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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I saw this little chamfer and edging plane for $36 on Amazon and decided to give it a try. Nice, fast, needs a little sharpening (as most planes do). But for anyone who likes using hand planes, this is a pretty nifty item to have on hand. The base has a V shape so it fits the edge nicely, and it comes with a number of different shaped blades (see picture) which might inspire you to try some novel edges, say on a table leg. Best to take small amounts off at a time, particularly with the more M and W shaped cutters.

To me, the knurled knob that raises and lowers the bit could be a little smoother. And you may find that the cutter catches on the body of the plane, so a little wiggle frees it up. It's a pretty inexpensive plane so don't expect a Veritas. BTW, it has a small spirit level built in, although I'm not sure why. I guess that for someone doing finish work who needs to make sure something's level.

Here's a picture and the Amazon link.
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Here's the link Amazon.com: Tidorlou Chamfer Plane with 7 Cutter Heads for Wood, hand planer for Woodworking,chamfer Planer for Quick Edge Trimming,Portable wood planer: Home Improvement
 

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I would like to know how well each of the cutters work, with pictures if possible. Looks like it would be a handy plane to have... if it works well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have no doubt that the Woodpecker plane is a beauty and performs well. I have a couple of their proucts. However, I don't use it nearly often enough to justify spending that much money. This is only about a quarter the price and you'll probably want to tune up the cutters by sharpening and polishing them. I see that the Woodpecker has the base that's in contact with the wood milled, this one doesn't. But the mechanism for raising and lowering the cutter is identical and includes a locking screw to stop blade slippage or wobble.

I'll try to take some pictures, but I'm not quite at the point of using it on my current, slow motion project.
 

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I am still interested in seeing the results of the molding irons of your new gadget. I see plenty of times I would use them. I like the ability that this plane has... the potential is there. It would be nice if the molding irons are available in right and left hand matched sets for using the plane on wood that has rising grain in the opposite directions.
 

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I have no doubt that the Woodpecker plane is a beauty and performs well. I have a couple of their proucts. However, I don't use it nearly often enough to justify spending that much money. This is only about a quarter the price and you'll probably want to tune up the cutters by sharpening and polishing them. I see that the Woodpecker has the base that's in contact with the wood milled, this one doesn't. But the mechanism for raising and lowering the cutter is identical and includes a locking screw to stop blade slippage or wobble.

I'll try to take some pictures, but I'm not quite at the point of using it on my current, slow motion project.
The guide you are referring to on your new plane is the spring angle (45 degrees). By holding the spring angle against the edge, and parallel to the edge as you progress with each stroke... until the opposing spring angle of the plane contacts the wood and it stops planning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
DesertRatTom, I am still interested... Can you please answer my questions?
Sorry for the delay, had a demanding project to do.

It is painted, probably powder coated. It is not aluminum. It didn't rub off. After seeing the more expensive model, I realized that they ground the V groove that rides on the wood. I'm thinking I might be able to use a very fine file and then a diamond stone to grind off the coating. I don't think it would have to be a perfect grind since it's just rounding an edge. But I'll likely keep it as is for awhile. It isn't ever going to get daily use. I'm happy with it. BTW, I found a little plastic box at HD with dividers. If you live in a humid climate, you could toss a bit of desiccant in the box.
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I was more interested in the molding irons... and how they work. Have you tried them ? To use the molding irons, you must hold the plane at a 45 degree spring angle and progress downward until it quits cutting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
I was more interested in the molding irons... and how they work. Have you tried them ? To use the molding irons, you must hold the plane at a 45 degree spring angle and progress downward until it quits cutting.
No, I haven't, other than the roundover and chamfer. The irons are a max of half an inch wide, and they don't reach down that far to use them as a molding plane. Theoretically you could cut off the 45s to make it flat, but there are much better choices for that purpose.

There's a brit, Paul Sellers, who does a blog and some videos focused on hand panes. I know I saw him make several kinds of wood planes. They're not that hard to make, and you can probably find irons at Hock Tools. I don't know hether or not they can provide exactly the shape you want, but you can also make them from chisels. Just don't grind them so much they lose their temper. Here's the Sellers website. You can also find them on YouTube.


You can contact Hock Tools direct.
HOCK TOOLS
Office: 16650 Mitchell Creek Dr.
Shop/Shipping: 711 B North Main St.
Fort Bragg, California 95437
Call us: (707) 964-2782
 

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Hock blades get very high ratings in the hand plane world.....
 
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