop, one end has a 24 inch wide counter across the full 12 foot width of the shed. If I were doing this again, I'd just put up a couple of narrowere shelves and leave room underneath to store lumber. One of these days, I'll rip out the wide shelf--that extra foot will make it easier to move around the bench. The router table stands against the back wall, between the table saw and work bench.

I installed high lumen LED lights in both the shed-shop and the garage. Low draw, really bright.

Hope this is helpful.
 

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John
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Hello and welcome to the router forum, Roger
 

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because if breaker spaces need for separate circuits...
strongly recommend a 100amp or larger panel...

now I went w/ using the same wall space twice in this satellite shop...
this shop is smaller than yours..... 14x16'..
under the wall cabs is a chase for the DV, air and electric feeds...
the doors slide... Roller tracks.. SGD wheels on the edge of an angle iron...
the cabs are 12'' deep...
by not using conventional cabs (BTDT) gained me valuable floor space and extreme simplicity/flexibility...
there is also a TS, BS, DP, wet saw. SCMS, wood rack, 2 more clamp racks and a BMW F650...
the drawers needed are in the table.. more can be added as required...
the inside of the cabs is set up for storage, hardware, bins, plane rack, more tools, and a host of all the stuff you see on open shelves in other shops..
the biggest benefit is everything stays clean w/ the doors closed...
shop is way easier to clean too...

.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks everyone!
Tom and Stick, thanks for the pictures they help a lot!

Roger
 
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