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Has any one made there own hardwood flooring or is it to time consumming. I have red oak rough cut 1" varing lengths. I have a dewalt 625 plunge router. Need the bit. Also have a planner. I notice that the flooring at the lumber yards have groves on the bottom of the board and a angle cut at the top where the floor joins to gether. Are these necessary.

rosco four retired and happy.
 

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Rosco
I have replace one or two (oak floors) I would say you may want to buy the stock from the lumber yard and keep your red oak for other jobs.
You can use your stock but Oak is real hard on tools and bits.
And the 4x4 stock is a bit over size for a floor and it will need to be 5/8" thick unless you want to cut off all the doors and other things so you can use it.
That's alot of wood going down the planner tube or you can resaw it with the band saw but that's alot of work.
You didn't say what the sq.ft. was but it takes alot of wood to get the job done not to say any thing about what it cost to put it down .


Have a good one
Bj :)
 

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Hi Rosco!
I have made my own hardwood flooring using 3/4" Oak stock - did it cause I only needed about 8 sq ft or so, and they would only sell it in large bundles. I did not groove the bottom side and did not chamfer the top edge because what I was matching did not have a chamfer, and I'm not sure why they do that - maybe has to do with squeaking or movement?. I suppose my tip would be to cut the grooves first, then cut the tongues to fit and since it's oak, don't try to cut it all in one pass. Not so sure about using Red oak - it has it's quirks with stains but is probably OK if you're only putting poly on it. Take your time and enjoy the ride! Hopefully someone else here can enlighten you a little more.
 

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I have to agree with bobj3, the amount of work and the problems that may arise if you don't have a good deal of experience might become one big headache.

Regards

Jerry
 

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Rosco, let me start by saying that I think flooring is beneath you... (pun intended.) I honestly believe engineered flooring is the only way to go. It is dimensionally more stable than hardwood, is available prefinished with a 30 year guarantee, and goes down in a snap. I suggest saving your energy and oak for building a special piece of furniture, clock or keepsake box.
 

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Rosco
I did a bit of checking with a mate that works for a hard floor company.
He said "The slot(s) on the back side of the flooring are put in to help stop the cuping and bowing of the floor boards."
He said it can be one or many but it's a must item for oak the flooring.
Because they only pin down one side of the floor board and it wants to bow/cup up when it's installed.
He also said that's why they keep it in the 2 5/8" to 3 1/2" wide boards.

Hope this helps

Bj :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the info and advice. The opinion seems to be that its not worth the effort and time. And I know that the floor is beneath me. :} Have two thousand board feet of rough saw oak and thought it would be a good idea seeing that it is from my own lot and cost me $200. That said i appreciate that red oak could be the bigest challnge to stain and finish. I decided thats out.

rosco p col train
 

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Silly quetstion here...
Why stain it? Why not use a clear acrylic? Sometimes I've seen stain bring out the best in a wood but, I've also seen to where it covered up what I thought was the best part.

If you've never worked on hardwood flooring, the key here is to go slooooow. Take your time, dry fit, and dry fit somemore.

All it takes is, time, effort an most important, patience.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hamlin said:
Silly quetstion here...
Why stain it? Why not use a clear acrylic? Sometimes I've seen stain bring out the best in a wood but, I've also seen to where it covered up what I thought was the best part.

If you've never worked on hardwood flooring, the key here is to go slooooow. Take your time, dry fit, and dry fit somemore.

All it takes is, time, effort an most important, patience.

Your right there it only takes time. As to the staining my better half (wonder swhy they call her the better 1/2) wants a darker stain to contrast the oak furniture we already have which is natural finish gone darker with age.

thanks for the input.
 

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If you are not using an oil finish (not likely) red or white oak is not difficult to finish. Both take all normal top coats without any problems. I have used many types of finishes on oak,with few problems.

Regards

Jerry
 
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