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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good afternoon, I am a newbie here and this seems to be the best place to ask questions and recieve quality answers.
So here's my question:
In the past I've made circle and odd shaped jigs to duplicate pieces but my parts have always been out of wood. Using 2sided tape on the parts wood and jig worked good. To save wear and tear on the router bit I'd cut out the majority of wood to leave me about a 1/2" or less of skeleton that the bit would have to cut out.
Now I'm wanting to cut out some 1/4" plexiglass for a workbench window area.
I've made a jig that fits into the odd cutout in the wood panel.
I've always used a flush trim bit to follow the jig but after reading I seem to understand that it's not the best bit for the task. Some have mentioned a 0 flute bit because it'll cut smoother and also feed the plexiglass from the item piece.
So the question is:
When I look at these bits they look like a cnc cutting tool, there's no bearing on what I've see so if I'm wanting to use a jig whether it's an inside or outside cut it doesn't seem like this would work for duplicating parts.
Any advice here will be greatly appreciated.
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Welcome to the forum, @RC6069

I have no trouble cutting acrylic (to make jigs) using a normal straight cutter with a guide bushing to follow the template, or on a table with a fence.
You will have to allow for the offset when making the template.

I have also cut acrylic using a jig saw, so there are other ways...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Good afternoon and thank all of you for your replies also for the video.
I'd like to take a moment revisit my post as I may not have been real clear in my description.
In the past as I mentioned I'd make a jig usually out of MDF that I'd use to duplicate parts that I'd use for a project.
On this workstation I knew I could cut the plexiglass with a jigsaw and it'd be okay visually from outside the gray panel but from the inside I'd see not so straight and finished looking edges. I could make a cosmetic trim panel to dress that up, true. Normally I use a 2 or 4 flute flush trim bit with the bearing to glide along the jig.
So thinking about how I use the router for wood projects I decided to make a jig that would fit inside the interior frame of the panel and router out a duplicate piece using the router and flush trim. What I noticed was that the cut part would melt up as also described in the video. I kept moving the clumps off the project piece to keep it from fusing back together.
In some reading it was mentioned to use a "0" flute bit so I googled it and saw that it looks like a cnc bit. My mind said "that may not be good to run along a jig or even to keep from wanting to run off" seeing how there's no bearing to run along the jig.
In one picture you'll see the wood jig where I made it an inch thick by adding additional edge pieces on the jig. That was so the trim bit bearing wouldn't be so close to the plexi edge.
the plexiglass is adhered to the jig using 2 sided tape.
I hope this helps describe what I looking for that will be helpful. Thanks again for your advice.
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In the pictures below you can see the inside section of the panel I want to add the plexiglass windows to. There's the upper geometric area and the more of a rectangle area below. These will be at the far right and left panels. The 2 benches will be bolted together to form 1 bench with the center frames being an open pass through.
 
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