Router Forums banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I know hardboard gets used for work table tops and even router table tops. I read somewhere here about using hardboard that's finished on both sides. I got to doing more research on hardboard, AKA: "Masonite" the well known name brand.
Here's what I found. Seems like S2S is what's needed for my project.
https://harborsales.net/Portals/0/docs/hardboard_what_is_it.pdf

Wow, more to hardboard than I thought. I install flooring, carpet, vinyl laminate and floating type flooring etc. I use 1/8" hardboard as a floor protector to slide furniture on. Lot's of other uses. The stuff that I use has a 'sorta" hard surface and in finished on one side.
I need some good old Masonite for stability and strength if I'm going to use it for my router table's work surface. That is If I can find some. None of the 4 local lumber yards stock anything like S2S or Masonite brand.
I need to know what kind of screwing pattern is needed so the surface remains flat when I screw it onto the table. Is 6 inch spacing close enough for 1/4" Masonite (or equivalent)?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,603 Posts
Hey Randy I would use glue to attach the hard board.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I figured it would be replaceable if countersunk screws were used. I'm making an aluminum frame as the superstructure of the top.
I figure on using a combination of rectangular 1-1/2" by 1" aluminum for the perimeter of the frame and then use square 3/4 by 3/4" metal for the center cross supports. The tubing has .160" wall thickness and that's good for welding and won't sag on such short spans. I figure 26" by 32" or 24" by 30"
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,758 Posts
For my router table(s), I used Formica laminated on 3/4 inch MDF, and on 3/4 inch plywood.

The work bench top was a solid core door. I put the Formica on it also. It got quiet a workout before I passed it on to my brother in law. He loves it.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Wow, I want one of each of those........... and a shop too. :grin:

I should have mentioned that mine is made to be light and portable. A strong and extremely flat aluminum table top with a thin flat work surface. I don't have an indoor work area, or works shop, so the table top will be stored indoors when not in use......... not in use will be most of the time. I won't use this very often.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Off topic...

Each time I see a picture of Mike's dueling routers table, I intuitively love it... and I wonder what I'd do with a two router table setup. Of course this is coming from a guy who joined the forum less than two months ago for advice on his first router purchase and I've thus far resisted the temptation to buy a second. :smile:

Back to topic, if I was attaching 1/4" masonite atop an aluminum frame for a router table, I'd want very close support spacing and I'd want the router attached to the aluminum and not the masonite. If the aluminum supports were spaced 4" apart, I'd be comfortable. At 6", I think the masonite would deflect under pressure. My brain is much happier thinking of my tools as not moving at all, so I want movement below perception level.

I'd feel much better about the whole thing with the masonite attached to at least 1/2" plywood, and I'd screw the plywood to the frame from underneath. And if not for the support structure mentioned, I'd use a double layer of plywood as others above suggested.

You'll get more experienced advise from others though. I'm still a router newbie.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
double stick tape for the field and 4 corners for the screws..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Off topic...

Each time I see a picture of Mike's dueling routers table, I intuitively love it... and I wonder what I'd do with a two router table setup. Of course this is coming from a guy who joined the forum less than two months ago for advice on his first router purchase and I've thus far resisted the temptation to buy a second. :smile:

Back to topic, if I was attaching 1/4" masonite atop an aluminum frame for a router table, I'd want very close support spacing and I'd want the router attached to the aluminum and not the masonite. If the aluminum supports were spaced 4" apart, I'd be comfortable. At 6", I think the masonite would deflect under pressure. My brain is much happier thinking of my tools as not moving at all, so I want movement below perception level.

I'd feel much better about the whole thing with the masonite attached to at least 1/2" plywood, and I'd screw the plywood to the frame from underneath. And if not for the support structure mentioned, I'd use a double layer of plywood as others above suggested.

You'll get more experienced advise from others though. I'm still a router newbie.
The plywood on the aluminum as you mentioned was the same as I was thinking initially.... The possibility of using only Masonite became my thought at some point. If that doesn't feel like it will work, then the plywood will be used. I can't get arctic birch anywhere locally, but some high layer cabinet grade might be stable if sealed up well.
I'm going to have to wait to see how the aluminum table framework comes out first.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
double stick tape for the field and 4 corners for the screws..
I like that, Stick.
I'll see if I can draw up a sketch of the frame idea. I have a friend that's an excellent welder. I just need to cut the aluminum pieces accurately.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,758 Posts
Here is something for you to consider...

The portable work table I made has proven to be very handy. Just a top and a couple of saw horses and a pair of 2x4's. I cut the 2x4's so they would fit inside of the bed of my truck (68 inches).

The dog holes make for all kinds of clamping possibilities.

3/4 inch mdf with a couple of coats off poly so the glue won't stick.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
I like that, Stick.
I'll see if I can draw up a sketch of the frame idea. I have a friend that's an excellent welder. I just need to cut the aluminum pieces accurately.
I did a aluminum torsion frame from 1/8'' architectural C channel only the butt joints are draw bolted not welded...
cut the pieces to length..
TIG a 1/4'' plate that is drilled and tapped to accept the screw/bolt of your choice to the inside of the channel... I used pan head 12/24's...
set the plate back from the end a 1/4'' or so...
think screwed/bolted together butt and perpendicular joints...
the plates are faster to install...
lot less welding...
finite accuracy is not important...
you experience less material shape changing that has to be ''fixed''......
the frame can be reworked/improved w/ minimal effort..
you can slot holes to make joints adjustable/tweakable...
far less waste and errors are easily corrected...

the purpose of the raised top on the table is to allow for multiple use..
the area to the left is for the miter knife/trimmer, FMT and D4R... the router portion lends to material support if need be..

tempered hardboard (smooth both sides) is as bullet proof for a work table top as you can get...
BUT is it a poor wear surface...
nothing beats high pressure laminate on a single sheet/slab/piece of 3/4'' Baltic Birch for hardware mounting, stability, moisture/water proofing, grooving, flatness, longevity, surviving wear and tear unless it's 1'' BB or A/B or A/C fir..........
BTDT w/ hardboard/MDF and a host of other methods... all of which in the end were a waste...

the ply in theses pic is over 40 years old...

.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Here's close to what I originally came up with. If I moved the lift plate and the associated supports about 4 inches to the left, I could add a 5th cross support towards the right side.
The router and lift weighs about 20 lbs and I think those two 3/4" heavy wall square aluminum sections will easily support that weight on a 24 inch span because the 1/4" aluminum lift plate takes up a good portion of the span.
Drawing is not to scale, but sorta kinda close enough for this visual.:wink:
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
Here's close to what I originally came up with. If I moved the lift plate and the associated supports about 4 inches to the left, I could add a 5th cross support towards the right side.
The router and lift weighs about 20 lbs and I think those two 3/4" heavy wall square aluminum sections will easily support that weight on a 24 inch span because the 1/4" aluminum lift plate takes up a good portion of the span.
Drawing is not to scale, but sorta kinda close enough for this visual.:wink:
I see the need for 2 intermediate cross members in the left and right bays..
the plate boxed and one intermediate in the center bay centered and forward of the router plate..
now you really have a stable torsion frame and major support for the router.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Good images for being that old, Stick. My router will not be used very often. I won't ever do volumes of woodwork like many of you guys do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
Good images for being that old, Stick. My router will not be used very often. I won't ever do volumes of woodwork like many of you guys do.
the material is over 40 years old...
the table is closer to a decade...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
Good images for being that old, Stick. My router will not be used very often. I won't ever do volumes of woodwork like many of you guys do.
do it once...
don't spend any more of anything on your table...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I like those tables Mike, 'specially them dog holes. Lota shop space there. I wish I had something like that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Definitely tempered, Herb. From HD, I'm surprised they even mention that it's type S2S
Nearest HD is 120 miles from me. Be interesting to know who the manufacturer is.
Thanks for the link.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top