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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Material is poplar, I'm using a 1/16" carbide 2 flute spiral flute end mill (the kind used for cutting alum). All the edges have harry little burrs that look like they will be a pain to remove. This is after I sanded it lightly with fine paper.
 

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bit is dull...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes. That's the foresight solution. I need the afterthought solution. :D
 

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or it's flutes are sap loaded...
use a better quality bit..
use a differently rated cutter...
dental burrs perhaps...
 

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Will, End mills are not designed to cut wood. Many people use them trying to save money. Do yourself a big favor and look here for the bits you need:

Whiteside Machine Company
 
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Will, End mills are not designed to cut wood. Many people use them trying to save money. Do yourself a big favor and look here for the bits you need:

Whiteside Machine Company
I think the smallest dia he's going to find is 1/8''..
a down spiral would be a plus...
so less than 1/8'' leaves burrs..
Tungsten Carbide Lab Cutters
and wait till Harry finds out he's got burs..
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I wouldn't have thought burrs would work well in wood, but if they do (and don't leave burrs) I'll give them a try. I've used them to cut graphite and have a few bigger ones I could try but nothing small enough for what I'm trying to do currently.

Not sure about the 10 pc minimum on that site but considering the end mills I have currently cost between $20 and $40 ea, seeing these burrs for < $2.00 ea makes it easy to buy 10 even if I don't know if they'll work. :)

That being said, and back on topic, what are my options to remove the burrs on this part (since it's too late to buy new cutters). I could probably bead blast it but I'm afraid it will make it look bad when I finish it.

Maybe blasting it with compressed air and rubbing it with blue-jean rags will take them off without breaking off any more of the gear teeth.
 

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Sorry Will
I see your problem no easy fix maybe Dremel type tool with sanding sleeve no easy way time and hand repair
 

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I would use some fine sandpaper rolled to the appropriate size and lightly sand at an angle (top down based on your picture). Yes it might leave a slight rounding on the edge...canvas cloth might be better...
 
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Will, My first thought for the fuzzy gear edges are miniature files or a well honed small hand chisel. For the relief areas that are flat, a scraper modified to fit in between the gears would work quite well to smooth out the router marks. To me power tools are not always the answer. Besides that the hand work is quiet, relaxing, gratifying and without all the airborne dust. Often in antique carvings I have seen stippeling done with a punch that has a design filed into the end of the punch and when repeated all over the depressed areas makes the project look quite unique and gets rid of the machining strokes left by your router.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Will, My first thought for the fuzzy gear edges are miniature files or a well honed small hand chisel. For the relief areas that are flat, a scraper modified to fit in between the gears would work quite well to smooth out the router marks. To me power tools are not always the answer. Besides that the hand work is quiet, relaxing, gratifying and without all the airborne dust. Often in antique carvings I have seen stippeling done with a punch that has a design filed into the end of the punch and when repeated all over the depressed areas makes the project look quite unique and gets rid of the machining strokes left by your router.
/rant respectfully on/

I'm not worried about the relief areas with tool marks, it's the harry burrs on the top edge of the gears.

Funny you say that power tools are not always the answer and that it's quiet, relaxing and gratifying to do these things by hand.

It's not!

Power tools are always the answer for me and I really don't have the time, skill nor inclination to do this kind of carving work by hand.

In fact, I'm so lazy (read efficient) I don't even want to take the time to take out all these damned burrs by hand! I'd rather burn them out with a torch and move on to something else.

It's like what my wife said to me yesterday: "guy at work has a kid with an RC car and it's 'therapy' for him to work on it after his kid constantly breaks it, why don't YOU start working on it as therapy".

It is NOT therapy for me, it's heightened stress levels and frustration due to lack of quality controls and engineering front-end. If he needs a replacement part made I can probably make it in my machine shop. But I really don't want to fix it. If I did I'd be a mechanic and not a machinist. :wink:

/rant off/

Hey thanks for the advice!! :no:

I tried using a razor knife but the grain is too loose and it tends to break off. Sand paper might be the ticket. Or fire!
 

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A medium scotch-brite pad works wonders on those hairy burrs. you need to use a downcutting spiral bit to avoid the burrs.
 

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Sanding sealer, then cut strips of sandpaper the width of the bottom of the gear. Rip a piece of 3/4 face frame material to the width of the sandpaper and glue it onto the edges of the former 3/4 so you have something to grip while sanding. With the sealer, it is unlikely to take very long to knock down the fuzz. You could do the same with Scotchbrite. The wood backing will make it much easier to control that sanding down movement.
 

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Will,
You might consider an abrasive Flap Wheel. Klingspor's has several options to choose from. Also look at the ones from Foredom that will mount in a Dremel tool. Search the Foredom tool web site under www.Fordom.net/scotch-briteradialbristlediscs-3m-2aspx . These discs can be stacked on a mandrel to the size you need. The Scotch-Brite discs and mops also come in several diameters and grit sizes. As a dental tech I used these in a handpiece to get a uniform surface on metal, they were great. Good luck getting your gears cleaned up, It looks like a fun project.

Best Wishes,
Tom
 
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