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I've been working with wood my entire life (never very seriously, or very well, for that matter) but I have always been intimidated by routers. I just installed a vinyl floor in my kitchen, and decided it was time to take the plunge (pun intended) and purchase one so I could design an oak threshold.
I lucked into a two piece Porter Cable kit with a fixed base router that also has a plunge base. Don't have the model numbers in front of me right now, but I am on this forum in hopes of finding a decent router table for them. The Porter Cable brand gets pretty bad reviewson on amazon, so I'm wanting to find out who might make a "universal" table, or one that can be adapted. I'm also curious if it's the plunge base I will use when the router is mounted to the table (I see mention of the Router Raizer for this) or if I should stick with the fixed base.
As for the oak threshold, I (and the wife) couldn't wait for me to learn to use the router, so I just ripped on edge at 45% on the table saw, then notched that edge to account for the difference in height from wood floor to vinyl. Then I nailed and glued a piece of base shoe to the other side of the threshold, and it looks fantastic.
 

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Hi JB

The router will make you a Pro. in no time and you will say I don't know how I did without it all this time. :)
It can do so much more than but a nice edge on some stock,and the router table is the next step up after you have a new router . :)

The Oak-Park router system is a neat way to go, you can get the starter setup and make your base cabinet, the top is the real key to having a nice router table that can do it all,and the Oak-Park top is a great one.
Bob and Rick of the RWS have a way of doing things on the router table that will blow your mind and you will say I didn't know you could do that on a router table.
Bob & Rick are the Pro's. and have been doing it a long time and they will say this all the time "make it simple" and they do. :)

Here's a link or two you may want ot check out.

http://us.oak-park.com/catalogue.html?list=BYOT--
http://us.oak-park.com/catalogue.html?list=RTS--
http://www.routerworkshop.com/epage.html
http://www.routerforums.com/email-router-tips-members-only/

Just one more NOTE***P.C. router
I recommend you put the fix base in the router table and use the plunge base when you need to use the router away from the router table.


Bj :)
 

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Welcome to the router forums roadhunter. Be "SAFE" and enjoy.
 

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I don't know why PC routers get bad reviews, they are great tools.. I also have the PC 895 set like yours and love it..
Right now I have the plunge base in my table with the return springs taken out.. I seem to do better handheld routing with the fixed base.. I use a block of 4x4 wood with a blind nut and a bolt with a small round piece of particle board to use as a router lift.. At least that's what I'll use till I get another fixed base to mount in the table..
 

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Welcome to the router forums! You will get some good advise. On the PC router issue... I have heard certain models are good and some just aren't fan favorites anymore. Just depends on who is telling the story I guess..... I don't own a PC router so I cannot judge. I think most of the bad press on the 890 Series has to do with the sticky or clunky plunge mechanisms and the motors get real hot. The big 7518 is a workhorse from what I have read and the 690 series are tried and trued favorites of many woodworkers.

Corey
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all of the advice. I've seen Bob and Rick before, and was amazed at some of the things they are able to do. After seeing reviews of the PC router tables, and not being quite sure what "universal" table might work, the idea of building one with the kit you recommend sounds intriguing.
 

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Welcome Roadhunter. The absolute best first project with a router is to build your own router table. This gets you aquainted with the tool and shows you how really easy they are to use. Back in 1981 Bob and Rick introduced the world to the router mounting plate and things havent been the same since. Plates are available in many different sizes and styles now. Spend some time reading the many posts on table plans and the merits of different mounting plates. The nice thing about this process is there is no wrong way to go about it, which ever set up you go with will do the job. The reason PC brand router tables get a bum rap is they are difficult to work with and home built tables provide a much better value.
 
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