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Ok,
I need your help. I’m building a hall tree out of Poplar (because my wife wants it painted. The legs are 1 3/4” square and the rails and stiles are 1” with 1/2” plywood panels. My initial plan was to use a large plywood panel where people normally put a mirror. I wasn’t aware that my wife also wants a mirror.
My problem is, if I was going to put a mirror in it, I wouldn’t have made the back legs so beefy. I could have used 3/4” material and cut a cope and stick and somehow lock the mirror into the groove, but I’d have to cut the back part of the groove to allow mirror replacement if needed. However, I didn’t use cope and stick joinery, I used Dowels, so cutting a cope and stick profile where the mirror goes will be tricky (stopped)Any suggestions on how I can now inset a mirror
Maybe I could still cut the dados and insert my plywood panels and glue the mirror to the plywood. I used a dado stack to cut all the dados on the rails and stiles for the storage area, but I will probably have to use my router table for the long 1 3/4” legs.

Thanks in advance for any guidance or direction.

Jim


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I'd put a thin Masonite or ply back, put the mirror and use something like quarter round to hold it in place. I wouldn't glue the mirror. Have a glass shop cut the mirror to exact size, they have the know how, and it will be a custom size. Don't think you neef thick backing to stiffen the whole structure. Pre cut, fit and paint the half round (or any other shape) before you install it. If you use a square trim instead of half round, it will keep your sharp lines, and sanded and painted, it will look line one piece. You can insert the mirror from the back. It's a really like a rabbet.

You might need to add a small piece behind that lower rail for the mirror to sit against.

Or you could rout a small rabbet in the inside back of the vertical pieces the mirror fits in, leaving enough room to add and affix your backing. You'd square up the rabbet's rounded corners. This could be done with a rabbeting bit. If you do this, secure the piece to your workbench so it doesn't move on you. This would better be done on a table if you haven't glued it up yet.
 
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