Router Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello to the router forum. I've read and benefited from many posts but this is my first contribution.

I am building or buying a new router table that, due to space constraints, I'm adding to a customized MFT/3 rolling workbench I'm building. I plan to integrate my new router table with the MFT top, thus I plan to make my own MFT style router table top, with aligned 20mm holes so I can extend the MFT surface when not using the router. That said, I need a fence that will work in this scenario. I'm considering the Veritas and Incra fence systems.

Does anyone have experience with the Veritas Fence and Right Angle Sled? It looks slick, but I can't find many reviews. Any other suggestions would be welcome.

FYI. I had a stand-alone Woodpecker router table/fence/stand that I sold to make some room in my shop, and because I was unhappy with the performance of the fence. Despite much effort and contact with Woodpeckers, I couldn't get the outfeed side of the fence to lie truly flat relative to the infeed side. Later I discovered that the top of the dust collection housing was just slightly proud of the back of the fence on the outfeed side.

I also owned an Incra TS/LS 37" fence for my tablesaw, until I cut off two of my fingers. I sold the Incra with the tablesaw, never planning to use it again.
 

·
Super Moderator
John
Joined
·
6,935 Posts
Hello welcome to the forum.
 

·
Official Greeter
Joined
·
18,811 Posts
Welcome to the forum.

Sorry to hear about the fingers. You appear to blame the saw for the incident?
 

·
Official Greeter
Ross
Joined
·
9,172 Posts
Welcome to the forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I don't blame the saw

Welcome to the forum.

Sorry to hear about the fingers. You appear to blame the saw for the incident?
I wish I could blame the saw. I wish I knew what happened. A split second, a changed life. I sold the saw because I don't want to use equipment where the consequences are so severe. This is my own opinion, of course, and I begrudge no one their choices. I'm still very comfortable with my 18" bandsaw and mondo 12" jointer planer. Other than that, I've switched to a track saw and find I can do everything I need with the tools I have.
 

·
Official Greeter
Joined
·
18,811 Posts
I can see your point in regard to the table saw. It only takes a split second, as you say, to change a life.

The band saw and router can also bite you very quickly.

As long as you can still get some 'shed' time......
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
I have an uncle who has the Veritas fence but he uses it on the Veritas steel table. He likes it. I don't know if he has the right angle sled. I personally just use a push block for a sled. It's not as versatile but it works well for what I do. I also have a Veritas table but I use a home made fence on it. The tables are good in some ways but not others. You can attach any router in minutes but it isn't handy to pop the pouter out of the table to change bits like I can do with an insert plate in my home made table. If you search router tables on this forum you'll see lots of examples that might be of interest to you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Box Joints

I have an uncle who has the Veritas fence but he uses it on the Veritas steel table. He likes it. I don't know if he has the right angle sled. I personally just use a push block for a sled. It's not as versatile but it works well for what I do. I also have a Veritas table but I use a home made fence on it. The tables are good in some ways but not others. You can attach any router in minutes but it isn't handy to pop the pouter out of the table to change bits like I can do with an insert plate in my home made table. If you search router tables on this forum you'll see lots of examples that might be of interest to you.
Thanks for the info. The reason I'm interested in the sled is to cut box joints. I used to do this with my table saw and a dodo stack. As noted above, that is no longer an option. I have a coping sled that works fine for end grain coping. I would have to build a new jig, and rout for miter or t-track to do this. I've had issues in the past with making such grooves perfectly parallel with the fence, and was hoping for something a little more precise.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Thanks for the info. The reason I'm interested in the sled is to cut box joints. I used to do this with my table saw and a dodo stack. As noted above, that is no longer an option. I have a coping sled that works fine for end grain coping. I would have to build a new jig, and rout for miter or t-track to do this. I've had issues in the past with making such grooves perfectly parallel with the fence, and was hoping for something a little more precise.
It shouldn't be hard to get a groove parallel to the fence. Just clamp a spacer to the table against the fence and follow the spacer with the router. The groove has no choice except to be parallel. What becomes a problem is when you move the fence. Getting it the right distance from the bit while maintaining squareness can be a frustrating task. That's why I go with a sled or push block against the fence. It's always perfectly square. You could use this setup to cut box joints if you used a series of spacer strips the diameter of the cutter bit. It would help to have a table saw of course to cut the strips.

The same uncle that has the Veritas table and fence is a professional that has made a living at it for almost 50 years. He had a brain fart one day and cut the tips off 2 fingers. He still has his saw. He told me about it and he admitted the problem was that he wasn't focused on the job in front of him. Blaming the saw means that you are more likely to do something like it again one day. Since the saw doesn't have a brain it has to be blameless.
 

·
Registered
Theo
Joined
·
7,156 Posts
I wish I could blame the saw. I wish I knew what happened. A split second, a changed life. I sold the saw because I don't want to use equipment where the consequences are so severe. This is my own opinion, of course, and I begrudge no one their choices. I'm still very comfortable with my 18" bandsaw and mondo 12" jointer planer.
Hmm, that could have been at least part of the problem - you felt 'comfortable' with your saw. Can't do that, you always have to be a bit leery of 'any' power tool.
You left out details too. Using push block? Push stick? Sled? And how large was the stock you were sawing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Yes, I felt comfortable with the saw

Hmm, that could have been at least part of the problem - you felt 'comfortable' with your saw. Can't do that, you always have to be a bit leery of 'any' power tool.
You left out details too. Using push block? Push stick? Sled? And how large was the stock you were sawing?
This wasn't the purpose of this post, but I guess I brought it up. For the forensic investigators among you. It was a JTAS 10 circa 2000, with an OEM blade guard and aftermarket riving knife. I was cutting thin (3/4") rips from an 18" piece of 8/4 cherry. I was using a "Gripper" push block, with the riving knife, (the blade guard was removed as the "Gripper" crosses over the plane of the blade).

As far as I can tell, the blade hit a knot in the cherry at around 9" into the cut, split the wood, yanked my hand back, levered the far end of the off-cut piece into the space between the blade and the riving knife, grabbed the off-cut piece and kicked it up and back, flipping my hand and the gripper upside down while I continued to push forward, cutting through two fingers and the Gripper handle.

Of course, I don't know if that's what happened, as it happened in less time than it took to yank my hand back. Now you know as much as I do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Maintaining parallel miter slot with fence

It shouldn't be hard to get a groove parallel to the fence. Just clamp a spacer to the table against the fence and follow the spacer with the router. The groove has no choice except to be parallel. What becomes a problem is when you move the fence. Getting it the right distance from the bit while maintaining squareness can be a frustrating task. That's why I go with a sled or push block against the fence. It's always perfectly square. You could use this setup to cut box joints if you used a series of spacer strips the diameter of the cutter bit. It would help to have a table saw of course to cut the strips.

The same uncle that has the Veritas table and fence is a professional that has made a living at it for almost 50 years. He had a brain fart one day and cut the tips off 2 fingers. He still has his saw. He told me about it and he admitted the problem was that he wasn't focused on the job in front of him. Blaming the saw means that you are more likely to do something like it again one day. Since the saw doesn't have a brain it has to be blameless.

My problem is not cutting a parallel groove once, it is setting up the fence each and every time.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
My problem is not cutting a parallel groove once, it is setting up the fence each and every time.
Exactly, which is why I don't bother with the miter track. Anything that is that much trouble is no fun. The only solutions I see are the one I suggested or an Incra fence and sled if you want to keep it simple.

Interesting story about the gripper. It has been a hot topic recently and every one thought it would prevent an accident like yours. Just goes to show you can't too much trust in any system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Went with Incra Super Fence

Exactly, which is why I don't bother with the miter track. Anything that is that much trouble is no fun. The only solutions I see are the one I suggested or an Incra fence and sled if you want to keep it simple.

Interesting story about the gripper. It has been a hot topic recently and every one thought it would prevent an accident like yours. Just goes to show you can't too much trust in any system.
I finally decided to go with the Incra Super Fence system with the Wonder Fence. After watching their mind-numbing how to videos, I gave it a try. Amazing difference! I haven't put it to use on a real project yet, but am very impressed with the way this system facilitates such complex joinery. No keys to create. No complex dovetail jigs to mount.

Without the LS positioner and joinery templates, I don't think this fence would be much different than any other fence. With these innovations, it's a clear winner.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top