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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So after all these years it seems I've been seduced by hand planes. I had the pleasure of being introduced to some very well tuned hand planes recently and my initial thought was why bother when I have both a quality jointer and planer. Then I was able to see and use a few well tuned hand planes and something changed. I looked again at what my father-in-law used to use and thought that I needed something better. They hadn't been used in years and had been sitting in a cardboard box in my dry basement for 16 years and likely they hadn't been used in that many years or more prior. Dad was 3 months shy of 100 when he passed in the winter 2001. While we had many conversations over the years, at that point I had been married to his only daughter for 14 years, and most of those years her parents had lived with us. Off subject but that was a wonderful time for all of us. These were indeed some wonderful people. Unfortunately for me I was so busy with work that we shared precious little time in my shop so I wasn't able to learn from someone I considered a self taught elite woodworker. That I have regretted ever since.

Anyway after Dad hung up his shop apron I inherited his hand tools and was grateful but sincerely didn't see true value in his gift at the time. Even though they might have been humble tools they were certainly capable in the right hands as he had proven many times. And then I took a harder look after reading more about hand planes and their proper use. Now I've read and watched a ton of information on the various types and uses that I've taken a much closer look at what I have. I need to find an iron for a transitional plane and the either make or find a replacement tote for an old Stanley Sargent #409 that I've bought. The usual teardown cleaning, sharpening, adjusting, and so forth will be done to put these back into working order. It's not a distraction rather more an education primer to hand planes.

Any suggestion on sources for parts would be welcomed. I've done a preliminary search and most lead to Ebay listings. Even a source for templates for making the knobs and totes for various vintage planes would be great. I could always try my hand at making one.
 

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Steve - I've restored a few hand planes over the years - some days I'll just plane some scrap wood for the sheer pleasure - and boy are they quiet.

I did order some parts packages direct from Stanley years ago - totes, knobs, screws, bolts but I'm not home right now to see where they actually came from. I did find this website that you might be interested in:

Stanley Plane Parts
 

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welcome to the awakening Steve...

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the link Vince. Don't know why Google didn't return that when searching for Stanley tote replacements.

Stick,

I should have known you'd have a library for me. A quick glance after just getting home from PT, where's that ice pack, and most looks like material I haven't seen yet. I'd have to say that having flattened the backs and sharpened all my new Narex bench chisels that I think I have that down fairly well. Flattening turned out to being a challenge but then one of the guys at Woodcraft said I was getting to critical. I later found out that just in front of the mouth, along the sides, and probably the heel are the more important places on the sole and the iron itself primarily the last inch or so of the iron where the two cutting edges meet. I do like my DMT DuoSharp plates and as long as they last I'll continue to like them. I did go with a DMT Extra-Extra Coarse plate to take the flat don faster and then progress to the coarse, fine, and then extra fine. I finish off lapping the tools with the compound and a leather strop which is like 15,000 grit. Regardless the bevel gets a fine mirror finish and you can shave the hair on your arm. My only suggestion is if you have a clotting issue don't try this on your arm, get a sheet of paper and see if it's razor sharp. So far I haven't been disappointed.

One term I haven't looked into yet is where they will make a comment about the jappen being say 95%. I have no idea what that refers to.......yet. And no, it wasn't referred to as a Japanese plane. I got the feeling it's something to do with maybe the steel or cast iron condition.
 

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One term I haven't looked into yet is where they will make a comment about the jappen
make that Japanning...

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
As expected, I've been schooled on Japanning now. Seems I came across that term many years ago but like some things it just didn't come up enough to burn into memory. From what I have read so far it appears to have been adapted from the Asian's back in the 16-17th centuries. No wonder I forgot.....interesting reading though. Thanks again guys.
 

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For best irons, Hock Tools is a great source. Hock Tools Home Page He has an occasional e-newsletter.

I also love hand planes. The big ones are Wind River, pretty close right out of the box. But I have a Stanley block plane and a couple of odd makes that I've tuned up nicely. A Veritas router plane tops the list. I also love to use diamond stones. After each use, I generally give chisels a few strokes to keep them razor sharp, including a little stropping with compound.

I'm another who will pull out out some scrap wood and make some shavings just to hear that sound, and to relish the glass smooth finish they leave.

Stick's library is pretty amazing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So I took the transitional plane apart this afternoon to inspect the parts. All hardware appears in good shape, threads on bolts and screws are in good order, frog needs cleaning, and the chip breaker is a bit rusty but I think it will clean up. I took measurements and the wooden sole is 8-5/8" long and it's three widths (coffin plane) are from toe to heel: 2-3/16", 2-1/2", and 1-3/4" the mouth is 2-1/2" from the toe. Hope this makes sense. Now I need to figure out which iron needs to be gotten to put this plane into service. My guess is a 2" wide blade but the length is questionable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I also popped into a local vintage store this afternoon and found what I think is a Stanley No 180 Rabbet plane but it's really hard to make out in it's current condition. The pictures actually made it a bit easier to read but the light wasn't that good. Not sure this is worth the asking $20. There was also a Dunlap plane but I hadn't heard of those before and will need to look up some info on them. It wasn't in terrible shape. The asking on that was $30 minus a 20% discount so $24. I did spot a few old wooden planes but they had been poorly repaired or just in rough shape. At $10 a piece they might sit on someone's shelf but likely see little if any use without a lot of work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
That looks like a surgical tool!

I did some looking up on Dunlap and it seems it was a lesser line carried by Sears and not of a very high regard apparently.

What I found enticing about the smoothing planes, and frankly now my #62 Stanley, is the feel of the wood when planed with a well sharpened iron. I don't think I've ever felt wood that smooth before. My sanding has never been that fine I don't think. But I won't get addicted he said as he took another drag......My aim and goal is to have some hand planes that fit my needs to augment the machines in my shop. Someone gave it the name of Hybrid woodworking I think. Just a nice mix of the two.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Actually did some more digging and then a call to Mr. Hock himself and explained the situation with the transitional plane. I now have a 2" iron headed my way for this plane. He did say his chipbreaker likely wouldn't work but I think I can rehab this one. Now for a gallon jug of vinegar....and some pvc w/cap. I spent a bit more time in the shop cleaning up and then my eye caught that #62 sitting on the bench and an old piece of scrap that I had disfigured with the chisels so I took that 11" board back to square on both long ends. Shavings so thin you can see through them. Now it isn't so much scrap...Iron should be here by next Monday at the least unless really bad weather slows it down.
 

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I have Hock irons...
I much prefer the Veritas VM-11 by far...
 

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get a sheet of paper and see if it's razor sharp.
don't just cut the paper...
shave off half of it's thickness in a sweeping motion......
 

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theres much knowledge in that head you must have to use corks in each ear to keep in all in.
once again amazed
that deserves a ''SNORK!!!''
 

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As expected, I've been schooled on Japanning now. .
now there is a plan ''B'' for that...
High Temp rattle can applied in many as in a lot of very very thin as in just barely a dusting of coats...
 
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