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It looks pretty nice and seems to make a good joint. Do they come in different sizes or can one size be used for different widths of wood.
Any information is appreciated. (as always)
 

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One bit will work with 1/2" and 3/4", just less material on the inside of the lock joint for 1/2". Neat idea isnt it?

Mike
 

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I've used my CMT baby lockmiter on a number of projects. It will make a lock miter from 1/2 to 3/4 inch thick material.

There are several things I've learned about this bit set. Setup is critical and the hardest piece to cut is always the one machined vertically against the fence.
1. For the setup. the height of the bit and fence depth is crucial. To get it right, see John Lucas's tips under the A/B method for the lockmiter set at www.woodshopdemos.com. This is a simple and reliable method to produce a tight joint.
2. The router speed needs to be set just a bit higher than what is normally recommended for the diameter of the bit. I've experience cleaner cuts upping the speed just a bit higher.
3. For taller pieces (in width) than your router table fence is in height, a tall fence is really, really nice for holding the piece square.
4. A feather board holding the operation square when upright against the fence is critical.

I get good results with this method for plywood and softer woods, but I'm still working on my technique with hardwoods.
 

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You are welcome! The bit set does a really nice job, except for end grain in hardwoods. The straw like nature of end grain, in oak especially has some challenges I haven't mastered yet. I think for my setup on my router table it will be in making a holding jig running the upright operation.

Now, having used the bit set, and where accuracy can be hidden, I've come to like table saw rips at 45 degrees, followed by my bisket joiner as a faster alternative. But the lock miter is definately a stronger looking joint.
 

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My problem with control has been with the vertical pieces, particularly for narrow pieces, such as small drawers. I get better cuts, almost no tear out and cleaner cuts by doing the vertical cust on as wide a piece as my router table can handle and then cutting with a table saw after that to the desired width. For example, I made a 25" vertical miter lock cut and then cut the piece into 4" pieces I needed for the drawers I was making. Since I am using plywood, having the extra 1" at the end took care of any end tear out. The bigger piece was much easier to control for a good cut.
 

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I have used the 45 degre locking miter for a couple of years now (just finished a job 2 days ago) and you can't beat it for strength and looks good as well.
A tip to make good clean cuts, both vertical and flat on the table:
Once you have the bit and fence set, take a 1/8" piece of plywood and double face tape it to the vertical of your fence, this keeps the pieces 1/8" away from their final cuts. Cut all your pieces and then remove the 1/8" plywood and recut all the pieces to their final cut.
I agree, good feather boards are a must...
 

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Awesome!

I recently have been using the lockmiter bit to make paneled looking box newels out of azek for an outdoor deck. This bit if you take the time to set it up properly and than save yourself two template blocks will leave you with extremely strong miter with minimal set up time.
 

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I recently have been using the lockmiter bit to make paneled looking box newels out of azek for an outdoor deck. This bit if you take the time to set it up properly and than save yourself two template blocks will leave you with extremely strong miter with minimal set up time.
Hi Michael,

Welcome to the forum
 

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I have used them before but they can be finicky and a real pain in set up. One day I got frustrated and developed a router table that can go from vertical to horizontal and everything in between so I could use it to make spline joints. It works great and I only have to set it up once for both pieces and I can use it for any angle.
 

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I have used them before but they can be finicky and a real pain in set up. One day I got frustrated and developed a router table that can go from vertical to horizontal and everything in between so I could use it to make spline joints. It works great and I only have to set it up once for both pieces and I can use it for any angle.
that's an innovative idea, Mark.
 

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Hi Mark

I like it :) , this is what I use to put in splines in on a angle ..works on almost all angles..I have it mounted in a bench vise, I just slide the stock by and the slot is put in place quick and easy..just one more way to get the job done...

4" Plate Joiner - Joiners - Power Tools

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Mark - that's a nifty table. Now, all you need to do is add gearing, and then little motors to move the sections. Add a remote control, and a laser guide, and you'll have a commercial product. ;)
 

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I have 3 sizes of Lock Mitre bits. I use them quite a bit in MDF and hardwoods. I generally rout a long length, then cut it into pieces for the sides, rather than cut loads of small pieces. I always do my cuts at 2 depths, by moving the fence.
 

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Thanks for the tips and the link to tthe setup guide. This is one of the bits I really want to try as soon as my new set from elite gets delivered ( Tuesday according to UPS).
Planning on doing some small boxes for my daughter and grandaughter from 1/2" oak and thought this joint would provid better strength than a standard miter.
 

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These bits look pretty nifty. I was just wondering how they would hold up over time for drawer boxes. I will be making cabinets for my kitchen this spring and dovetails are pretty time consuming when you have to make a lot of drawers,
 

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Hi Bob

I would not suggest the Lock Mitre bit for drawers you can make a drawers in 5 mins.or less with the right dovetail jig..

Katie jig

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These bits look pretty nifty. I was just wondering how they would hold up over time for drawer boxes. I will be making cabinets for my kitchen this spring and dovetails are pretty time consuming when you have to make a lot of drawers,
 
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