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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I picked up tempered masonite for some templates I need to make. Seems like a very nice work surface, especially if it were sealed and poly or wax coated. Has anyone tried it as a router table top? Is there any reason not to use it? It's certainly not as bullet-proof as formica and I'm not sure how easy it is to glue and keep flat. Any insights?

Michael
 

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Michael
I have seen one or two made with it.
2ea 3/4" plywood with the tempered masonite glued on for the top .
Looks great and works great for a bit BUT then the masonite starts coming up because it's is so hard the glue will not hold on to it.
Then you end up putting screws in it to hold it down true and flat then you need to sand down the counter sink holes you put in ,there goes the nice flat top and the nice finish you put on it.
The ones I have seen the stock will hang a bit at the base plate when you push the stock over it and you need to lift it a bit to get over base and that's a real drag when you put a nick in the stock you want true and clean, no nicks.

I think it would work if you DON"T use a base plate insert,and just mount the router to the 1/4" masonite i.e. cut a 7 1/2" sq. hole in the plywood and CENTER the router in that hole.
NOTE** besure and cut your center hole 3 5/8" and make some inserts to fit that hole and a way to hold them in place.(a backup ring 4 1/8" on the under side ,will do that job)
Then when you need to change bits just drop the router motor out the bottom but the router base is locked in place on center.

Good Luck
Bj :)
 

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MP, Hardboard is a perfect surface to accept Formica. The ShopNotes plan I used for my table has 3/4" plywood then two layers of 1/4" hardboard. This is surrounded with 1" x hardwood and a piece of Formica on top and bottom. It works out great when covered and supported this way.
 

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Michael


Home made router base plate below.
http://www.routerforums.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=2279


Here's a snapshot or two of the inserts I made for my home made base plate.
Note the inserts that have a place to hold the brass guides they come in handy on the table router.

laminating formica is easy once you get the hang of it and you use the right tools ,spacer sticks, roller, and a good glue...and don't rush it wait till the glue is almost dry.
It's the best way to make the tops for just about any cabinet in the shop.
The hard part is getting it cut to the right size because it likes to chip out.
I use a router bit most of the time to cut it to a bit over size b/4 I glue it down.


Bj :)
 

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A long time ago Woodsmith had plans for a simple router table. 3/4" plywood with Masonite as the top surface and held with contact cement. As mentioned earlier, it wouldn't work with a baseplate mounted router. For my simple (beginner) needs this table worked fine but even with limited use the surface quickly deteriorted. I tried some shellac followed by paste wax. It worked okay.

Looking back I'd use formica and save the Masonite for templates.

One nice thing though, making your own table give you a good feeling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks all for the replies. Berry, your reply was what I feared. Thanks for saving me the trouble. I have a store-bought router table. At some point I'll use it to build another :) I was trying to get out of laminating formica but no such luck.
Thanks for the pics Bj, very impressive.
 
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