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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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Yup --got 1 from the owner at the last Detroit WW show -- probably 4 years ago. Used it for 3 years before sending it back to get sharpened. The 40 tooth cuts like a 60 and the 60 cuts like an 80.

I have cut (I have a 40 tooth) boards and glued them up with no jointing.

Plus they're made close to the USA -- New Jersey.
 

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I have enough for the moment Don but I'm interested for down the road. Plus I often change from rip to crosscut but that Ridge blade might eliminate that need.
 
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You can also buy from Ridge Carbide direct. Go to their website and get on the email list and watch for a sale.
 

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New Jersey -- now that's funny. I have some friends that swear by the Ridge blades. My personal preference is Forrest but that's just me. Some things Woodpecker makes I would love to have but I'm a cheapskate and they think a lot of their stuff. What I do have is very well machined and suited to it's purpose. (bought at shows where the price was more reasonable.) I've got a couple of their etched rules that have survived for at least 20 years and my old eyes can still read them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It's nice to be able to hear from actual users, and that I know for sure are actual users and not shills. That blade is sounding pretty promising and the brand in general.
 

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Good replies but how about compared to Forest blades?
Forest blades are an excellent choice as well. Its apples to apples IMHO. Both mfg's as well as several others (Freud, Infinity ect. ) make top shelf blades with varying price points, which in many cases in the only distinguishable difference by most wood workers. While Ridge has a very limited line-up, Forest/Freud and others offer a complete line-up with blade configurations specifically targeted at specific tasks. Rip/Cross-cut/glue-line etc....

I would think that if you're a blade changer (which I am not) having an assortment of configurations and geometries would be the way to go. Having the correct blade configuration for a specific task is ideal. If your not a blade changer then having a really good one stop shop blade makes sense to me. I'm somewhere in the middle there. The only problem is when I put in my Ridge or Freud I tend to leave them in the saw, they work that well. :)

No doubt others will have had different experiences and opinions on the matter
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Most of the time I have a utility rip blade on. It works for most jobs. Usually a thin rim one to save wood. I have a glue line Freud thick rip on now. I just finished making some trim molding and I didn't want to joint them or sand very much. It was pricier than most of my other blades and it wastes a lot of wood so it's time to take it back off. I do and will always switch over to melamine blades and fine finish crosscuts when the situation requires it.

Having one that does both good rips and pretty good crosscuts would save me time when working in solid woods so switching to that blade when I need to replace the ones I have now seems worth trying and I have been hearing good things about both Ridge and Tenryu but wanted to hear from people I know are actual users. Seeing Woodpecker selling the Ridge stimulated my curiosity to ask. Woodpeckers tools are good quality, albeit over pricey, so I couldn't see them recommending a blade that didn't match those standards.
 
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