Router Forums banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, my names Mike. I just wanted to stop by to introduce myself and give my thanks to everyone who contributes here, there really is a wealth of knowledge on this forum.

I first stopped by a few months month ago, I've really been looking into getting a 48x48 machine from CNCRP and thus far you guys have really helped me in making my decision just from reading what you guys post. A friend of mine bought one about a year ago and he absolutely loves it. I really appreciate any advice you guys offer going forward.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,212 Posts
Welcome. The CNC guys here are producing some very nice stuff. I don't have one, however, I've posted several times on making money with one. If you search the site, you'll find it if you're interested.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,212 Posts
Hi, glad you joined the chatty bunch. Vegas is about 2+ hours from here, south. This is a great group of folks and our CNC people are pretty accomplished and always willing to help. I don't have a CNC-not my interest area. But I did post a piece on making money with one. Here's the page: https://www.routerforums.com/cnc-routing/114441-making-nice-living-cnc.html

The discussion goes on a good bit and is very interesting and practical. I suggest you read the whole thing to get the full flavor and information. It sparked a lot of comments from the top CNC folks on the Forum. Whether or not you have a thought of making some dough, I think you'll find some useful information there.

BTW, we love seeing pictures of projects. As you get going, please post pictures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Welcome. The CNC guys here are producing some very nice stuff. I don't have one, however, I've posted several times on making money with one. If you search the site, you'll find it if you're interested.
Thanks Tom, I have read some of your posts, very informative stuff.

I am looking to make money with the machine at some point, nothing full time but to supplement my current income. I'm trying to keep my expectations low in that regard. I've got a lot more learning to do before I see that as a possibility anyway. I've never run a cnc machine before but everything I read says to buy your second machine first. I've looked into a lot of the low level hobby machines but they don't seem like they really cut it if you're looking to be serious in any way.
 

·
Administrator
David - Machinist in wood
Joined
·
4,359 Posts
Welcome to the forum, Mike! And thanks for completing your profile. Sometimes it's like pulling teeth to get folks to do that.

The CNC world is fascinating and I use ours almost every day. What will you be building and using yours to create?

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Welcome to the forum, Mike! And thanks for completing your profile. Sometimes it's like pulling teeth to get folks to do that.

The CNC world is fascinating and I use ours almost every day. What will you be building and using yours to create?

David
Thanks! I did notice in reading that you guys are always asking for the profile update so I wanted to do it right off the bat. My thought with the machine right now is to make consumer type products, cribbage boards, cutting boards, bird houses, doll houses, switch covers etc. and market them online. I know there is a lot of that out there already but my goal is to make things that already exist in designs that do not. The end goal being to create a brand so that I can sell under that brand. A friend of mine who has a CNCRP machine does a lot for the business that we currently work at. He makes them award plaques, signs etc. and they are constantly bringing him more work. He's looking to get out of that so that's an area that I wouldn't mind getting into as well. In the end I'd be happy getting the machine to pay for itself, anything after that is a bonus.

I currently sell online (reselling) on the side so I'm really looking to be able to create products as well and not have to constantly source them. Any and all criticism is welcome, I'm new to this and learning as I go.
 

·
Administrator
David - Machinist in wood
Joined
·
4,359 Posts
Right now I sell through Etsy and have work from the largest trophy shop in our area. I use the CNC for a lot of what I do for them and most of what I do is in Walnut. There are still a lot of options I haven't looked at yet for marketing and sales, though. Having a CNC is definitely a great addition to any shop.

David
 

·
Super Moderator
John
Joined
·
6,973 Posts
Hello and welcome to the router forum,Mike
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lovinglife

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Right now I sell through Etsy and have work from the largest trophy shop in our area. I use the CNC for a lot of what I do for them and most of what I do is in Walnut. There are still a lot of options I haven't looked at yet for marketing and sales, though. Having a CNC is definitely a great addition to any shop.

David
David,

The work in your Etsy shop looks great, I especially like the cutting boards.
 

·
Administrator
David - Machinist in wood
Joined
·
4,359 Posts

·
Registered
Mike
Joined
·
3,959 Posts
Welcome to the Router Forums Mike.

I thought I was Mike from Nevada and now you tell me you are Mike from Nevada. Of course, I'm Mike from Nevada, Texas so I guess we both can be Mike from Nevada.

I'm glad you are really looking at the available machines and considering what you will be doing with a CNC down the road. The entry-level CNC machines do have some good points to consider for the average backyard woodworker but they do have their limitations for people that want to use them for actual production work. The entry-level machines can be used for light production if you work within the limits of the machine. Stepping up to a heavier, faster machine lets you do more jobs with good quality results.

If you can afford the better machine and know you want to use it for production work it will save you time and money to buy it to start with than to buy a cheap machine to start out, with the thought of using it as part of your learning curve. Most people find that the cheaper machine loses its value quickly and then you have the headache of selling it to recoup at least some of your money.

I think you will find the CNCRP machines just what you are looking for in a CNC.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks, Mike! I don't know if you've seen it yet but our CNC build is posted here, might be of some use to you - "http://www.routerforums.com/cnc-routing/97721-2nd-build-first-cnc-router.html"]2nd Build (first) - CNC router

David
I just finished spending a couple of hours reading through that threat. Awesome machine. I wish I could do all of my own electronics like that and save myself a bit of money. Your level of skill putting that machine together is very impressive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Welcome to the Router Forums Mike.

I thought I was Mike from Nevada and now you tell me you are Mike from Nevada. Of course, I'm Mike from Nevada, Texas so I guess we both can be Mike from Nevada.

I'm glad you are really looking at the available machines and considering what you will be doing with a CNC down the road. The entry-level CNC machines do have some good points to consider for the average backyard woodworker but they do have their limitations for people that want to use them for actual production work. The entry-level machines can be used for light production if you work within the limits of the machine. Stepping up to a heavier, faster machine lets you do more jobs with good quality results.

If you can afford the better machine and know you want to use it for production work it will save you time and money to buy it to start with than to buy a cheap machine to start out, with the thought of using it as part of your learning curve. Most people find that the cheaper machine loses its value quickly and then you have the headache of selling it to recoup at least some of your money.

I think you will find the CNCRP machines just what you are looking for in a CNC.
Haha, thanks Mike. Yeah the limitations of the smaller machines is what pushed me to go for something a little bigger. I'd much rather grow into the machine than grow out of it.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Haha, thanks Mike. Yeah the limitations of the smaller machines is what pushed me to go for something a little bigger. I'd much rather grow into the machine than grow out of it.
Hi Mike and welcome. That’s true with most machines. I decided quite a while back that it didn’t make much sense to buy a machine just barely big enough to do what I wanted and then have to sell it for a loss and buy the bigger one I should have gotten to start with.
 

·
Registered
Theo
Joined
·
7,195 Posts
Welcome aboard. My first ex is out there, somewhere, in Las Vegas. If you happen to see her, wave for me. Don't need to be real friendly tho, instead of waving with five fingers, you can just use one.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DesertRatTom
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top