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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK router geniuses!!! throughout the router forum, i have noticed that some people actually end up making a router table to benefit there needs. some people have told me to use a counter top to use for the router table top. with that i just came across a brand new 31" wide counter top that i would like to use to build the table top. it is 31" long by 21" wide. could someone please help me out by explaining how to build one of these router tables? i am very new to wood working and would like to build my own router center but not sure if it is more for an advanced woodworker or fine for a rookie as myself. iv'e noticed that rockler sells a router table plate that lays in the hole in the top of the table but im not sure how t even begin to cut out the needed slot. any help would be appreciated.

reds_21 :confused:
 

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Hi Reds_21, I too plan on building my router table when the time comes and like yourself, I am a rookie. I have been looking at the set up at Oak-Park at this link

http://www.oak-park.com/usa12.html

40620 Kit which includes plans for constructing the table as well.

You may want to check it out.

There are many plans out there for router tables from super simple to the ultimate. You may even want to check out Norm Abram's router center at the New Yankee Workshop, it is a cadillac for sure and I know many have used his plan as a model to build from.

Keep us posted on your progress.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
router table continued

this is reds_21,,,,,,below is the counter top that i was able to come across that i wanted to use towards my home made routing table. you will notice that it has the built in splash guard. do i have to do away with it or is there an advantage to it????? it measures 31 x 21,,,is that too small or is it usable? :)
 

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Hi, Red_21:
If I were you I would buy a plate to fit yourrouter from Oak-Park the sponser of the forum. They also sell a plan for the router tables that they sell. You can then adapt
your top to the same plan. The plate requires a 11" X 11" opening but the hole in the
top must be 3/8ths of an inch smaller to support the plate. They have plates to fit
all types of routers, go to the web site and you can look it up.
I use the Oak-Park table and it's been very good. Hope this helps.

Woodnut65
 

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The plate you saw in the first link is the Rousseau. Black with red/grey inserts. This plate is my choice since it is readily available. They sell a template and guidebushing with a collar that makes installing it a breeze. They sell kits for centering your router on the plate to mount it. This is the easiest way to go for your first table. Dont worry, you will end up selling it and building more.
As far as the backsplash on your counter top I would remove it and I would also remove the slight bump on the front side as well. Its designed to keep water from running off the top and both may interfere with clamping. It limits the ways you can use your top and makes it difficult for setting up jigs.
 

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As an intermediate woodworker and a novice router enthusiast, I thought that building my own table would be an excellent first project.

I had nearly all the materials already on hand (thanks to a carpenter-friend who was completing a commercial renovation), so I started scouring the internet looking for plans. The first place I went was one of my favorite woodworking sites, "woodworkersworkshop.com". I was not disappointed. They had around 20 links to sites featuring free plans for router tables!

The table I ended up building was based on several of the ideas I took from different plans, and has so far done exactly what it is designed to do.

Maybe many of the readers here may be familiar with the site, but if not, it is worth a visit.
 

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Hi, Reds 21:
21" X 31" for a router table is good, the Oak Park table is even smaller, and it works fine. The size you have will allow for a good size cabinet below the table top that will come in handy for bits, tools, templates and fixtures.
Good luck with it. Woodnut65
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
woodnut65!!!

wahoo!!!!!!!i was hoping to hear that it could be a good top. as for plans on making a router table out of it,,,,,,,,,,are there any plans out there that will actually tell me step by step in detail on how to make it? im very new to wood working and have no clue how to start making a table/cabinet underneath. i know what i want but i don't really have a clue on how and what to use and when........any help on that? i need something very similar to a for dummies book or set of directions.

thanks, reds_21
 

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Plans are everywhere for cheap. Oak Park sells theirs for $4.95, Woodsmith has a great table and their plans were free with a trial subscription. $4.95 will buy you an issue of Shopnotes with plans for table building.
 

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Why buy a plate. I bought 7 pieces of 1/2" thick 10.5" square HDPE plastic on E-bay for less than $15 including shipping. I'll put a rabbit all the way around and if it's to thick I'll route a circle where the router fastens.

These were advertised as cutting boards, and come to think of it that's what they'll be.
 

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I made my plate out of the same material as the top.... 3/4" laminate covered plywood.

At the time, I had more material than money, so I went about it as cheap as I could! You may want to spend money instead of time. Also, the results aren't quite as slick as manufactured plates.

From the start....

The top of my shop-made router table is two pieces of laminate covered plywood. The bottom piece has been cut large enough to allow my King router to pass through. The top piece has a hole cut (and router-trimmed) to allow my plate to fit into snugly.

The plate is the same material as the top plate, and it rests against the bottom piece, creating a smooth top surface. I cut the plate on the table saw and then prepared to mount my router to it. Realizing that the 3/4" material would limit the depth of cut that I could perform as a table-mounted operation, I traced the outline of the router base plate onto the bottom of the table mounting plate, and then proceeded to cut a 3/8" groove to accomadate the base plate. Then I put the router into this groove and secured the plate to my router. Then I slipped both router and plate through my table top until it bottomed on the lower table-top.

The plywood will eventually wear out and I'll need to fix it, but for the time being, it is rock-solid-cheap!
 

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Alternative Router Table

I am new to the forum and by no means do I want to come in and sound like a 'know it all'. I've been woodworking for around 30 years and have been thru more router tables than I care to think about. But I finally found the one I like better than any other I've ever used. It is a totally different design, uses a home shop built lift mechanism and doesn't use a removable router mounting plate. I subscribe to American Woodworker, and they published the plans in their March 2004 issue. I built the lift mechanism, scrapped my old table and built one to their design for under $100. It is simply the best table I've ever used. Fast and simple to change bits or lower or raise the cutting depth. I had someone else on this forum request to see my table, so I put a few pictures and some commentary on my personal webspace. The table I built is not pretty, but extremely functional and timesaving. When I get time I'm going to rebuild it to make it prettier, but it works great so I've never found the time to redo it. Also, I use 1/2 shank bits, and have made raised panel doors for a couple of projects, and the mechanism is more than strong enough to maintain accuracy.

If you'd like to look at it and form your own opinion, the link is:

My router table

It will come up to the first page of pictures of my table. Look it over and see what you think.
 

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JCouch said:
I am new to the forum and by no means do I want to come in and sound like a 'know it all'. I've been woodworking for around 30 years and have been thru more router tables than I care to think about. But I finally found the one I like better than any other I've ever used. It is a totally different design, uses a home shop built lift mechanism and doesn't use a removable router mounting plate. I subscribe to American Woodworker, and they published the plans in their March 2004 issue. I built the lift mechanism, scrapped my old table and built one to their design for under $100. It is simply the best table I've ever used. Fast and simple to change bits or lower or raise the cutting depth. I had someone else on this forum request to see my table, so I put a few pictures and some commentary on my personal webspace. The table I built is not pretty, but extremely functional and timesaving. When I get time I'm going to rebuild it to make it prettier, but it works great so I've never found the time to redo it. Also, I use 1/2 shank bits, and have made raised panel doors for a couple of projects, and the mechanism is more than strong enough to maintain accuracy.

If you'd like to look at it and form your own opinion, the link is:

My router table

It will come up to the first page of pictures of my table. Look it over and see what you think.
WOW.... that thing is great!

That has got to be about the coolest set up I have seen yet. I have marked your link in my favorites for when I get ready to build my router table.

I believe you are about to get bombarded with questions and requests for plans on this one for sure.

Just when I thought Norm's table was going to be my target, you come along and post this, oh well, I have been know to change in mid stream before :p

Good job sir!
 

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router table

As much as I'd like to take credit for this lift mechanism and basic table design, I can't. The actual design came from a contributor to American Woodworker Magazine. I simply followed instructions. But if you build it, you'll immediately wonder why anyone would use a different type table. It just makes so much sense. You never have to remove the router to change bits, simply raise the table top, press in the shaft lock, loosen the collet nut, change the bit, tighten collet and that's it. Cutting depth changes are as simple as turning a wrench. And using the 16 thread/inch rod, adjustments are a snap. One turn, 1/16th of an inch. Quarter turn, 1/64th of an inch. Two turns....1/8th inch. Couldn't get any simpler or faster. I love the table. It makes the chore of changing bits and setting an accurate depth of cut a breeze. No removable router mounting plate to move around or pinch a finger. And since I've got the router motor wired to a switch, there's little chance of the router turning on automatically. (Although I do normally disconnect the power cable from the motor housing, just for safety.) There are many commercial mechanisms out there for raising and lowering the cutting depth, but they are really pricey. Most I've priced were over $300. Mine cost me under $50 to build myself, and I honestly believe it is stronger and just as accurate as the commercial models.
 

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Hi: Reds-21, as far as designing and building a table to go below the top you have,
I would suggest that you look at various plans for tables, to start with. Look for the way they are put together. You know space has to be left for the router itself, and this space will get plenty of router debris. I have the Oak- Park table, and many of the
accessories. I built a cabinet to go below there table for storage and used pretty much the construction they used, mine is on a roll around set of wheels, Sears had on sale. But if yours is to be fixed in place you won't need them.
My email is [email protected] you can get me on that for any info
that I may be able to supply.. Good luck.. Woodnut65
 
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