Router Forums banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's time for my silly question of the week...

If I use hardboard as my router table top would it be better for glue-up purposes to use hardboard that is smooth one side (more "tooth" on back) or smooth both sides.

I have both, I just want to use the right one.

Michael
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Hi Michael

My grandfather used hardboard for all of his wood projects and I recall him saying always glue the smooth side down, it will hold unlike the checker board side. :)

I do use it for drawers because it's strong and true and flat.
But I don't use it to offen because it will lift in time because the glue can't sink into the wood fibers to get a good bond.
I do see members use it on router tables alot and rap it with oak banding to cover the open look of the hardboard.
He always used contack glue, I recall he had it on all of his work shop benchs with many,many saw marks on it... and slotted wood screws to hold it down in place :) it's funny what you recall when you and I worked in the shop with our grandfathers. :)

I do recommend 1/4" MDF because the yellow glue will bond to it and you can keep it looking like new with just a little TLC and some Johnson and Johnson floor wax and it's slick and smooth...... :)


Bj :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Bj.
So you think mdf would make a better router tabletop than hardboard?
(I have lots of mdf too)
Hardboard seemed a little.. err, harder to me.

My table will likely be one layer of 3/4 mdf, one layer of 1/2 mdf and a top made of 1/4 hardboard or mdf for a total of 1 1/2" thick. I'm going to make one "real" table and an extra blank or two. The extras won't get cutouts for router plates.

I used to hang out in my dad's shop all the time too. He gave me a lot of the tools but not all of them yet. I have a Craftsman router that's at least 30 years old and was hardly ever used.

Michael
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Hi Michael

Well most of the time you will not drop any tools or wood on to the router table .in fact I don't let anyone put anything on my router table top and when they do they get a dirty look from me real quick. :)
You may want to use one of the extras like Bob and Rick and me ,I put 4 blocks on the bottom side so it will drop in and lock in the base plate hole when the router is not in place, In this way I have a place to use the plunge router so I don't nail the good top, works great for making wheels and other items .

Have a good week Michael

Bj :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yup, I had boomarked that thread as well as another thread with references to your table. Interestingly that was a month and a half ago and I still haven't built my new table. I did however get the Benchdog fence; very nice :)

Michael
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I got the 24" (actually it's 28"). My router tables will all be of the benchtop variety for space reasons. I currently have a Freud benchtop table so the smaller Benchdog fence works fine with it. I'm using it with the side clamps. I also have the Freud micro-adjust fence which is quite nice too.

I just ordered some uhmw for the Benchdog fence.

Michael
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
Benchdog is Awesome. and you can't beat the price for quality and accuracy that you get.
I like the built-in joining option. It took me few tries but using the 1/32” setting can give me perfect flush now with no snipe.
I used to have the Freud micro but never used it since my projects always tend to be large and it ended up on eBay along with my commercial table top and fence.
The trick to building a very accurate table is to have everything referenced to one side either front or the back and usiing the same tape measure. For instance, you want the router plate cutout perfectly parallel to the back and once you cut that, you want the T- track parallel to plate cutout.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This past weekend I milled a bunch of cherry into edge molding. I cut down the lumber with an EZ Smart saw system then jointed all the boards on the router table using the BD fence and finally ran it through again to add the edge treatment, a 30 degree bevel.

Michael
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Careful with the Johnson and Johnson floor wax!
You don't want to use wax that contains silicone it will cause uneven blotchy ness when staining your wood.
There are other waxes you can use that will not cause this problem.

The wax you are using may not be a problem but it would be a bad time to find out after all your hard work & wonder why the heck you can’t get a nice consistent stain.

Most good woodworking places may carry waxes that will work.

Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Gluing Of Hardboard

mpphoto said:
It's time for my silly question of the week...

If I use hardboard as my router table top would it be better for glue-up purposes to use hardboard that is smooth one side (more "tooth" on back) or smooth both sides.

I have both, I just want to use the right one.

Michael

For best gluing resultundefineds, it's best to use the textured surface.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top