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Hi all --

My wife has come home with her latest garage sale finds. They are a set of cast iron oval shaped fry pans with matching wooden serving platters. For non-Texans the idea is to serve your meal smoking hot from the oven in the fry pan. The pan in brought to the table on the wooden serving platter. You have to be darned careful not to burn your self eating directly from the frying pan.

This part of Texan folk lore not withstanding, my question follows.

I wish to strip, sand and refinish the wooden serving platters. Can anyone suggest a finish that will stand up the hot fry pan?

Ben
 

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They may be better off with no finish at all. Certainly not any of the varnishes or urethanes, they are basically liquid plastics. Maybe some oils might work but if the pan is hot enough it might make the oil finish smoke and that wouldn't do much for your appetite.
 

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Hi all --

My wife has come home with her latest garage sale finds. They are a set of cast iron oval shaped fry pans with matching wooden serving platters. For non-Texans the idea is to serve your meal smoking hot from the oven in the fry pan. The pan in brought to the table on the wooden serving platter. You have to be darned careful not to burn your self eating directly from the frying pan.

This part of Texan folk lore not withstanding, my question follows.

I wish to strip, sand and refinish the wooden serving platters. Can anyone suggest a finish that will stand up the hot fry pan?

Ben


The only thing I can think of would be stove paint, like Henry Ford said; it only comes in black.....as far as I know. I use it on the steel flue for my wood furnace.
 

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Theo
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Exhaust manifold paint comes in various colors, and they're rated at something over 1,000 degrees as I recall. Any auto parts store would have them. I'd try them on scrap first.
 

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Do yourself a favor and either go with bare wood as suggested or use walnut oil. The pan should be cast iron ( for authenticity) and you may wish to route a slight indention to keep a hot pan from sliding. Being forced to move to Texas myself I understand your concerns, but remember that Texas is not a state but a separate country that never grew-up. I did it to be close to my grand-daughter so the eccentricities even out.

PS - you can always glue ceramic to it
 

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Don't use Cherry Wood - it burns quite easily! Cedars & Pines would likely have the same problem. The [above] recommended ceramic is, in my opinion; an excellent suggestion!
 

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I think with these kind of boards, you just have to deal with the resting area getting a bit scorched. I think a light oiling would be best. It'll get burnt in, but wont get too messy or stick to the pan in the process. Maybe oil it, let it cure for a few days and then stick the hot pan on it a few times before you're cooking with it, in case it does smoke or smell bad as the oil burns off.
 

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Ben; how about routing out some grooves and inserting brass or aluminum square stock, sicking proud by maybe a 1/16" +
Maybe 1/4" maximum, spaced about an 1" part, length determined by the size of the serving board.
That'll keep the heat away from the wood.
 

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Ben; how about routing out some grooves and inserting brass or aluminum square stock, sicking proud by maybe a 1/16" +
Maybe 1/4" maximum, spaced about an 1" part, length determined by the size of the serving board.
That'll keep the heat away from the wood.
It will give you an air gap, but that aluminum will be the same temp as the pan VERY quickly!
 

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Don't use Cherry Wood - it burns quite easily! Cedars & Pines would likely have the same problem. The [above] recommended ceramic is, in my opinion; an excellent suggestion!
Otis and more- To boggle your minds and give other ideas...

Cedar Planked Salmon:
Cedar plank. Optional construction is to drill out cross-wise for two long allen head bolts to help keep it together with out warpage.. Route either a shallow tray area out for the salmon or at least a route out a groove around the edge, to help keep the juices from wandering too far.

Soak in water for 2-4 hours. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Put int plank for 5 minutes to preheat plank. Rub plank down with olive oil.

Put on salmon. Coat with dijon mustard, sprinkled brown sugar, dill. Plank int over (375 degrees) for 15 minutes. Switch the oven to broil for 5 minuets or until the top is bubbling and brown.

Turn off oven. Open the oven and use a spatula to remove the salmon and put it onto a serving plate. Leave the cedar plank in the oven and let it cool in the oven, as the oven cools (slowly).

The purpose of the these cooking directions is not to share the recipe, but to rather show that wood can be and is used in high-heat applications if prepared.
 

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Cool Mike, My brother told me a recipe that is similar...
Catch a carp - 5-11 pounds, gut it and remove the eyes.
Pack the interior with chicken giblets, olive oil & fresh chives.
Attach the carp to 3/4" plywood 7" wide x length of fish; with one small (all metal) C-clamp at each end of fish. Preheat oven to 375. Add salt and pepper to suit taste and drizzle with lemon or lime juice liberally and cover fish and board with heavy foil. When oven reaches 375 slide the fish, etc. onto a low shelf. Cook for 22 minutes. Let this sit on stovetop for about 5 minutes.
Unwrap fish. CAREFULLY remove the C-clamps. Remove the fish and wrap in 3 layers of newsprint. Put the newsprint-wrapped fish in a huge zip-loc bag. Put zip-loc bag in garbage can.
Eat the board.
 

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Good one Otis but what kind of finish did your brother put on the plywood to hide the taste of the carp?
 
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