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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there.

I found the forum accidentally... was Googling for tips on how to rout(?e) a hole in a counter top for a router table I'm endeavouring to build. Was surprised to find such a specific forum... I had all sorts of questions, but rather than just go ahead and ask them, I've been able to find a lot answers from the very extensive archives!

On the subject of my router table, I'm using an offcut of kitchen worktop (so a laminated particle board I think) and some UKJ (from Axminster Tools) hardware including their alu insert plate. I've got a Triton TRA001 to attach to it. The issue I had initially was they don't supply a template / guide to cut the hole for it; and I don't think one exists so will next be looking at making one... I'm intrigued to know if a specific type of bit is needed to cut it out; I had assumed that a straight bit with a guide bush would probably be enough... but based on what I've seen on this forum I have a huge amount to learn about how to use a router properly and effectively!

Anyway, hi. I live on a small island in the middle of the water between England and France and don't have access to extensive hardware shops locally, so I depend on the UK based websites and Amazon / eBay etc. for what I need which does pose some limitations.
 

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John
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Hello and welcome to the router forums
If your counter top is made with particle board material , moisture is a problem it has a tendency to warp
 

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Welcome. You dont need a template to cut the router plate hole.
This video gives you the idea;

But I advise wrapping a layer of masking tape around the EDGE of the plate first, cut off all excess.

And he hasnt matched the corner radius to the plate. Check the corner diameter of the plate. Use a forstner bit of the correct size in a drill to drill the corner radius (just rest the forstner bit against the two corner pieces of wood and drill slowly and square) then cut the shape out using a router with a straight sided flush trim bit as in the video. The masking tape gives just enough clearance for a perfect drop in fit.

As far as the kitchen work surface offcut, check it with a level for flatness before you start. If its a cheap surface, it will have curves and rolls in all directions. Which will be ok if youre going to use the table for general purpose work, but not so good if you want perfect shapes on small pieces as in model making or fie work.
 

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Hi, welcome to the Router Forums. It is filled with good informaiton.

The Triton (have one) is very heavy and requires a mounting plate. Here on AmazonUK is a link to the Kreg plate.

The top is what we call formica, and it is pretty light weight, so I suggest you add a second layer to the bottom. Cut the opening for the plate ever so slightly larger than the plate. Glue on the second layer of Baltic Birch Ply. Cut the second hole about one inch 25mm smaller to form a lip. BE SURE YOU MARK THE CURVED CORNERS OF THE LIP!! SO YOU CAN CUT THEM OUT JUST INSIDE THE LINE.Then you can use the Kreg levelers in the picture to level up the plate with the top.

To cut each opening, rough cut the opening slightly under sized with a jig saw. Drill a starting hole somewhere in the middle, but cut the curve that matches the plate's curve as well. Once you remove the cuts, glue together under a LOT of weight so they are pressed together flat. You can apply a few screws, but go through the top layer and counter sink so the heads are below the surface. That will give you a pretty strong top that will stay flat over time. Just make sure the top and weights are set out on a very flat surface.

Next, you put the plate in place across the lip you left all round and set four boards against the edges of the plate as shown, add a playing card or thin piece of cardboard between the boards and plate to allow a little bit of wiggle room so it will be easier to lift the plate and router out from time to time. use the curven lines you drew earlier to finalize the curve after the next step

Clamp the boards down firmly so they won't move, and/or, use some double stick carpet tape between the board and surface. I'd do both.

Now you can use a trim router bit, set to the same depth as the thickness of the plate, plus about 1-2 mm. This will allow the levelers to do their thing. Trim the straight edges first and then use a rasp, sandpaper to finish the corner curves for a nice fit.

The alternative is to use a much larger diameter Mortising bit (shown below) and let it cut the curve. You will have to experiment with the size to find one that matches the plate's curve, but probably a one inch diameter bit with what is called a top mounted bearing, the bearing is on the shaft end of the cutting part of the bit. This will be a little easier, but the hand trimming the corners will be more available.

I hope this has been helpful. Here are the pictures:
396431


Kreg Tool PRS4034 Insert Plate w/Level-loc Rings (predrilled Triton), Black & Red: Amazon.co.uk: DIY & Tools
396432
396433
 

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Good point on moisture. Consider using contact cement. CAUTION Applied to both surfaces, you MUST align the two pieces precisely because you CANNOT pry them apart. Cut the outside of the top and bottom exactly the same size. Getting the to align to my thinking means placing the bottom layer first, then clamping several pieces of wood around so the act to align the two pieces. CAREFULLY align the second piece over the opening and as evenly as possible, push it into place. A tiny error won't matter much, a large error means redoing the top. But it will not trigger any moisture swelling in the top layer.

Just noticed the video. It should do the trick and you have the link to the plate. I had to drill a half inch hole for the Triton crank. After mounting the Triton, I used a punch to mark the center, removed the router, thern carefully drilled using a very sharp drill bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks all for the great advice; will try and absorb it. That video certainly makes it look relatively simple... I haven't seen that method before. I have a 15mm forstner which seems to match the diameter of the corner. I will try and understand how that will work!

I think this top is particle board? The moisture could be an issue - it's all in my garage which is dry and relatively warm as it's attached to my house - so who knows.

I've attached a few pics of where I'm at in terms of a base and the counter top. I have an aluminium insert plate which is compatible with the Triton. The Bosch on top I will keep for other jobs.

One thing I've read is that you can put an additional thin stainless plate in under the main insert so that the levelling screws have something solid to bite on.

Table Furniture Wood Desk Hardwood
Table Furniture Workbench Machine Wood
Electronics Technology Wood Electronic device Electronic instrument
 

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The aluminum plate should be fine for leveling screws. Nice you got one with the bayonet, twist lock inserts. The old type had three screws, which had a special talent for disappearing. Do add that second layer.
 

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Theo
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Welcome aboard.
 

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the worktop is unlikely to swell too much in damp conditions, but just paint all the exposed surfaces just to make sure.

You stick the wooden pieces down as per the video. you then use the forstner bit in the corners to the depth of the plate plus a couple of mm. Then carefully rout the straight lines so that you dont overshoot into the curves.
Drill a hole in the middle of the plate and use a jigsaw to cut out the waste to the routed groove.
The 2 big screws are the main plate retainers, the tiny grub screws around the edges are for levelling to the table top in all directions. You should not need anything else, but if the grub screws bite into the board without levelling, just put a very small metal washer under each one.
I suggest cutting 2 mm deeper than the plate all around, then you can add metal washers to all areas to get true level.
 

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G'day and welcome to the forum..

Love my Triton TRA001 (waiting for a new speed controller to come from UK)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Made a little bit of progress over the weekend; the insert is now... inserted. Felt a bit like open heart surgery. Cut the middle out with a multi-tool. There's one small nick on the edge but otherwise I'm happy with the fit.

Deboxed the Triton... it's a monster! Need to now carefully prepare it to go on the plate...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well I'm calling v1 of this table done. It's in and have done a first test cut with new 'Cavetto' bit from Wealdon. I put some threaded inserts in to the table top so the insert is attached, and put some smaller metal washers beneath the grub screws so hopefully that will hold up.

I have not yet drilled out the hole for the lifter as I decided to try it by hand for now before potentially making a mess of the insert plate. If I decide I need it I will look at drilling it or possibly fabricate / 3d print an angle bracket / adaptor so the lifter comes out of the front.

I had ordered an NVR a while ago but actually the position of the power switch on the router makes it pretty easy to activate... so will see about installing that if it ever arrives. Have also got a T-track and miter gauge to go on at some point; but keen to just experiment with it for a while and see what I end needing.

Must say the noise the motor on the Triton makes is very pleasing. It's like a happy whirr... admittedly I've got it on the lowest speed at the moment.

Right. Now to figure out how to use it.
 

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