Router Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,171 Posts
Essentially a dremel, and many small hobby CNC are OK using dremels. Generally limited to 1/8" diameter bits, so you'll be limited to what you can cut with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I have been looking into some thin stabilized wood for inlay purposes so 1/8 in might workout. Still trying to learn enough about different machines, lot to learn, Thanks Wyndham
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
I would suggest using the Bosch Colt trim router rather than the HF tool.
On Amazon dot com they sell the Colt for $99.00, but it will have stronger shaft bearings, have a 1/4" collet that is more universal, 1 HP at 5.6 amps (more powerful) and a machined housing that will be easier to make a holder to keep it perpendicular to the work piece.

I have found that when I tried to go cheaper, it usually cost me more in the long run. Good luck with what ever way you go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,921 Posts
Tools from HF are cheap. I would not waste my money on any of their electric tools. Many of their hand and air tools are good quality.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I have the DeWalt version, and it's awesome. I it runs at 30,000rpm and takes both 1/8 and 1/4 bits, and it only costs $52 for the corded and $119 for the cordless
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,921 Posts
The Bosch owned RotoZip would be a good choice but if you are going to spend good money you want something with a good track record so perhaps the Colt?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,921 Posts
Joe, I am no expert on any of the home CNC stuff. The new Next Wave Piranha FX was demonstrated at AWFS in Las Vegas with a Colt. Must be a reason for this. Bosch routers have been sculpting eye glass lenses for years in Horizon II lens shaping machines. Better bearings, less run out, etc..

Considering that the DeWalt 611 is about the same size as the Bosch 1617EVS (which has almost double the power) I have a hard time calling it a palm router. It is in fact a small router. The Trend T4 has more power in a slimmer case. The 611 is the only router with offset handles; what were the engineers thinking? Have you read the small router comparison thread? Out of the plunge bases the Colt and T4 are easy to use with one hand.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
349 Posts
If you plan to use smaller diameter bit in a CNC or want a perfect fit between mating parts, then you need to use a router or spindle with a known run-out or select a router that a precise collet is available for. Next Wave uses Bosch Colt routers, but upgrades them with after market collets. If you CNC something as line to line for a quality fit, a run-out of .005" can make you have a fit.
[another reason to measure the "true" diameter of a bit before committing nice wood :surprise:]

See this site: Collets, Nuts and Toolholders

Industrial CNC machines and spindles use ER collets, but they aren't available for standard routers.

Steve.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top