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Hi all and greetings from Finland, Europe! Here is a new member who has not hold a saw in over 30 years! Current closeup and changing life values has woken a new interest to woodworks and other handicraft in me. So far I have purchased a router and a table saw (a table/mitre combination actually) and now I am struggling to make my first wooden box. You know, the simple model with just a bottom and four sides with 45 degree angle joints. After about half dozen more or less failed samples I have started to collect more information about varied tools and techniques instead just rushing to make same mistakes again. I think it was Albert Einstein who said: “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” >:)

Have a great weekend everyone!
 

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Hello, welcome to the forums Juhani...
We're happy you found us...

About that inquisitiveness of yours... We are all over that, we can help, yes we really can, because we have some ''light reading'' for you that will fix that...
What we've done is gathered together a bunch of pertinent/relative information on routering in this here link ...
You should find most everything (at least most) quite useful, a lot of help and get you off to a running start in the world of routers...

Enjoy...

Do take some time to read the safety PDF's... PLEASE!!!
Blood and trips to the ER, we find, are very annoying... Not to mention – expensive...

You have question about something???
We welcome all questions here on just about any subject you can come up w/ too....
Not only that, we love and excel at spending money... Especially when it's yours....
 
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David - Machinist in wood
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Welcome to the forum, Juhani!

We do like photos so show us your shop, tools, projects, etc. whenever you're ready. What sort of woodworking are you planning or doing after the box?

David
 

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Welcome!! I am a newbie to CNC and let me tell you, these folks are the most generous, kind and sharing folks you can find. Everyone is more than willing to answer questions (no matter how dumb my questions are) and help us learn from their knowledge base. You will love this place!
 
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John
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Hello and welcome to the router forum , Juhani
 
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Theo
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Ah, Finland, the home of Steve'n'Seagulls. Welcome aboard.
 
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G'day Juhani, welcome to the forum.
 
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Welcome to the forums Juhani. As you may know already there are a ton of ways to make boxes and each requires a different approach. If you're set on the mitered cut then you'll need to pay particular attention to setting up and adjusting your miter gauge to the table but 1st you'll really want to make sure everything about the table saw is set accurately. This example is only one of many available to see how this should be done. If you Google table saw tune-up you'll get a good idea of what's out there. Once this is done and done well you'll have much better cuts on everything you do. Accuracy will be key to tight, no gap fitting joints. I t will take some time and patience but when you're done you'll know that saw far better then you do now. And usually the stock miter gauges aren't that accurate but you can make them better. Good luck and report back your results.
 

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Mike
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Welcome to the Router Forums Juhani.

Remember one thing, if you are not making some mistakes now and then you are probably not be making anything. All of us make mistakes from time to time.

The more you work in your shop the better your projects will get so just keep working at it. When you get a few projects made post a few pictures so we can see what you have been making.

If you have any questions we have a lot of answers for you.

Work safe, have fun.
 
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Hi and Tervetuloa!If. Making boxes is a good start, making them with 45 degree (mitered) corners is more challenging. Since you have a table saw, you can easily connect these joints better if use a method called a spline. You cut the 45 degree angle with your table saw, then cut the same angle in the cut off edge (about 5-6 mm deep) to create a slot. Then you cut a piece the thickness of the slot, but about 10-12 mm wide and the height of the box sides. Glue it first to one side of the jont on each piece, let that glue set, then glue the other corners together. Use the fence on the saw as in the picture below to cut the slot and you should get a strong, easy to clamp box. To set the blade to precisely 45 degrees, you will want to have a digital angle finder such as the one in th epicture, made by Wixey. Without it splined joints on the table saw are very difficult to get just right.

Splines are a great way to build many otherwise difficult joints, and they are easy to make and very elegant when you use a contrasting wood for the spline. Over here a full kerf blade is 1/8th inch wide. Not sure about Euro saw blade width, but that is slightly more than the thickness you will need for the spline. One of the pictures shows how you set the blade to 45 degrees and cut the mitered joint spline

Making the same thing several times and learning from each try is a wonderful way to learn, especially when you are just starting. You have two of the most basic shop tools already, so you're off to a good start. The only other must have is a good sized bench model drill press. With those three tools and a few hand tools, you can make a LOT of things. Once you master those tools you will probably want to add more.

If I were starting over, knowing what I know now, I'd get a few of the following, a very good block plane, the small hand model about 125-150mm long low angle block plane (at least $100 U.S., and probably available used for a little less, and a good set of at least four sizes of highest quality chisels you can afford. You will need to learn to sharpen those tools so you can shave hair on your arm with them, but there are lots of videos on sharpening using simple sand paper.

Another tool I really didn't think much about until I got one is a decent sized band saw. The one I use most is about 10 inches, but if I had just one, I'd get a 14 inch model. These are remarkably versatile tools.

I would also suggest you start accumulating clamps. Over here we have economy model clamps from a company called Harbor Freight so the most often used, the 10-12 inch F shaped clamps are only about $3 each. But you will gradually want to add some longer ones as you take on larger projects, such as cases to mount your tools on and store your shop items in.

You'll soon begin to run into a lot of terms and methods that might seem overwhelming at first, but just keep tackling one at a time and you'll soon be turning out good stuff. BTW, the pdfs Stick posted are like a free textbook on safety and all kinds of aspects of woodworking.

And just about everyone here is very happy to answer questions and suggest ways to get things done.
We are all happy you joined the fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Welcome to the forums Juhani. As you may know already there are a ton of ways to make boxes and each requires a different approach. If you're set on the mitered cut then you'll need to pay particular attention to setting up and adjusting your miter gauge to the table but 1st you'll really want to make sure everything about the table saw is set accurately. This (url removed because I'm not allowed to post them as a new user, not even in quotes) is only one of many available to see how this should be done. If you Google table saw tune-up you'll get a good idea of what's out there. Once this is done and done well you'll have much better cuts on everything you do. Accuracy will be key to tight, no gap fitting joints. I t will take some time and patience but when you're done you'll know that saw far better then you do now. And usually the stock miter gauges aren't that accurate but you can make them better. Good luck and report back your results.
Yes, there has been various reasons why my previous attempts have failed. My measuring was off, the source material was not straight, my glueing and clamping techniques were bad etc.

Though I have corrected most of them, I’m now seeking to replace my 45 degree joints with something more refined. Dovetails and my last interest: joints created with a router lock miter bit. I have tried to saw dovetails manually, but it seems that some kind of dovetail jig is needed.

I have a bad habit to try solve things by buying more stuff instead of try to figure out smart solutions by tools currently available.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Welcome to the forum, Juhani!

We do like photos so show us your shop, tools, projects, etc. whenever you're ready. What sort of woodworking are you planning or doing after the box?

David
I have many hopes regarding my future wooden “masterpieces”, but nothing certain. I just selected small box for my first subject because I think making a box requires many basic woodworking skills which would be useful in the future as well. Something like “when the skill is gained a need will appear” etc. :nerd:

Also boxes (even not so successfully manufactured) are useful items in garage etc. And finally – since my country house has 2 wood burning stoves – the evidence of the worst failures are very easy to dispose. :grin:
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
That was very interesting & informative, thank you very much for your post!

I’m starting to think that my original idea of purchasing a combination saw (Makita LH1040F) was a bad one since the table saw functionality is very limited. For example it doesn’t allow to change blade angle. I can do angles with mitre part but the max length of the item is very limited. One option would be to sell LH1040 and purchase separate table and mitre saws with more capacity and options.

Hi and Tervetuloa!If. Making boxes is a good start, making them with 45 degree (mitered) corners is more challenging. Since you have a table saw, you can easily connect these joints better if use a method called a spline. You cut the 45 degree angle with your table saw, then cut the same angle in the cut off edge (about 5-6 mm deep) to create a slot. Then you cut a piece the thickness of the slot, but about 10-12 mm wide and the height of the box sides. Glue it first to one side of the jont on each piece, let that glue set, then glue the other corners together. Use the fence on the saw as in the picture below to cut the slot and you should get a strong, easy to clamp box. To set the blade to precisely 45 degrees, you will want to have a digital angle finder such as the one in th epicture, made by Wixey. Without it splined joints on the table saw are very difficult to get just right.

Splines are a great way to build many otherwise difficult joints, and they are easy to make and very elegant when you use a contrasting wood for the spline. Over here a full kerf blade is 1/8th inch wide. Not sure about Euro saw blade width, but that is slightly more than the thickness you will need for the spline. One of the pictures shows how you set the blade to 45 degrees and cut the mitered joint spline

Making the same thing several times and learning from each try is a wonderful way to learn, especially when you are just starting. You have two of the most basic shop tools already, so you're off to a good start. The only other must have is a good sized bench model drill press. With those three tools and a few hand tools, you can make a LOT of things. Once you master those tools you will probably want to add more.

If I were starting over, knowing what I know now, I'd get a few of the following, a very good block plane, the small hand model about 125-150mm long low angle block plane (at least $100 U.S., and probably available used for a little less, and a good set of at least four sizes of highest quality chisels you can afford. You will need to learn to sharpen those tools so you can shave hair on your arm with them, but there are lots of videos on sharpening using simple sand paper.

Another tool I really didn't think much about until I got one is a decent sized band saw. The one I use most is about 10 inches, but if I had just one, I'd get a 14 inch model. These are remarkably versatile tools.

I would also suggest you start accumulating clamps. Over here we have economy model clamps from a company called Harbor Freight so the most often used, the 10-12 inch F shaped clamps are only about $3 each. But you will gradually want to add some longer ones as you take on larger projects, such as cases to mount your tools on and store your shop items in.

You'll soon begin to run into a lot of terms and methods that might seem overwhelming at first, but just keep tackling one at a time and you'll soon be turning out good stuff. BTW, the pdfs Stick posted are like a free textbook on safety and all kinds of aspects of woodworking.

And just about everyone here is very happy to answer questions and suggest ways to get things done.
We are all happy you joined the fun.
 
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