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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all.

I'm a new woodworker and just picked up a router like this one:
canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/maximum-fixed-plunge-router-0546810p.html

In hindsight, I should have gotten a smaller/lighter one as this one is pretty bulky to work with.
I suppose it's versatile since it can take 1/4 and 1/2" bits, but I don't know if I'll need to use 1/2" bits.

I'm having a hard time removing bits after using the router, but it looks like I'll have to turn the collet more to get it to self-release. I'll try that when I get home.

Hope to find some good info here. Thanks!
 

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hello N/A and welcome to the foru7ms...
new guy ya sat w/ collet issues...
have we got a self help section for you...
much of which can not be ignored or treated lightly ESPECIALLY SAFETY...

there are PDF's here on safety, maintenance, methods, jigs, tooling, accessories, aides,
set up, and so much more...

PLEASE take the time to read them.. Your health, welfare and safety matter here...



.
http://www.routerforums.com/general-routing/133402-welcome-forums.html
 

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CT Router

Welcome to Router Forums!!
That looks like a pretty good Router to start with; 2 hp and versatile use. You WILL get into using 1/2" bits sooner or later. This router has enough HP to drive some of the larger cutters. May I suggest you investigate using a "MUSCLECHUCK" with your new Router! A bit costly, but you won't be sorry for investing in total safety with this chuck adaptation. I've never had a bit slip or come loose with a MUSCLECHUCK. I've not used a CT brand router before. Hope you will do a review here for us soon. Hope it's all good times for you now that you are very well equipped.
Happy routering/woodworking.
 

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Hey, Tap; welcome!
The thing with power tools is you will need (at some point in time) ready access to an authorized repair facility, whatever the brand. Parts and knowledgeable service technicians trump purchase price every time.
On the !/2" vs !/4" shank bits. Buying both in duplication isn't economical. Go with the 1/2" shank whenever possible. Way more robust.
In the spirit of full disclosure, I have a both shank sizes but I prefer to use the 1/2" shanks whenever possible, the exception being small radius round-overs on edges...for that I use my Ryobi trim router which only accepts the 1/4" shanks.
Being a fellow Canuck (BC), I am well versed in the CT culture. For our American friends it's sort of like K-Mart but more oriented to cars and tools... ;)

Canadian Tire Flyer June 8 - June 14, 2018
 

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That’s actually a mid size router. The big ones are 15 amps. You can go to a trim router for light jobs. I’ve had a few of CT’s Maximum branded tools and they’ve been pretty decent for the most part. Their policy if repair parts are not available is to give you a new one so for 5 years you’re good to go.
 

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I have an older one of their routers that looks similar. I'm confident you'll find that when you open the collet nut, it will get loose but the bit is still tight. Turn the nut more and you'll feel resistance again as it enters release mode. Then the bit should slide right out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
@tapin4par - welcome to the forum from a Canuck from southern Ontario. By your user name, I'll take a wild guess that you golf too. Woodworking and golf - can't beat either hobby.
Thanks for the welcome everyone!

I didn't realize there were so many woodworkers from Canada here. I am in SW Ontario, Newmarket, to be exact.

You guessed right; I'm an avid golfer as well. I
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have an older one of their routers that looks similar. I'm confident you'll find that when you open the collet nut, it will get loose but the bit is still tight. Turn the nut more and you'll feel resistance again as it enters release mode. Then the bit should slide right out.
Thanks I will give that a try. I left it in at the time since I didn't want to take pliers to it and potentially ruin the bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
That’s actually a mid size router. The big ones are 15 amps. You can go to a trim router for light jobs. I’ve had a few of CT’s Maximum branded tools and they’ve been pretty decent for the most part. Their policy if repair parts are not available is to give you a new one so for 5 years you’re good to go.
Yeah the warranty is part of reason why I got the maximum brand, as well as an employee discount on top of boxing week sale price.
 

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Sometimes a collet nut has two tight points and you have to go past the first tight spot to the second to get the collet to release. That's not universal, but so long as the first twist loosens, you're turning the right direction and unlikely to cause a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Sometimes a collet nut has two tight points and you have to go past the first tight spot to the second to get the collet to release. That's not universal, but so long as the first twist loosens, you're turning the right direction and unlikely to cause a problem.
Yeah I loosened the collet nut past the first tight point and the bit released very easily.
I thought either the router was defective or the shank expanded too much from the heat to release. Now I will use my router more often!
 

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Does your local library have used book sales once in awhile? (The locals bring in the books they no longer need, and buy others for a nominal price...$1 ea here).
The reason I ask is that I live in a community where over 50% of the population is over 55. Life being what it is, there are frequently widows bringing in the Dearly Departed spouses books!
A great place to find real steals on woodworking and other trade type books.
 

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Thinking about your situation, I hope you'll consider setting up your router in a table. This can be anything from a commercial table, to a chunk of plywood with a hole in it for the bit. A table is much safer for a lot of router operations than working freehand.
And if the weight is a factor for you, a table mount will be more manageable. If your search the site, you'll find large numbers of posts about building your own table. To me, nothing beats making tables and stands for all your tools as a way to build up your woodworking skill.
 
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